Archive
Automotive
RACING CAR TAKES THE LEAP FOR LIFE AT 100 M. P. H. (Feb, 1929)

RACING CAR TAKES THE LEAP FOR LIFE AT 100 M. P. H.

WHILE roaring around the Motor Parkway track at Mineola, Long Island, New York, the racing car of William Darragh took matters of direction into its own hands. Darragh was taking part in a six-lap elimination race at the Mineola Fair. During the second lap his car skidded, and rearing like a broncho slammed into an adjacent iron fence.

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“Wind Wagon” Made From Ford (Feb, 1932)

That used to be my nick name in high-school. I was a lonely child.

“Wind Wagon” Made From Ford
JOE BAIRD of Arcadia, Neb., got tired of driving an ordinary Model T Ford, so he got busy and converted it into the “wind wagon” shown above. The motor is raised above the chassis, the radiator turned sideways, and a four-blade propeller attached to drive the vehicle.

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New Racing Cars Do Four Miles a Minute (Jan, 1929)

New Racing Cars Do Four Miles a Minute

By RAY F. KUNS

FOUR hundred feet in the wink of an eyelid—that’s what the modern racing car can do! The story of the development of these 250 mile an hour cars is fascinatingly told here by Mr. Kuns, who knows the racing game as few men do.

EIGHT MILES an hour, 20 miles an hour, then 30, 40, 50, 75, a hundred —and now 250 miles an hour, or more than four miles a minute! This is the incredible accomplishment of the racing automobile, which was born upwards of 30 years ago and which today has attained a degree of perfection undreamed of by Barney Oldfield, Ralph DePalma, or those other daredevil drivers of the old dirt tracks!

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Propeller-Drive CAR has VANE Control (Sep, 1931)

Propeller-Drive CAR has VANE Control

CARRYING the development of air driven automobiles a step farther, Emil Sohn, a Berlin aviation engineer, has invented a motor car that secures high flexibility of control from power of an airplane motor and twin propellers located in the rear, in the position of the rumble seat.

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New Motorized Office and Hotel For Traveling Executive (Dec, 1930)

New Motorized Office and Hotel For Traveling Executive

A COMPLETE executive office and comfortable living quarters have been combined into a single motor bus body by Fred D. Martin, an executive of a linen supply firm in the Southwest. He uses the vehicle to visit the branches of the company in which he is interested, thus being able to conduct routine business while en route.

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THE MI URBASPORT TRI-MAGNUM: HOME-BUILT EXCITEMENT (Feb, 1983)

THE MI URBASPORT TRI-MAGNUM: HOME-BUILT EXCITEMENT

By Robert Q. Riley and Dave L. Carey

WITH almost a decade of safety-and energy-conscious cars under our belts, we Americans have learned to accept the econobox theory of automotive engineering. What used to be one of our greatest pleasures—the car—has become a mundane, utilitarian device for economically carrying people and things from place to place.

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Inventor Makes Propeller-Driven Tricycle (Nov, 1928)

Inventor Makes Propeller-Driven Tricycle

A THREE-WHEELED vehicle constructed of airplane parts and powered by a two-cylinder motor and small propeller has been designed by John Dacy, a young inventor of Zion City, Ill.

The rear part of the machine consists of an airplane landing gear on which is mounted the motor and propeller. In front of this is the pilot’s seat, suspended from a frame of steel tubing. The lone front wheel is connected by chain and wire to the steering apparatus.

The propeller develops tremendous pushing power and gives the machine such high speed that its owner has no fear of traffic officers.

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Garage ‘Without WALLS for Car Parking (Jun, 1931)

Garage ‘Without WALLS for Car Parking

A TYPE of garage built on entirely new lines has been designed and patented by Samuel Eliot, a real estate operator and building manager of Boston, Mass. Known as a “cage garage,” it is an open-air parking space stepped up three or four stories, with no side-walls or windows, no heat, no elevators or electric lighting.

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SOMETHING NEW on WHEELS (Sep, 1930)

SOMETHING NEW on WHEELS

THERE’S more than one way of getting there, in fact, almost every day brings us something new in the way of transportation. Here we have a child’s two-passenger electric lighted foot power car, the storage battery under the hood supply the juice.

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New Uses for Old Fords Contest! (Jan, 1929) (Jan, 1929)

New Uses for Old Fords Contest!

MODERN MECHANICS will pay $10 for acceptable photos of every odd use to which old model T Fords have been put. The queer machines shown below are made from old “Tin Lizzies.”

UP IN Minnesota where the water is sky blue many sportsmen sojourn during the summer. These same sportsmen use motorboats and demand clear, weedless lakes from their hotel and resort keepers.

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