Archive
Bicycles
Leg Power replaces electricity (May, 1945)

I don’t buy it. Hair dryers use a LOT of electricity. Plus, unless they have some sort of flywheel or intermediate battery, wouldn’t the power fluctuate if his speed alters?

Leg Power replaces electricity in this Parisian beauty salon, where Madame has her hair dried despite the lack of coal-generated current. An ingenious beautician hires unemployed 6-day bicycle racers to peddle away on a bike, the back wheel of which is attached to a small generator! The current runs 6 driers.

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ELEVEN BLIND MEN RIDE ONE BIG CYCLE (Jul, 1931)

ELEVEN BLIND MEN RIDE ONE BIG CYCLE

An odd-looking cycle that seemed to have some of the qualities of a railway train was seen on the roads near Upper Norwood, England, the other day. Its twelve riders pedaled along, seated in flexibly connected units of the “multicycle.” This centipede among vehicles is twenty-eight feet long, but its flexible connections enable it to turn corners easily. It was built for use by students at the Royal Normal College for the Blind. An attendant with normal vision steers it.

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Watercycle (Dec, 1950)

Watercycle
Like a strange bug, a homemade watercycle crawls across the surface of a lake or river. The weird craft was built by William Dein, an employee of the Republic Aviation Corporation. Dein purchased some surplus wing floats used on amphibious airplanes, fastened them together with a framework
and mounted part of a bicycle atop the structure. The operator pedals, and presto—the craft moves across the water.

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THREE-WHEEL “BIKE” DRIVES LIKE AN AUTO (Feb, 1936)

THREE-WHEEL “BIKE” DRIVES LIKE AN AUTO

Automobile, tricycle, and bicycle features are combined in an odd vehicle recently introduced. The “driver” sits in a comfortable chair seat and propels the car by a bicycle-type sprocket gear connected with the two front wheels. The machine is steered by the single rear wheel, turned by means of an automobile-type steering gear.

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RIDE A RANGER ALL THE YEAR ‘ROUND (Mar, 1924)

RIDE A RANGER ALL THE YEAR ‘ROUND

30 Days’ Free Trial

See for yourself the values found in Ranger bicycles with their complete equipment of accessories and extras. Send to-day for catalog and select the model you prefer. Ride it thirty days, test its speed, sturdy qualities, de luxe equipment and exclusive features. If at the end of thirty days you want to return it for any reason, send it back and you will not be out one cent.

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Bike Riding on Tight Wire Is Latest in Hollywood Fads (Sep, 1933)

I think the Modern Mechanix definition of a fad is “something somebody did once”.

Bike Riding on Tight Wire Is Latest in Hollywood Fads
RIDING her bicycle along the popular beach at Venice, California, near Hollywood was too tame a pastime for Billie Yuill, so with Isabelle Becker to help her maintain her balance she tried out the stunt illustrated. Taking the tires off the wheels of her bike and with Isabelle in a rope swing underneath her “bike,” she rode the lifeline along the beach.

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FREAK BIKE RUNS BY MOTION OF BODY (Nov, 1934)

FREAK BIKE RUNS BY MOTION OF BODY

A bicycle without pedals, invented by two Chicago men, is designed to operate on body motion alone. Standing on a springy footboard, a rider propels the strange vehicle simply by raising and lowering his body. The rear wheel of the bicycle has its axle mounted off center. A down-ward thrust of the legs tends, after the bicycle has been placed in motion, to pull this axle down to its lowest position, thus causing the wheel to revolve in a forward direction.

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Grindstone Attached to Bicycle (Mar, 1936)

Grindstone Attached to Bicycle

A man who makes a living grinding scissors, knives, etc., in the vicinity of Moreton, Cheshire, England has fitted his bicycle with a small grinding wheel, in accordance with the illustrations and description here given. For those who would like to go into this business, we outline the details. Two ordinary strips of iron, about 1″ wide and 1/8″ thick, are drilled to accommodate three bolts and a bicycle hub axle. By means of a bolt, the iron strips are fastened together at one end, and the strips spread by hand; a small piece of iron pipe is then dropped down close to the bend, and the strips are again squeezed together, first by hand and later with the vise. This forms a clamp for the bottom of the bicycle frame. The top cross-bar is properly located, and the iron bent around it in a similar way.

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“Electric Bike” (Jan, 1947)

“Electric Bike” above boasts a dynamo which stores energy while traveling downhill and releases it to provide power for climbing up grades. It was another of the 6,000 products exhibited at the “Britain Can Make It” show and was designed by B. G. Bowden.

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Landlubbers Hoist Their Sails and Go Yachting on Bikes (Dec, 1938)

Landlubbers Hoist Their Sails and Go Yachting on Bikes
Boats are nice, but not necessary for a sailing trip. Right in Miami, Fla., a city of yachtsmen, two youths who had bicycles but no boats hoisted their sails over the bikes and let the trade winds haul them down the drive.

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