Archive
Aviation
Guggenheim Safety Planes Feature Controllable Wings (Mar, 1930)

Guggenheim Safety Planes Feature Controllable Wings

By MAJOR R. W. SCHROEDER

Editor’s Note: Major R. W. Schroeder, head of the Curtiss Flying Service in the mid-west, former chief test pilot of the army, and former world’s altitude record holder, was one of the contestants in the $100,000 safe aircraft competition initiated by the Guggenheim Fund. He set a world’s altitude mark several years ago in a sensational flight in which his plane fell five miles out of control after the major’s eyeballs had frozen.

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SEADROMES to DOT the ATLANTIC OCEAN (Feb, 1930)

SEADROMES to DOT the ATLANTIC OCEAN

AN experimental model has proved a success, plans are now being made for the anchoring between New York and Bermuda of the first seadrome for ocean flying airplanes and it is the hope of the supporters that as a result such seadromes will eventually dot the oceans providing safe landings for aircraft.

The one-ton steel model of the seadrome was placed in the Choptank River at Cambridge, Md. The model was one-thirty-second the size of the intended dromes.

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Octagonal Hangar Houses Planes Without Waste Space (Dec, 1929)

Octagonal Hangar Houses Planes Without Waste Space

WHENEVER a new aviation field or airdrome is planned there always arises the problem as to the type of hangar which should be erected. If the aviation field is planned for a small town or for a limited number of planes the problem is simple but when a modern airdrome with unlimited aerial traffic is contemplated, conditions are different.

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The LINDBERGHS Learn to GLIDE (May, 1930)

The LINDBERGHS Learn to GLIDE

by CLYDE FREEMAN

Colonel Charles A. Lindbergh and Mrs. Lindbergh now hold licenses as first class glider pilots, having completed a series of lessons in the Bowlus sailplane, plans for which were recently published in Modern Mechanics. The Colonel enthusiastically declares gliding to be the finest sport he knows.

ON TWO exciting days recently from hills adjacent to San Diego, California, Colonel and Mrs. Charles A. Lindbergh in a sailplane designed by William H. Bowlus. demonstrated the ease and facility with which persons untrained in gliding can learn to master a motorless craft.

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My New Dirigible on Pontoons (May, 1930)

My New Dirigible on Pontoons

by Lt.-Cmdr. C. D. BURNEY
Designer of Britain’s Giant R-101

Commander Burney, world authority on dirigibles, pens this revealing story of a startling new idea in lighter-than-air craft. Squat, elliptical, double hulled, hangarless—seagoing and self sufficient, the new ship on pontoons conceived by the designer of the R-101, is the solution to profitable ocean passenger trade.

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PLANES’ RADIO MESSAGES “CANNED” FOR DISASTER RECORD (Jul, 1937)

PLANES’ RADIO MESSAGES “CANNED” FOR DISASTER RECORD

RADIO communications between plane pilots and airport dispatchers are now permanently recorded on wax cylinders by an electrical machine recently installed by the U. S. Bureau of Air Commerce at a California landing field. Reports made by pilots and orders given by dispatchers, kept on file in record form, are thus available to examiners investigating the causes of any accident to a plane.

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ARMCHAIR PILOTS (Feb, 1947)

ARMCHAIR PILOTS

They fly babes with beeper boxes They’re not really armchair pilots, because they never fly from armchairs; they’re more likely to be in jeeps, or in “mother” planes. But the name does fit after a fashion, for these boys are nowhere near the planes they are flying. They are the Army Air Forces’ radio pilots. Wiggling levers on little five-pound boxes, they control huge four-motored giants that may be 50 miles away behind a cloudbank.

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The Car-Boat That Flies (Jun, 1956)

Aeromarine sounds like a color and that’s a pretty weak name for something that looks like it should be flown by G.I. Joe. I suppose this is reasonable considering that the inventor’s name is Skeets, but I think we can do better.

Maybe something more muscular, like “Car-BO-Plane” (over-hyphenation and making one word ALL CAPS was very popular in these mags). Or maybe something personal like “The Skeeter” or “Skeetsmobile”.

What do you think?

The Car-Boat That Flies

Skeets Coleman’s three-way gadabout will be a performing fool and as easy to pilot as a ’56 car.

THE GREAT advances in aircraft design of the past 15 years have had little effect on the looks or performance of the small private planes now being built; you could have landed any of them at a small airport in the mid-30′s without scaring anybody. But with Skeets Coleman’s Aeromarine design the field of private plane building may begin to catch up with the times.

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Todays man-about -the-world heads for gay South America (Mar, 1958)

Todays man-about -the-world heads for gay South America

A new day has dawned in travel. People who’ve been everywhere now talk of South America’s cities, scenery and lavish hotels—where dollars go a long, long way.

Lowest fares yet! For 30% off regular fares, you can go ’round South America on a gay 28-day pre-planned tour. $989 from New York, includes hotel rooms, local sightseeing, and you fly El Pacifico DC-6Bs. For slightly more, you can fly El Inter Americano DC-7s. Both have radar, fly daily over the routes of National, Pan Am and Panagra. Call your Travel Agent or Pan American, Sales Agent for—

PANAGRA
PAN AMERICAN-GRACE AIRWAYS

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This Helicopter-Car Flies Over Traffic! (Nov, 1941)

This Helicopter-Car Flies Over Traffic!

JESS DIXON, of Andalusia.

Ala., got tired of being tied up in traffic jams, so he designed and built this novel flying vehicle. It is a combination of automobile, helicopter, autogiro, and motorcycle. It has two large lifting rotos in a single head, revolving in opposite directions. It is powered by a 40 h.p. motor which is air-cooled. He claims his machine is capable of speeds up to 100 miles an hour.

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