Archive
Aviation
Speedy Sled From Wrecked Plane (Jun, 1931)

Speedy Sled From Wrecked Plane

WHERE do good airplanes go when they die? Here’s one that was reincarnated in the form of an ice sled, and is now capable of making 75 miles an hour over frozen Lake St. Clair near Detroit.

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Cylinders Replace Wings in Plane (Feb, 1934)

Cylinders Replace Wings in Plane
Jets of air, sucked in at the front and expelled at the rear of huge tubes, are the unconventional means advanced by a Glen-dale, Calif., inventor for lifting and propelling an airplane. He has designed and patented a wingless craft, employing this principle, which he maintains will be able to rise and descend vertically and to hover motionless aloft.

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Know Your War Planes (Jan, 1942)

Know Your War Planes

The engines push instead of pull—
Three wheels for short alighting;
Two cannon and machine guns too,
Keep Airacuda fighting!

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Ten Miles High in an AIR-TIGHT BALL (Aug, 1931)

If it began to leak then the ball wasn’t exactly air-tight…
Also, with its tethers attached the capsule looks a lot like one of the tripods from War of the Worlds.

Ten Miles High in an AIR-TIGHT BALL

A HUGE yellow balloon soared skyward, a few weeks ago, from Augsberg, -Germany. Instead of a basket, it trailed an air-tight black-and-silver aluminum ball. Within Prof. Auguste Piccard, physicist, and Charles Kipfer aimed to explore the air 50,000 feet up.

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Airplane Field for Tall City Buildings (Oct, 1937)

This is one of those incredibly bad ideas that everyone seemed to have at the same time. Maybe it had to do with the coincidence of a fad for aviation and one for skyscrapers. Whatever the reason, they never really address the catastrophic consequences of a crash, nor the problems of traffic management.

Airplane Field for Tall City Buildings

New invention is expected to solve the problem of providing aviation facilities for large cities. Platforms are designed to operate on the roofs of large buildings and permit happy landings and easy take-offs.

AN invention of J. Herbert Jones of Brooklyn, N.Y., is expected to revolutionize the problem of airplane landings and take-offs in restricted areas, such as on the tops of large buildings, decks of ships, water fronts along the coast, or small land areas.

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NEW THRILLS FROM WINGED BICYCLE (Dec, 1930)

NEW THRILLS FROM WINGED BICYCLE

Part, at least, of the thrill of gliding can be had by bicycle riders whose machines are equipped with wings and tailpiece. This glider outfit is the invention of Harry T. Nelson, Dallas, Texas, World War flyer. It consists of small wings and a tailpiece that, he says, can be readily attached to any bicycle.

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Bensen BUILD-IT YOURSELF ONE-MAN COPTER (Feb, 1965)

Bensen BUILD-IT YOURSELF ONE-MAN COPTER

AIR FORCE CAPTAIN SAYS: “The simple construction and autorotation feature undoubtedly make this aircraft one of the safest in the air today.” Detailed plans and kits available. 3-View Drawings, specs, photo $2, or Copter-Glider $1. Order now!

Send $1 or $2

BENSEN AIRCRAFT CORP., Dept. PS-25
Raleigh-Durham Airport, Raleigh, N. C.

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Thrills of the Flying Sailors (Jul, 1940)

Thrills of the Flying Sailors

A VETERAN NAVY PILOT DESCRIBES LIFE ON OUR AIRCRAFT CARRIERS

By Lieut. Comdr. DON F. SMITH

THE author, at present in command of the Floyd Bennett Field Naval Reserve Base in New York City, has had more than 5,000 hours of flying in every type of Naval aviation squadron. Of his twenty-three years in the Navy, nine have been spent piloting swift pursuit ships and powerful dive-bombers from the decks of Uncle Sam’s giant floating airports, the aircraft carriers.

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What’s New in AVIATION (Feb, 1947)

What’s New in AVIATION

P-51 GETS A BOOST. When the Army recently experimented on a Mustang fighter (above), it installed two ram-let engines on its wing tips. The jets don’t start working until the P-51 hits 350 m.p.h.

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How the Navy Trains Dirigible Pilots (Mar, 1932)

How the Navy Trains Dirigible Pilots

by John L. Coontz

Uncle Sam is the only nation to systematically train pilots for giant military dirigibles like Los Angeles and Akron.

“WHAT on earth are those men doing?” exclaimed a visitor to the Lakehurst, N. J. naval air station, as he watched several groups of men manipulating as many balloons in an open field.

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