Archive
Aviation
Styles for Cold and Heat (Nov, 1934)

I never go anywhere without my asbestos parasol.

Styles for Cold and Heat

RIGHT, Wiley Post, world-girdling flyer, in a suit built for stratosphere trips. It is airtight and connectable to a super-charger on his engine; and will stand 100° below zero. Below, a London fireman in the newest asbestos suit to keep out flame. It seems like a case of extremes meeting.

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Daring Rocketmen to Invade the Stratosphere (May, 1934)

This reminds me of the ill-fated Rotary Rocket company.

Daring Rocketmen to Invade the Stratosphere

The rocket-shooters are going to pitch in again this coming summer. Undaunted by reverses and tragedies during the past year’s experiments, the rocketeers are tackling their work with renewed vigor and ambition, plus improved apparatus and chemicals.

Ernst Loebell, famous German engineer and rocket designer, promises to bring the rocket engines to their greatest point of achievement next summer. He is now in this country and is an active worker in the Cleveland Rocket Society.

Loebell has been carrying on bis preliminary experiments on the big Hanna estate in a suburb of Cleveland. In their operations the Cleveland group has been making use of the lessons taught by the experiments of Loebell’s countryman, the late Reinhold Tilling, a noted radio engineer and rocket builder.

Prior to his death. Tilling had been experimenting with rockets and rocket planes for months. The success of a rocket which reached a height of (6,000 feet in 1931 spurred him on to the construction of a rocket with glider wings which unfolded when the fuel was exhausted and brought the projectile gently to earth. This feat was hailed as one of the first practical steps toward the development of mail and passenger carrying rockets.

The Tilling rockets were set in motion by telignition from a distance of 100 yards. They attained a speed of 700 miles an hour and landed five miles from the starting point, in accordance with calculations. Herr Tilling was working on a system designed to manipulate his rockets by radio control when he and a female assistant were killed in the explosion of a rocket which they were charging.

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Build your own JET ENGINE! (Jan, 1952)

Build your own JET ENGINE!

Order these plans today
1. Jet Propelled Bicycle, Assemble your own. Photo and instructions, $1.00
2. How to make experimental jet engines. Seven sheets drawings with information and instructions $2.95
3. Both of above in one order $3.75.
SEND NO MONEY. Order both at once $3.75 C.O.D in USA plus c.o.d postage.
Send check or Money Order and we pay postage. Get other information too. Rush Order.

J. Houston Maupin, Dept. 55, Tipp City, Ohio

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Is Aerial Warfare Doomed? (Nov, 1934)

Needless to say, many of the predictions in this article didn’t pan out.

Is Aerial Warfare Doomed?

Original Editor’s Note – Statements by aviation enthusiasts that airplanes will wipe out cities, destroy fleets and armies, and win the next war prompted this article by Lieut. Hogg, noted writer on military topics. In it he makes startling revelations about the effectiveness of the airplane as a military weapon. The observations and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and should not be construed as reflecting the official views or opinions of the United States Navy Department.

Startling Statements About Aerial Warfare

During the World War airplanes sank no battleships, destroyed no city, and failed in every attempt to bomb or gas an enemy out of a military position.

The first 30 days of any major war will see the complete elimination of air forces of belligerent powers.

No aviator entertains the thought that he is going to fly over the enemy anti-aircraft battery in time of war – and live to tell the tale.

Air raids over London and Paris during the four years of the World War destroyed less than $5,000,000 worth of property and killed fewer than 700 enemy civilians.

It would take 75,000 bombers to carry the load of bombs equivalent to the weight of shells carried by the 15 battleships of the U. S. Navy. The cruising radius of those bombers would be only 500 miles. A battleship can travel 15,000 miles, regardless of weather.

A shell will drill through heavy armor plate, or through concrete walls. It explodes inside to produce a shattering, internal explosion. A aerial bomb, having no such power of penetration pops off like a paper firecracker against whatever it hits.

It would take 28,000,000 pounds of phosgene to “wipe out” an area the size of New York City. To accomplish this the enemy would have to have 14,000 large bombing planes and 280 naval airplane carriers to bring the planes within striking distance of New York.

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Egg-Beater Wind Plane Imitates Hovering Flight of Eagle (Oct, 1934)


Egg-Beater Wind Plane Imitates Hovering Flight of Eagle

Revolving blades resembling somewhat the working parts of an egg beater replace wings and tail stabilizers on the “cycloidal flying machine,” an airplane designed to reproduce the best features of an eagle’s flight.

A seven foot model of the unusual craft has already been built in the aeornautical laboratories of the University of Washington by its inventor, Dr. Frederick K. Kirsten. The novel wing mechanism is expected to give higher speeds, hovering flight, and slower landings.

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