Archive
Aviation
playing for keeps? (Jul, 1954)

playing for keeps?

Are you willing to stake the future on your belief in you… to match your ability against the toughest engineering challenge? Are you planning to go far in this business —and playing for keeps? If so, there may be a place for you here.

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British Build Largest Land Plane (Apr, 1931)

British Build Largest Land Plane

THE Handley-Page Company of England, which is building a fleet of gigantic ail-liners for the Imperial Airways, recently completed the first of these mammoth ships, which made a successful trial flight.

Seven other of these planes are now under construction.

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ROLL OUT THE: BURLAP! (Jun, 1945)

ROLL OUT THE: BURLAP!

by Gilbert Paust,
Mi’s Aviation Editor

The “stamplicker” rolls out long strips of coated burlap to form the latest in synthetic airstrips, the U.S. Army’s “Hessian Mat.”

A FACTOR in Allied victories on the Western Front has been the availability of airstrips for our fighters directly behind the battle lines.

Thanks to a new type of mat which resembles tar paper, Army engineers have been able to lay these emergency fields in record- breaking time.

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Tiny Airplane Folds Into Suitcase (May, 1929)

Tiny Airplane Folds Into Suitcase

DEPICTED in this month’s Modern Mechanics’ cover is the tiny bicycle type biplane which has been developed in France by M. Pischof.

The tiny biplane has a span of but 12 feet, weighs but 200 lbs., and is powered with a 4 h.p. opposed motor. This is evidently enough to give passable performance for the little ship was recently test flown by a grown man for a distance of 20 miles.

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SHE FLIES AND DIVES (Sep, 1915)

So, it’s an article about a woman who flies planes and goes diving, but most of the article is about who she marries. Typical.

The thing I don’t understand is the last sentence: “After his third wreck, the sinking of the S. S. Delhi, he claimed his bride.”

Does that mean he was on three separate ships that sank? Did he sink them? How is this relevant to the story?

SHE FLIES AND DIVES

AN odd compact came to fulfillment recently when Mrs. Alys McKey Bryant, the prominent aviatrice, married Jesse W. Callow, chief engineer of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. Years before, they had come to the agreement that if, at the expiration of ten years’ time both of them were free, they would marry.

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Two-Way Propellers Lessen Air Torque (Dec, 1941)

There have been a good number of aircraft that used contra-rotating propellers.

Two-Way Propellers Lessen Air Torque

THE latest development in airplane propellers, the product of English inventors, is called the Rotol Constant-Speed Contra-Rotating Airscrew, shown at the right. Although appearing to be a six-bladed propeller, the contrivance actually consists of two three-bladed propellers which rotate in opposite directions. Among the advantages claimed for the new type prop are complete elimination of torque and improved handling during aerial acrobatics.

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Cockpit PT (Jun, 1946)

Cockpit PT

Take a tip from the AAF and relax yourself with these exercises which are done while sitting down.

BY C. B. COLBY

THE next time you are on a long auto ride or plane flight with some chap who used to be in the Air Corps you may get a scare. He may suddenly hunch his shoulders, arch his back and then slump down in his seat, rotate his shoulders or violently nod his head back and forth. If this happens don’t bail out.

It’s not, combat fatigue, long woolen underwear or ants in his pants. He’s doing cockpit “PT’s” and a darn good habit it is, too.

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Metal Skins for AIRPLANES (Mar, 1931)

Metal Skins for AIRPLANES

by MAJOR H. H. ARNOLD

In the Plane Talk department this month Major Arnold discusses several important developments in aviation, several of which are of British origin.

EVERY day that passes sees more airplanes in which cloth and wood construction has been discarded and metal substituted. At first the metal was used in wing and fuselage truss construction only but recently metal sheets have found great favor as wing and fuselage covering.

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Approve New “Fool-Proof” Planes (Nov, 1936)

Approve New “Fool-Proof” Planes

TWO years ago, the Bureau of Air Commerce started a development program that had as its goal the production of a “foolproof” airplane at a cost of about $700. It was hoped that a low-cost, safe airplane would promote sport flying on a larger scale throughout the United States.

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AN INVENTOR’S DAUGHTER WHO RISKED HER LIFE TO TEST HER FATHER’S DEVICE (Sep, 1915)

Not that this wasn’t a compelling demonstration, but I think that the aviators might have been more reassured if his son, Tubs Brodwick had tested it instead.

AN INVENTOR’S DAUGHTER WHO RISKED HER LIFE TO TEST HER FATHER’S DEVICE

MISS TINY BRODWICK, an eighteen-year-old girl in San Diego, California, recently showed her faith in the safety parachute for aviators invented by her father, Charles Brodwick, by dropping to earth from a flying parachute. The feat occurred before a crowd of visitors at the San Diego Exposition, and the parachute worked in perfect fashion.

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