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Sports
Bicycle Tobogganing Is New Winter Sport (Mar, 1922)

Bicycle Tobogganing Is New Winter Sport

BICYCLE toboggans are adding new thrills to winter sports in Europe, where a strap-iron frame resembling a bicycle in shape, but equipped with broad iron runners instead of wheels, has made its appearance on the hills.

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The SPIN SHOTS of TABLE TENNIS (Nov, 1936)

The SPIN SHOTS of TABLE TENNIS

By Coleman Clark

Former National Champion OF ALL the games in which a ball is used, table tennis by all odds is the “spinniest.”

Willie Hoppe, the billiard wizard, puts plenty of “English” on the cue ball and Dizzy Dean flicks his wrist and manipulates his ringers as he whizzes the revolving ball through the air to get his “up-shoots,” “outs,” “ins” and “drops.” Every golfer knows one sort of spin makes his ball slice and a different one brings about a hook. Smart lawn tennis players consciously impart certain spins or twists to the ball to force their opponents into errors. Even top-notch bowlers get more strikes if they roll “hooks” by a simple twist of the wrist as the ball leaves their fingers.

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Golfer Sights Green in Thirty-Foot Periscope (Nov, 1936)

Golfer Sights Green in Thirty-Foot Periscope
When hazards are mountain-high, a golfer really needs a periscope. There is one hole on the Aberdovey course in North Wales where the green, only 165 yards away, is quite out of sight and it’s not safe to drive until you have peeked in the periscope to learn whether the foursome ahead has putted down and moved out of the way. The periscope is thirty feet high. Sand hills form the natural hazard that obscures the view from the tee.

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SNOWSHOE-SHAPED RACKET MAKES TENNIS EASIER (Mar, 1935)

SNOWSHOE-SHAPED RACKET MAKES TENNIS EASIER
Designed to distribute strain evenly, a curious new tennis racket has made its appearance in England. The shape of its frame suggests that of a snowshoe. Branching arms form a “V” with a short handle at their bottom and a webbed oval for striking the ball is enclosed between them at the top. The inventor of the new racket is F. W. Donisthorpe, professional tennis champion of Great Britain in 1924-1925 and an internationally famous player of the game.

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Rubber Clubs Add Zest to Golf (Jun, 1930)

Rubber Clubs Add Zest to Golf

A NEW type of rubber driver holds the interest of Harvey Firestone, Sr., rubber magnate, shown here with James Thomson, of New York, at Ormond Beach, Fla. This is the type of club which Mr. Firestone is using in his play against the elder John D. Rockefeller. The head of the driver is faced with wood over lead filling.

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Belgian General Learns to Bat (Mar, 1922)

Belgian General Learns to Bat

GENERAL JACQUES, of the Belgian army, received a lesson in batting from an expert during his stay in America, when Babe Ruth showed the famous soldier how to “line ‘em out.” The Babe demonstrated where to meet the ball, how to stand at the plate, and how to swing.

The general proved to be an apt pupil for a man who had never had his hands on a baseball, and is said to have knocked out a couple of creditable hits. His lessons in batting, however, were not extensive enough to put him in the home run class.

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100,000 See Soap Box Derby (Nov, 1936)

100,000 See Soap Box Derby

President M. J. Coyle presents the Soap Box Derby Trophy to Herbert Muench while the American runner up, Harold Hansen, and the International runner-up, Norman Neumann, of South Africa, look on.

Mrs. Herbert E. Muench happily embraces her son, Herbert, winner of the 1936 Soap Box Derby. Representing a St. Louis newspaper, young Muench set a pace of 39 miles per hour over a 1,100 foot course. His time was 28.2 seconds for the run, just two seconds faster than the runner-up, Harold Hansen, of White Plains, New York. The Derby was sponsored by the Chevrolet Motor Co. and 116 newspapers.

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Breaking Balloon With Stick at 50 M.P.H. Is New Sport (Nov, 1929)

Breaking Balloon With Stick at 50 M.P.H. Is New Sport

STEADY nerves and a keen eye are required to accomplish this trick shown at left. This young woman is poking a four-foot stick at a toy balloon while driving her car 50 m.p.h. past the pole on which the balloon is mounted. The stick is pointed at one end with a sharp piece of metal so that when a “strike” is made score can be kept by counting the number of balloons broken.

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Bike Riding on Tight Wire Is Latest in Hollywood Fads (Sep, 1933)

I think the Modern Mechanix definition of a fad is “something somebody did once”.

Bike Riding on Tight Wire Is Latest in Hollywood Fads
RIDING her bicycle along the popular beach at Venice, California, near Hollywood was too tame a pastime for Billie Yuill, so with Isabelle Becker to help her maintain her balance she tried out the stunt illustrated. Taking the tires off the wheels of her bike and with Isabelle in a rope swing underneath her “bike,” she rode the lifeline along the beach.

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NEW FOOT PADDLES MAY MAKE SWIMMING EASIER (Jul, 1934)

NEW FOOT PADDLES MAY MAKE SWIMMING EASIER

Easier swimming is said to be possible with a set of foot-paddles, recently invented. Fitted to the soles of special sandals, the paddles spread out with a downward or backward thrust of the leg and close with a forward or upward movement. They will be found especially helpful, it is believed, to water polo players and others who must make quick movements in the water or who find it necessary to tread water for long periods.

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