Archive
Photography
The World’s Smallest Camera (May, 1931)

The World’s Smallest Camera

WHAT is probably the world’s smallest camera is illustrated below. This camera was made by the Eastman Kodak company and is a masterpiece of construction; being no larger than a thumb nail, and yet perfect in every detail and capable of taking pictures which are mechanically perfect.

Three months were required in the construction of this midget, every part having been made by hand. A leather case, with a finger loop, has been made to hold it.

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how to give your shots new life (Oct, 1952)

how to give your shots new life

For pictures with a natural, lifelike snap and sparkle . . . with remarkable detail and definition, no camera fills the bill the way a Leica does. The supreme resolving power of its lenses . . . their amazing versatility open up a whole new world of picture possibilities. And any kind of picture-making is simple with a light, compact, precision-perfect Leica, designed for almost automatic ease of operation . . . carrying . . . maneuvering. Ask your photo-expert Leica Dealer.

Leica
makes better pictures easier
E. LEITZ, Inc., 304 Hudson St., New York 13, N.Y.

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Air Photos Made by Army Pigeons (Jul, 1930)

Air Photos Made by Army Pigeons

TINY aerial photos, snapped by a little camera attached to a carrier pigeon, are being made in Germany, where these birds are trained for military purposes. One of the small cameras, fastened to a pigeon’s body, can take six automatic snapshots while the bird is in flight.

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ODD “PINWHEEL CAMERA” CATCHES LIGHTNING (Nov, 1936)

ODD “PINWHEEL CAMERA” CATCHES LIGHTNING

Vagaries of lightning bolts are recorded with a “pinwheel camera” devised by Prof.

John G. Albright of the Case School of Applied Science. At the height of an electrical storm, the shutters of the cameras mounted on a wheel are opened, and the wheel is rotated rapidly by hand. A multiple lightning discharge along a single path is recorded as a series of parallel streaks, and a study of the film gives a clear picture of its behavior. Through the curious arrangement of the cameras, every part of the sky is covered.

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Triple Lens Windshield Camera Spots Traffic Violations (Dec, 1936)

Triple Lens Windshield Camera Spots Traffic Violations
MOUNTED on the windshield, a new triple lens camera, operated without diverting the driver’s eyes from the road, records three distinct views of traffic violations encountered while driving. The camera also records the time and date when used and the film shifts automatically for the next picture.

One of the views taken by the camera is a large

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UNCLE SAM GETS GIGANTIC CAMERA (Dec, 1932)

UNCLE SAM GETS GIGANTIC CAMERA

Big enough for an eight-year-old child to walk through, a camera that can use any plate from four by five inches to four by four feet, has been designed for the U. S. Geological Survey. It is suspended from an overhead track twenty-five feet long and four feet wide. This suspension prevents vibrations from the ground or building interfering with the apparatus.

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CAMERA ON GUN TO TRAP CROOKS (Jul, 1934)

CAMERA ON GUN TO TRAP CROOKS

Photographic identification of fleeing criminals may be obtained with a recently perfected camera which is attached to a pistol or rifle and worked by the gun’s trigger. The lens used can work at an opening of F/3.5, which permits the camera to be used in comparatively poor light and at high speed. The small negatives are sharp enough to be enlarged.

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Fading memories or fadeless movies… which you bring back? (Mar, 1930)

Fading memories or fadeless movies… which you bring back?

Words cannot tell, occasional snapshots cannot capture the moving splendor of your travels. Bring back a record, adequate and imperishable, in priceless, personal movies.

But choose your movie camera carefully. It will be too late to reconsider when you have returned from your travels. Choose the personal model of the Bell and Howell professional studio cameras that film producers have relied upon for more than 23 years in making theater movies. Choose Filmo.

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TINY FISH “SIT” FOR ODD PORTRAITS (Jul, 1937)

TINY FISH “SIT” FOR ODD PORTRAITS

MAKING close-up “portrait” photographs of tiny fish and other forms of aquatic life is the unusual hobby of Lynwood M. Chace of Swansea, Mass. Clad in rubber boots and equipped with a net and pail, Chace scours the shallow waters of near-by ponds and marshes for interesting fresh-water specimens, which he deposits in a small glass-walled aquarium set up on a table in his photographic studio.

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HUGE CAMERA READS METERS TO COUNT TELEPHONE CALLS (Jul, 1937)

HUGE CAMERA READS METERS TO COUNT TELEPHONE CALLS

Special cameras of new design are taking the place of human meter readers who check and record, each month, the number of telephone calls for which you are to be billed. In the larger cities, a single telephone central office may employ as many as 10,000 individual registers or meters, and teams of clerks have been required to read them. Photographing twenty-five meters at a time, the cameras give a quicker reading and one that is proof against error.

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