Archive
Scary
Build Your Own Geiger-Gun (Jul, 1957)

Remember, EVERYONE should have a Geiger counter! No exceptions. If you don’t build one now, you’re going to feel mighty stupid when you’re trying to evade the radioactive hot spots in post-apocalyptic America.

Geiger-Gun

Ultra-simple counter useful on camping trips or in CD survival kit

EVERYONE, prospector or not, should have a Geiger counter. Many wise householders are assembling survival kits of food, bandages, and water. By adding this handy, inexpensive radiation detector, you can provide your family with a means of detection of contaminated material in the event of atomic warfare. Simple as the counter may be, it will detect radiation as feeble as that given off by a watch dial—or it could make you rich by locating a uranium ore vein.

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New Lung Lets Patient Sit Up (Nov, 1953)

New Lung Lets Patient Sit Up
A polio victim needn’t lie on his back in this new respirator, being tested at the Harvard School of Public Health. It was designed to give a patient a more normal view of the world than he gets when confined to other “iron lungs.” He sits on a comfortable chair that can be raised, lowered and otherwise adjusted.

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Human Fireworks (Jan, 1936)

Living Actors Animate Fireworks
SPECTACULAR pyrotechnics animated by living performers clad in asbestos suits have been part of the display which thrilled London audiences at the Crystal Palace during the past season.
Most famous of the acts is “Blondin on his tight rope,” in which “Blondin,” outlined in blazing powder, pushes a fiery wheelbarrow across a flaming plank. The heat generated by the display would be sufficient to melt iron.

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Muzzle Safeguards Chickens (Jul, 1938)

Muzzle Safeguards Chickens
EASILY attached to a chicken’s beak, a new aluminum muzzle prevents vicious picking, cannibalism and feather pulling. The muzzle is so delicately balanced that it automatically swings out of the way when the chicken lowers its head for eating and drinking, swinging back into a closed position when the bird raises its head. The device thus prevents the chicken from attacking others, or its own body.

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Promise of a golden future (Mar, 1953)

Promise of a golden future
Yellow uranium ore from the Colorado Plateau is helping to bring atomic wonders to you

Long ago, Indian braves made their war paint from the colorful sandstones of the Colorado Plateau.

THEY USED URANIUM-Their brilliant yellows came from carnotite, the important uranium-bearing mineral. Early in this century, this ore supplied radium for the famous scientists, Marie and Pierre Curie, and later vanadium for special alloys and steels.
Today, this Plateau—stretching over parts of Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona —is our chief domestic source of uranium. Here, new communities thrive; jeeps and airplanes replace the burro; Geiger counters supplant the divining rod and miner’s hunch.

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Electric Preacher (Aug, 1949)

Wow, that’s pretty cool. I wonder why don’t they do that in the mega-chruches. Can’t you just imagine Jerry Fallwell shooting lightning from his finger tips? He’d look like a pudgy version of the Emporer from Star Wars… Oh. Mabe that’s why they don’t.

Fingertip Sermon is given by George E. Speake at a Christian Endeavor convention. One million volts arch from his body through electrodes on his fingertips. Sparks really fly when he’s on the pulpit!

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LOBSTERS ARE LIKE PEOPLE (Jun, 1952)

The Truman one is kinda cute and the De Gaulle one looks like it should be in the Dark Crystal.


LOBSTERS ARE LIKE PEOPLE

Jean Sulpice, Parisian restaurateur, believes that lobsters and people have similar features. These “portraits” seem to prove the artist’s contention.

With a few props (a cigar, glasses and hats) and his lobster shells, the Frenchman created these caricatures of two famous international figures.

ANYONE WHO HAS seen Paris knows about Place Pigalle—and knows that almost anything can be found there. That is why it is no surprise to learn that in the city of artists, one Pigalle restaurateur is an artist who hangs his work from the ceiling. More surprising is his medium—lobster shells!

Page 2 Captions:
Left, no label is needed to identify De Gaulle. Right, not so easy to recognize is the figure of the French president. Vincent Auriol

Fine wire holds the various parts of the figures together in their lifelike poses

Hanging from the ceiling in a somewhat frightening array are scores of examples of the artist’s work in a variety of subjects

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Scariest Magazine Cover (Aug, 1938)

I dunno, but this just makes me think of John Wayne Gacy.

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“BASH AN APACHE”?!?! (Jun, 1959)

I’m really not sure what this has to do with Apaches, but damn! Spikes and acid?

“BASH AN APACHE” says this Paris cab driver, showing teeth, nail-studded bully, acid squirter he uses on tough customers

Update:
In the comments Stannous explains the term Apache. It’s actually much more interesting than the picture:

Not the Indians- French thugs:
By 1874 Paris was swarming with vagabonds. Consisting mostly of juvenile delinquents, these ten thousand or so ruffians would evolve into a new generation of street-fighter, banding into a gang which came to be known as the Apache.
The word “Apache” (pronounced “ah – PAHASH”) is a Parisian term used to describe the French street gangs of the early 1900s. The era’s local newspapers often described the violence perpetrated by these gangs as synonymous with the ferocity of Apache Indians in battle.

The typical French Apache was a young, lower-class, pimp-type vagabond with connections to the underworld. An interesting by-product of this underground culture was “Apache dancing” — a type of “street swing” which simulated actions and movements of urban violence, and actually contained combat techniques particular to the typical Apache’s repertoire. This dance was reportedly so violent that participants sometimes died of injuries sustained from being thrown across bars, onto tables, or after being struck with mistimed blows.

Understandably, this form of dancing was confined to the Apache culture, although for a short time it did attract the attention of the upper class, who came to appreciate a toned-down version which was said to be somewhat similar to the tango.

The Apaches most prominently focused on their own form of street combat however. Crude and unscrupulous, yet highly effective, “French Apache street fighting” emphasised the use of elementary street kicks, hand strikes, head-butts, throws, and an assortment of weapons both standard and improvised which included knuckle dusters, knives, razors, scarves, bodkins,,jackets, hats, the Apache gun and even sheep bones!

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Growing Blanket of Carbon Dioxide Raises Earth’s Temperature (Aug, 1953)

Normally I don’t post articles without pictures, but this one just floored me. This little blurb from 53 years ago perfectly sums up the greenhouse effect and global warming.

Growing Blanket of Carbon Dioxide Raises Earth’s Temperature
Earth’s ground temperature is rising 1-1/2 degrees a century as a result of carbon dioxide discharged from the burning of about 2,000,000,000 tons of coal and oil yearly. According to Dr. Gilbert N. Plass of the Johns Hopkins University, this discharge augments a blanket of gas around the world which is raising the temperature in the same manner glass heats a greenhouse. By 2080, he predicts the air’s carbon-dioxide content will double, resulting in an average temperature rise of at least four percent. If most of man’s industrial growth were over a period of several thousand years, instead of being crowded within the last century, oceans would have absorbed most of the excess carbon dioxide. But because of the slow circulation of the seas, they have had little effect in reducing the amount of the gas as man’s smoke-making abilities have multiplied over the past hundred years.

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