Archive
Automotive
Flying Auto (Jun, 1946)

If you keep the original formatting, the first line is “Flying Auto kills two”. That would explain why it’s “not yet ready to be placed on the market”.

Popular Science did a much more comprehensive article on the car.  They at least mentioned the inventor’s name. It was designated as the Convair 116 which led to the Convair 118.

Flying Auto kills two birds with one stone. Minus the wing and tail structure it is an automobile; with them, it becomes a creditable flying machine. The two-passenger plane is still in the experimental state so far, and is not yet ready to be placed on the market.

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PIN-UP CAR – 1949 MASERATI A6 TURISMO COUPE (Sep, 1954)

PIN-UP CAR – 1949 MASERATI A6 TURISMO COUPE

Owner: Major Charles W. Audet, North Hollywood, Calif. Engine: 6-cylinder, single overhead camshaft, 1500-cc, 65 hp @ 4700 rpm. Aluminum body by Farina. Tubular frame. Weight 2,156 pounds. Wheelbase 100 inches. Original cost $6,250. Top speed 95 mph.

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1934 Duesenberg / 195? Chrysler (Dec, 1952)

In regards to the C200, it never became available beyond a concept car due to declining automobile sales.

1934 Duesenberg

THE most fabulous American stock car ever manufactured was the incomparable Duesenberg Model J, a magnificent 265-horsepower job that could do 89 mph in second gear and 116 in high. Built strictly for the carriage trade that wanted and could pay for the very finest (the chassis cost $8,500; custom bodies ranged from $2,500 to $16,500), less than 500 of these great cars were made at the Indianapolis factory during the company’s short (1929-37) productive span.

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Autos to be Powered BY RADIO (May, 1929)

Autos to be Powered BY RADIO

AUTOMOBILES which will be driven by electric motors receiving their power through centrally located transmitting stations are predicted for the future by G. M. Williams, president of the Marmon Motor Car Company, who predicts that the present type of gasoline driven auto will be obsolete before the twentieth century is over. Automobile engineers are said to be already designing radio-operated cars.

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Fat Herman’s Chariot (Nov, 1954)

Fat Herman’s Chariot

WHEN Corporal Richard Dutot of New Hyde Park. L. I., was stationed in Germany, he was bitten by the car bug after riding in a German friend’s Mercedes-Benz—one of four cars that was made especially for former Nazi Air Marshal, Herman Goering.

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Worn Auto Parts Skeleton Shows Need For Lubrication (Nov, 1938)

Worn Auto Parts Skeleton Shows Need For Lubrication
WORN parts from a discarded automobile mounted on a board to represent a skeleton as a lesson in the need for correct lubrication for automobiles) reminds patrons in a Green Bay, Wisconsin, gas station not to overlook the value of oil and grease in their cars.

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New Type of Taxicab in Service (Feb, 1930)

That’s an interesting place to put the engine…

New Type of Taxicab in Service

QUITE an aid for congested districts is this German three-wheeled taxicab, recently exhibited in motor shows in Europe. The cab is very easy to handle in traffic.

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MI PIN-UP CAR: 1900 WHITE STANHOPE STEAMER (Nov, 1956)

MI PIN-UP CAR: 1900 WHITE STANHOPE STEAMER

Owner: Jerry Foley, Jacksonville, Fla. Engine: 2-cylinder double-acting steam engine, 6 brake horsepower. Wheelbase: 66 in. Weight: 1,100 lbs. Top speed: approximately 60 mph. Said to be oldest White Steamer in the U. S. Original cost was $1,000.

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NEW SAFETY HARNESS (Nov, 1955)

NEW SAFETY HARNESS

At least four famous racing drivers owe their lives to this simple 2-1/2-pound safety gadget.

FOUR Lincoln crew members of the recent Pan American-Mexican Road Race attribute their lives to the new Pacific Harness Safety Reel which bolts to the car’s floor. Attached to a shoulder harness, the reel allows cable to feed in or out, giving the driver freedom of movement up to 18 inches. But in an emergency, the reel locks instantly and automatically, snubbing the driver within just one-half inch of travel—perhaps saving his life.

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THE NEW MG (Jan, 1954)

THE NEW MG
MG for ’54 has been restyled and hopped up. Restyling in the new model, which is called the MG TF, is especially evident forward of the windshield, where the hood has been sloped down to a V-shaped radiator and the headlights have been faired into the front fenders. A higher compression ratio, twin carburetors, and other modifications have increased power output from the 54 hp at 5,200 rpm that was developed in the MG TD to 57.5 hp at 5,500 rpm. With disk wheels, the TF sells in this country for about $2,200; wire wheels are optional.

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