Archive
Space
Signals from the Stars (Jul, 1952)

Things have come a very, very long way since then. Check out the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), currently being built in Chile. When it’s complete it will have 66 separate dishes, each over 12 meters in diameter and be powered by one of the worlds fastest supercomputers.

Signals from the Stars

EVER since it was first indicated that the static present in the output of radio receivers was due in part to physical disturbances on the sun a new field of research has attracted popular scientific interest. It is radio astronomy, whose equipment and observers listen not to man made responses, but instead to continuous “static” from the stars. That cosmic radio noise exists was realized as far back as 1931. Early records proved it to be most intense when receivers probed toward the Milky Way, or lengthwise through our enormous watch-shaped galaxy.

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Star Gazers in the Sky (Oct, 1956)

Star Gazers in the Sky

By G. Harry Stine

Vikng-Aerobee Operations Engineer White Sands Proving Ground

SOONER or later the question arises: what are we going to do when we finally get our rockets into outer space? Among the people who have answers ready are the astronomers. If you have ever built any of the telescopes featured in this magazine and then used them to look at the moon and the planets, you realize why. Through an earthbound telescope, the images swim, ripple and blur. No matter how good an observing spot you have chosen, you are always peering out through the Earth’s murky, turbulent atmosphere which distorts what you see and which also distorts the things scientific instruments such as the spectroscope see.

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Mars Refuses to Answer Radio Messages (May, 1929)

“Doctor” Hugh Mansfield Robinson was an LLD or Dr of Law in England.  The rest of the story may be found here.

Mars Refuses to Answer Radio Messages

DESPITE numerous efforts to communicate with them, the inhabitants of the planet Mars have thus far been consistent in their refusal to have anything to do with the earth-folks at the other end of the telephone line. The latest evidence of the unsocial nature of the Martians came recently when Dr. H. Mansfield Robinson, shown in the picture at the left, attempted to send a message to a woman on Mars who, he reported, had been in communication with him. Although listeners all over the world were on the alert for her response, it failed to come through.

The instruments employed by Dr. Robinson were an ordinary wireless set and a device which he calls a psycho-telepathic motor-meter. Apparently the science of interplanetary communication is as yet a great deal short of perfection.

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Carter of the Red Planet – Part 3 (Jul, 1929)

Carter of Mars Series:

  • Part 1
  • Part 2 (unavailable, if you have a copy of the June, 1929 issue of Modern Mechanics, and want to send me a scan, that would be great.)
  • Part 3

Carter of the Red Planet

Enlisting the services of the Green Men of Thark, John Carter and his formidable allies battle their way into the city of Zodanga and rescue the imprisoned Princess of Helium in this concluding installment of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ great story of weird adventure on the planet Mars. “Carter of the Red Planet” is the most extraordinary work of imaginative fiction yet to come from the pen of the man who will be remembered as the author of “Tarzan of the Apes.”

by EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS

Author of “TARZAN”.

IN WHAT strange manner I was transported across the wastes of space to the planet Mars, I cannot say—it was inexplicable to me then, years ago, and it is inexplicable now. The important fact was that I, John Carter of Virginia, awoke to find myself lying on the moss-bound ground of Mars, surrounded by a group of immense four-armed creatures whom I came to know as the Green Men of Mars.

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Carter of The Red Planet – Part 1 (May, 1929)

In it’s first year of publication Modern Mechanix, called Modern Mechanics at the time, published a number of serialized works of fiction by Edgar Rice Burroughs. I’ve been waiting to post these until I had a complete set of each serial, the case of Carter of Mars I am missing part 2 which was printed in the June, 1929 issue.

The early issues of Modern Mechanics are very hard to find. They come up for auction rarely, and tend to be rather expensive. There is a copy of it currently for sale on eBay, but because of the recently released movie, it’s currently priced at $160. A bit more than I’m willing to pay for a single issue of a magazine. If anyone reading this owns a copy and wants to send me scans of the story, I’d love to post it.

If you are interested in reading this version of the story, but don’t care if it is a scan of the magazine, someone collected all of the Burroughs stories from MM into a book and you can buy it on Amazon: A Trilogy Of Stories: Conquest Of The Moon/Lost Inside The Earth/Carter Of The Red Planet

Carter of Mars Series:

Carter of The Red Planet

A Novel of Extraordinary Adventure on the Red Planet Mars

by EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS

From the distant planet Earth, John Carter, the Virginian, came to Mars to battle with Green Warriors in his peril-fraught effort to breathe new life into a dying world. Begin this great serial now; a summary of previous chapters is printed as part of the story.

OF THE incredible manifestation of nature which took me, John Carter of Virginia, and wafted me across countless miles of space to the planet Mars, I think I need say little. In the first place, I cannot myself explain how my soul was drawn irresistibly toward the red planet on that night, years ago, when I stood mysteriously alone on an Arizona hill; nor does it really matter how the miracle of my transmigration was accomplished.

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Scientist’s Theory Explodes Hopes of Talking to Mars (Mar, 1932)

Scientist’s Theory Explodes Hopes of Talking to Mars

THE possibility of transmitting signals to Mars by short waves has long been a moot question among scientists. Some say no, and some say yes, but the latest contribution to the dispute has been made by Dr. Alexanderson, world famous electrical wizard.

Dr. Alexanderson’s stand on the question is negative, for the reason, he claims, that there exists another electrical ceiling beyond the moon which impedes the signals sent out from the earth. He also believes that the signals may get “snarled” in a mysterious electrical medium of some sort, which holds the waves imprisoned for a fraction of a second before releasing them for a return to earth.

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Fabulous Floating Control Center Will Guide us to the Moon (Feb, 1968)

Fabulous Floating Control Center Will Guide us to the Moon

Huge antennas, eyes and ears for our moon shot, mark Redstone — a $45-million engineering miracle

By W. STEVENSON BACON

One fateful day within the next two years, crew members of the USNS Redstone, a smallish converted World War II tanker, will find themselves with a momentous mission. Cruising in the South Pacific off American Samoa, they will be responsible for the safety of our first astronauts to fly to the moon. Second by second, they will check out the condition of the Saturn S-IV B stage that will carry the Apollo out of its parking orbit and into a translunar trajectory.

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The Amateur Telescope Maker’s Page (Jul, 1956)

There now some slightly bigger telescopes in the Pacific area.

The Amateur Telescope Maker’s Page

AT a cash outlay of $300, boys at a Hawaiian school built a 20-inch reflecting telescope which has been valued at $20,000. It is said to be one of the largest telescopes in the Pacific area. With the exception of the grinding of the mirror, all the work was done by the students of the Kamehameha school, a private grammar school named after Hawaii’s greatest king. The f-6 mirror was donated by a government employee who ground it himself, taking six months for the job.

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Photographs STAR Moving 4800 MILES A SECOND (May, 1930)

This article is interesting for a number of reasons. One of the most interesting is that M.L Humasen was a high-school dropout who got a job as a janitor at Mt. Wilson Observatory where the was later made a member of the astronomical staff . He went on to take many of the observation that Edwin Hubble used to formulate Hubble’s Law. It’s odd that in the interview Humasen says he doesn’t believe the universe is “blowing up” which is precisely what Hubble’s Law says, though a bit less dramatically.

I’m a little confused about calling the object a star. N.G.C 4800 is actually a galaxy. Hubble was the one who proved, in the early 1920′s that these distant objects were outside the Milky Way and were in fact galaxies. Since they also refer to it as a nebula (which was sort of a catch-all term for blurry stellar objects at the time) I’m going to guess that it was just the reporter who decided it was a star.

I don’t know enough about solar spectra to be sure, but it seems like you wouldn’t be able to make a direct comparison of the spectra from a whole galaxy to that of one star. Incidentally N.G.C 4800 is actually 97.14 million light years away not the 50 million the article states.

Photographs STAR Moving 4800 MILES A SECOND

Sitting with his eye glued to a telescopic camera for 45 hours, M. L. Humason, Mt. Wilson astronomer, has succeeded in setting a record for long distance photographs. The nebula on which he trained his camera is 50,000,000 light years away from the earth.

FOR 45 hours in total darkness, Milton L. Humason, member of the astronomical staff at the Mt. Wilson observatory at Pasadena, California, trained the world’s largest telescope toward a far distant point in the heavens and obtained a photograph of a nebula 50,000,000 light years away from the earth—a total of 300 quintillion miles.

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Signals from the Stars (Jul, 1952)

Signals from the Stars

EVER since it was first indicated that the static present in the output of radio receivers was due in part to physical disturbances on the sun a new field of research has attracted popular scientific interest. It is radio astronomy, whose equipment and observers listen not to man made responses, but instead to continuous “static” from the stars. That cosmic radio noise exists was realized as far back as 1931. Early records proved it to be most intense when receivers probed toward the Milky Way, or lengthwise through our enormous watch-shaped galaxy.

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