Archive
Sign of the Times
Going Steady (Jun, 1954)

Going Steady

TEEN-AGERS FIND IT IS A HAPPY GUARANTEE OF DATES

Photographed for LIFE by CARL IWASKI

“After we had three or four dates,” Barbara King recalls wistfully, “I knew I wanted to go steady with Morrie. I hinted and hinted and hinted —and finally he asked me.” From that day last fall, at the start of their senior year at Greeley, Colo, high school, through last week when they were graduated as honor students, Morrie Mawson and Barbara, both 17 years old, have spent a part of almost every day with each other.

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SMOKING OUT JAP SPIES (May, 1942)

I wonder how many Japanese spies the internments actually prevented from acts of espionage. My guess would be close to zero. Besides the blatant racism, xenophobia and violation of civil rights, it just seems like a ridiculously inefficient way to stop espionage.

SMOKING OUT JAP SPIES

by Don Eddy

If you are not yet awake to the peril of invasion on our west coast, this article will give you a jolt. For weeks Mr. Eddy has been hot on the trail of enemies in our midst. He has seen U.S. agents uncover nests of spies working with short-wave radio, blinkers, signal flags, and carrier pigeons. And we’ve been handling these deadly snakes with kid gloves! Eighty per cent of them slip from the Army’s grip through legal loopholes. With our shores in imminent danger, this article is a challenging call for action.

JUST before midnight on last December 22, a young California farmer and his girl were sitting in a parked automobile at the brink of a cliff overlooking the Pacific Ocean. It was a clear, crisp night.

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BEWARE THE BANK GOBBLER (Oct, 1930)

BEWARE THE BANK GOBBLER

George W. Hensel, Jr., warns of the chain gang that threatens small towns, in an interview with
JOHN T. FLYNN

I WAS sitting in George Hensel’s big parlor talking with him about the new bank building just on the other side of the road. Hensel is the president of that bank and he was telling me about it and about other country banks and bankers he had known. This was in Quarryville, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, a village of a thousand souls in the center of one of the richest farming sections in the world. Go south from that bank a dozen miles and you will almost run into the Susquehanna as she flows into Maryland. Hensel’s bank stands at a fork in the road.

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THE Superiority of MODERN WOMAN (Nov, 1956)

THE Superiority of MODERN WOMAN

More and more women have invaded fields from which their supposed physical, mental or psychological limitations once barred them. With increasing opportunities and a formidable record of success in competition with men, women are now laying claim not only to equality but even to superiority. By recognizing the fields of their superiority, women can attain their proper place in society and perform vital functions for the benefit of mankind in this no-longer-a-man’s world.

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Interesting People in the American Scene (May, 1942)

Interesting People in the American Scene

Governor.

ROBERT OSCAR BLOOD is one public official who looks after the physical as well as the political needs of his constituents. Besides being Governor of New Hampshire, he is a practicing physician, and often keeps a committee waiting in the state capitol at Concord while he dashes over to the hospital to deliver a baby or perform an appendectomy.

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YOUR LIFE TEN YEARS FROM TODAY (Nov, 1956)

That is a gorgeous toolkit on the third page.

YOUR LIFE TEN YEARS FROM TODAY

During the next 10 years the world will see changes dramatic as those introduced by the industrial revolution. Technicological progress will be equal in this period to that of any previous five decades, and in its wake will come new problems. If man can foresee and meet these challenges, our way of life in 10 years could be amazingly different.

by Leo Cherne

The progress of these next 10 years will be as dramatic, as filled with change, as jampacked with impact for American business in the total American community as any 50 years in the entire development of civilized man.

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BEAM OF LIGHT FROM DISTANT STAR TO OPEN WORLD’S FAIR (Feb, 1932)

BEAM OF LIGHT FROM DISTANT STAR TO OPEN WORLD’S FAIR

A beam of light that left the star Arcturus about the time of the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893 will set in motion the wheels of the 1933 World’s Fair at Chicago. Upon the star, approximately forty-one light years away, will be trained the great forty-inch telescope of the Yerkes Observatory at Williams Bay, Wis.

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New Products Hasten Return of PROSPERITY (Feb, 1933)

New Products Hasten Return of PROSPERITY

How Inventors’ Activity Is Swelling the Growing Tide of Business MANY times has the statement been made that prosperity will return through the appearance of a great new invention which will create a new industry just as the development of the automobile, the movies, the radio, has added billions to the national wealth of the United States in the past.

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Mobile Bank Tours Suburbs (Feb, 1930)

Mobile Bank Tours Suburbs

A ROVING bank on wheels has just been put into service by the Seaboard National bank of Los Angeles, to serve a wide and diversified clientele of depositors whose demand for swift and convenient banking facilities is thus met. Guards armed with riot guns and a sub-machinegun protect the automobile bank against hold-up men. The photo shows the traveling bank teller serving two of the moving bank’s hundreds of small depositors.

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THE DOLLAR VALUE OF MORAL FIBER IN BUSINESS (Apr, 1917)

“The mother of one was a divorcee. That of another kept a Pomeranian poodle.”

Finally, someone that makes sense! Now maybe others will believe me when I say that the financial meltdown was actually a secret plot by devious, amoral Pomeranians and not those poor, honest bankers.

THE DOLLAR VALUE OF MORAL FIBER IN BUSINESS

by George H. Cushing

THE biggest thing in American life today is that children are not being disciplined. They are not given moral training. Every man notes the result but only a few the cause.

The first visible result is lack of respect for the parent and wholesale disobedience. This comes to seed in impudence to older persons generally and disregard for the rights of others.

The second expression of the same thing is the absence of any sense of responsibility. This is the root of the lack of application which is almost universal in the younger generation.

The third expression of the same thing is the feverish demand for excitement and extravagant amusement. In this respect, the younger generation is abnormal. It cuts loose from all forms of restraint.

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