Archive
Automotive
Automatic “Prodder” Keeps Driver Awake (Sep, 1948)

Automatic “Prodder” Keeps Driver Awake

Falling asleep at the wheel is just about impossible when an automatic “prodder” is worn by the driver. The prodder consists of an alertness indicator developed at Tufts College of Psychology. The driver wears a headband containing electrodes that measure alertness. When drowsiness sets in and sleep threatens, the electrodes signal to the indicator which sets off a warning buzzer that instantly arouses the driver.

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Full-Length Sleeping Cot Rests on Top of Automobile Seats (Aug, 1954)

Full-Length Sleeping Cot Rests on Top of Automobile Seats

Now the traveler can install a relief bunk in his car — an aluminum cot that extends above the seats from front to rear. While one person drives the other can sleep in full-length comfort. Made of lightweight tubing, the cot is supported by legs resting above the instrument panel, on top of the two seats, and on the rear-window ledge. It is quickly removed or installed and can be folded for storage. When folded, it is easily packed into place along with any reasonable amount of luggage. The bed can be adjusted for use as a regular cot.

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Speedy Motor-Cycle Car Runs on Two Wheels (Jun, 1939)

Speedy Motor-Cycle Car Runs on Two Wheels
WHETHER it’s a car or a motor cycle would be hard to say, but the inventor of the novel vehicle above declares it has the advantages of both. In motion, it rides upon two wheels, guided by a steering wheel. The driver experiences a pleasant swaying sensation as the machine tips like a plane or motor cycle for the turns. When the driver stops, a pedal lowers a pair of small auxiliary wheels at the sides for support. The photograph shows the odd gas buggy being driven by a mechanic in a tryout run at Miami, Fla. Another model has a seat for a passenger mounted behind that of the driver.

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Specially Designed Trucks Speed Door-to-Door Deliveries (Mar, 1933)

Specially Designed Trucks Speed Door-to-Door Deliveries

Automobiles are about to threaten the last stand of the horse and wagon. New trucks designed especially for door-to-door deliveries have been introduced almost simultaneously by several makers, to speed the milkman, the baker, and others on their daily rounds. Their controls are ingeniously simplified so that the driver may step aboard and drive standing up. One model has a removable power plant that may be quickly replaced with a spare.

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SPHINX SERVES PATRONS AT GASOLINE STATION (Feb, 1932)

This is the coolest gas pump ever.

SPHINX SERVES PATRONS AT GASOLINE STATION
Like water flowing from fountain statuary, gasoline spouts from the mouth of a model Sphinx in London, England. An enterprising owner of a filling station, desiring to attract the attention of passing motorists, had a gasoline pump erected in the form of the famous Egyptian figure. Many drivers have stopped first out of curiosity and became regular patrons.

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USE CAR’S EXHAUST TO CLEAN CUSHIONS (Feb, 1932)

USE CAR’S EXHAUST TO CLEAN CUSHIONS
Using the exhaust gas of the automobile to clean the upholstery is the accomplishment of a recently invented device. An aluminum attachment is fastened to the exhaust pipe and the engine is allowed to idle. As the exhaust gas passes through this device suction is created at the inlet hole. Collected by a nozzle, the dust and dirt are drawn through the hose and expelled into the air at the rear of the car. It is made in three models, for cars of different size.

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Auto Repairing Is Taught to Girls of Eastern High School (Oct, 1924)

Auto Repairing Is Taught to Girls of Eastern High School

Automobile repairing- has been added to the curriculum for girls at Eastern high school, Washington, D. C, where it is said to have proved a popular study among those students. They are taught the fundamental principles of the gas engine, its operation and repair and how to assemble a motor. The instftution is believed to be the first one of its kind to add the course exclusively for girls.

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Ventilator for Auto Trunk Makes It Safe for Dogs (Aug, 1938)

Ventilator for Auto Trunk Makes It Safe for Dogs
Hunters’ dogs and other pets can be carried safely in the automobile trunk if a ventilator is provided. A vent which resembles the cap of the gasoline tank can be installed at the side of the trunk, well above the exhaust fumes. It is adjustable so that the proper supply of air can be supplied the dogs in warm or cold weather.

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Air Driven Auto Goes Eighty Miles an Hour (Dec, 1932)

Air Driven Auto Goes Eighty Miles an Hour
Climbing steep hills covered with slippery ice is only one of the feats claimed possible for a curious air-driven automobile recently tested at Detroit, Mich. A four-bladed propeller, driven by a 100-horsepower engine, pulls it along like a tractor airplane. With a wheelbase of 132 inches and a weight of approximately 1,500 pounds, the strange machine is said to reach eighty miles an hour and cover thirty miles on a gallon of fuel. Because the wheels roll free and do not drive the car, it is not necessary for them to grip the ground as on a conventional machine.

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120 Miles an Hour with Seven Horsepower (Mar, 1933)

120 Miles an Hour with Seven Horsepower
More like a war tank than a racing car appears the. seven-horsepower machine just completed for George Eyston, noted British racer. Its design is expected to permit speeds in excess of two miles a minute. The driver sits enclosed within a streamlined, cabin-like frame of steel fitted with windows of mica. He wears a suit of asbestos as a fire precaution, and breathes through a contrivance resembling a gas mask to avoid-the carbon monoxide gas that might leak into the cockpit. There is also a dust chimney to carry away from the conning tower dirt kicked up by the wheels and prevent the windows from becoming obscured. Veteran racers say an attempt at 120-mile speed in so small a car is more dangerous than an assault, with a heavier machine, upon the world’s auto speed record.

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