Archive
Automotive
Americans Roll Their Own (Aug, 1946)

Americans Roll Their Own

THIS HYBRID suggests what can happen when aircraft parts are employed in making an automobile. Jack Norvell of Los Angeles used an increased gear ratio, a long chassis, and dual radiators, one on each side just forward of the rear wheels. Note the excellent visibility afforded the driver. In preliminary tests Norvell reached a speed of 131 m.p.h, with a Chrysler engine.

FEATHERWEIGHT is the word for the little car at the right. It weighs 500 lb., just about one fifth as much as the standard jeep. Emery Kent, of Wichita Falls, Texas, the builder, made many of the parts by hand. He tells of getting 50 miles to the gallon, and 50 m.p.h, top speed.

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INSTRUMENTS PUT ON AUTOS HOOD (Aug, 1933)

INSTRUMENTS PUT ON AUTOS HOOD
So he can read the dials of his car’s instruments without taking his eyes from the road, a Binghampton, N. Y., engineer has redesigned his car and placed them on the hood. A streamline housing for the meters gives the car a distinctive appearance. At night the dials are illuminated by a small light on a standard just in front of the windshield. Hinges of special design are attached to the hood, enabling it to be swung clear of the instrument panel when lifted to fill the crankcase or inspect the engine.

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Rear-Engine Car Looks Like Bus (Feb, 1949)

Rear-Engine Car Looks Like Bus
Assembled entirely from standard parts and sub-assemblies, a rear-engine automobile called the Mustang has been introduced in Seattle as the newest entry in the low-price field. The car, which seats six, two in front and four in back, is designed to sell for $1235. It has a four-cylinder, 59-horsepower Hercules engine. The power unit, consisting of engine, transmission and rear axle, slides out for repair when the body is raised. A door in the body just ahead of the rear wheel provides access to the engine for servicing. There is a large luggage compartment in the rear. The buslike front end provides excellent visibility for front-seat occupants

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A Speedy Three-Wheel Auto (Feb, 1932)

A Speedy Three-Wheel Auto
A TINY home-made automobile recently was built by R. H. Griffin of San Diego. The car is powered by a four-cylinder motor which drives it through the rear wheel. Driver enters through front.

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TURTLELIKE CAR BUILT OF OLD PARTS (Jul, 1933)

TURTLELIKE CAR BUILT OF OLD PARTS
From spare auto and motorcycle parts, a Chicago mechanic has built a freak vehicle which he calls a “turtle on wheels.” The total cost, he says, was about twenty-five dollars. Made of corrugated metal, the turtle-shell body extends beyond the wheels on each side, reducing wind resistance. On country highways, according to the builder of the strange machine, the little car makes forty-five miles an hour, driven by a motor placed at the rear. A special triangle of bumpers protects it.

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1933 Marvels of the Auto Speed World (Jun, 1933)

1933 Marvels of the Auto Speed World

Great things are stirring in the speed world! Streamlined race cars, modified stock car speed creations, incredibly fast custom-built racers for assaults against time, are all parts of the changing picture of the most heart-gripping, thrilling sport in the world today—auto racing!

by ROBERT M. ROOF and LEW HOLT

WITH a new automobile speed record of 273 miles an hour recently established by Malcolm Campbell, the internationally famous British speed king, and with several new speed creations along novel lines being groomed for entry in the forthcoming Memorial Day racing classic at Indianapolis, 1933 seems destined to be written down large in speedway history.

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CAR’S STEERING WHEEL IS INSTRUMENT PANEL (Mar, 1933)

CAR’S STEERING WHEEL IS INSTRUMENT PANEL
All the instruments needed for ordinary driving are mounted directly on a new automobile steering wheel. In this position they are plainly visible. Connections to the instruments are led through the hollow post of the wheel.

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NEW CAR LOCK THWARTS THIEF (Sep, 1934)

At least until the invention of the Bic Pen.

NEW CAR LOCK THWARTS THIEF
Using a cylindrical key, a recently marketed auto-bile lock for doors or ignition is said to afford protection against thieves. A thief attempting to open the lock would have to pick each of its seven plungers separately. Drilling or shearing off the lock is said to be impossible because of the hardened steel shell. The lock does not bear a number, a secret number being furnished the owner. Duplicate keys can be obtained from the factory only on presentation of the complete lock, which prevents thieves from securing a duplicate key for unlawful use.

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FIRE ESCAPE TRAP IN TOP OF AUTO (Sep, 1933)

It’s all in the name. Once they changed the name of this from “FIRE ESCAPE” to “sun roof” sales took off.

FIRE ESCAPE TRAP IN TOP OF AUTO
A motor car with a fire escape is a novelty introduced by a British inventor. The top of the car is cut away to provide a large rectangular aperture, which is normally closed by a fitted panel that excludes rain and snow. If an accident should turn the car on its side, however, the panel automatically falls out, thus allowing the occupants to escape or be helped out quickly. In case of fire following a collision, the inventor declares, his innovation would be an invaluable aid to life-saving and would probably greatly reduce the number of serious injuries that occur when driver is trapped in car.

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He’s the Audubon of the Automobile (Mar, 1954)

He’s the Audubon of the Automobile

C. P. Hornung stalks the rare and early birds of motordom and draws their portraits.

By George H. Waltz Jr.

AMERICANS scarcely knew one bird from another, unless they were edible, until John James Audubon painted their portraits, exact to the tiniest speckled feather.

Now a whole generation of car-loving Americans is getting acquainted with the gaudy and gleaming automobiles of the past—some of them very rare birds indeed—because a modern Audubon is drawing painstakingly authentic pictures of them.

Clarence P. Hornung of New York City, whose gallery of America’s earliest cars already includes 75 portraits, didn’t take up the hobby that has become his booming business until 1949. Until then he was an industrial artist and specialist in creating trademarks and package designs.

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