Archive
Nautical
Sea-Going Diner Pays No Taxes (Apr, 1948)

Sea-Going Diner Pays No Taxes

BY TOM MCCAHILL

SAILORMEN of New York waters don’t die of thirst any- more, thanks to a new enterprise that pays no rent and no local taxes.

No, sir. When they’re a little parched they twist an ear until they pick up a few musical horn-toots. Then they jump up and wave their arms. A slick cruiser draws alongside. “What’ll you have?” asks a smiling cookie.

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Seaplanes Launched From Deck of Ship on Canvas Slide (Mar, 1930)

Seaplanes Launched From Deck of Ship on Canvas Slide

MAIL-STEAMERS not equipped with expensive catapults for launching airplanes at sea will welcome the invention of the Kiwull watersail, so named after its inventor, which is shown in operation in the above drawing. The invention is simple, consisting of a length of canvas 100 feet long and 32 feet wide which is unrolled from the stern of the ship, as shown, to form an incline down which a seaplane can be lowered to the water. The canvas is held taut by water pulling against a “drogue” or net at the trailing end. Seaplanes can also return aboard deck by this means.

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Ocean Skimmer for Atlantic (Mar, 1930)

Ocean Skimmer for Atlantic

Modern Mechanics’ cover this month depicts new adaptation of Alexander Graham Bell’s hydrofoil principle, showing new Atlantic “stepladder” liner.

AT LAST the “step ladder boats,” as the hydrofoil speeders planned by the son of Dr. Alexander Graham Bell have been called, are to make a bid for laurels as the fastest method of crossing the Atlantic.

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A Boy-Powered Submarine (Jan, 1932)

A Boy-Powered Submarine

By DEE ENGEL

Many of the towns lying along the Platte River are close to sand pits — depressions made when sand is dredged. These fill up with clear water and the sandy sloping bottoms make these various pools ideal for swimming and other water sports. Don Webb lives in Kearney, Nebraska, and of course there is an abundance of these miniature lakes close by; so Don built a sub which is manned by a couple of boys. And to say that they have a lot of fun with it is putting it mildly.

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The Sea-Gem: a 100mph Air-Cushion Ship by 1963 (Mar, 1962)

The Sea-Gem: a 100mph Air-Cushion Ship by 1963

By JAMES JOSEPH

NON-ELECTION year 1963 may nevertheless bring a spectacular inauguration.

Some time next year, America’s first air-cushion ship, the Sea-GEM (for sea-going ground effect machine) may streak New York to London on her maiden “flight.”

Riding 3 to 6 ft. above the waves on a frictionless cushion of air, the giant 100-ton craft will be propelled at better than 100 mph by four jet-prop pusher-type engines.

Part ship, part plane, and wholly revolutionary, the Sea-GEM promises its 100 first-flight passengers some surprises.

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Rum Runners Drag Cargo Under River (Jan, 1930)

Rum Runners Drag Cargo Under River

WHEN SLED WITH LOAD OF LIQUOR ARRIVES IN POSITION UNDERNEATH WHARF, DIVER DESCENDS AND FASTENS HOISTING CABLE TO CARGO. THE CONTENTS ARE THEN HAULED THROUGH A TRAPDOOR OPENING IN FLOOR OF WAREHOUSE

HAND WINCH SECRETED IN SHED ON CANADIAN SIDE OF RIVER PAYS OUT CABLE. LOADED SLED IS DRAWN OVER BED OF RIVER BY HIDDEN WINCH LOCATED IN WAREHOUSE ON THE DETROIT SIDE OF RIVER AND RUM IS THUS TRANSFERRED UNSEEN.

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Trapping the HARBOR Pirates (Mar, 1931)

Trapping the HARBOR Pirates

by ALFRED ALBELLI

The swaggering buccaneer of the Spanish Main, who defiantly floated the Jolly Roger from his masthead as he preyed upon the high seas, has passed forever. The modern pirate uses up to date methods and must be combated with the latest weapons.

IF YOU should sit of an evening in the eerie cabin of Captain Henry Malley’s ship, pride of the New York Police Department’s harbor flotilla, he would spin yarns of derring-do for you which would make your hair stand perpendicular. The subject would be harbor pirates.

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French Engineer Plans Huge Floating Mid-Ocean City (Mar, 1931)

It really seem that big. Also, what’s with all the Eiffel towers?

Though this would be perfect for Relativistic Statistical Arbitrage

French Engineer Plans Huge Floating Mid-Ocean City

WHEN the continents of the world have become overcrowded and trans-oceanic airplane travel is as common as travel by steamers at present, we may see the establishment of huge mid-ocean cities such as is shown in the above drawing, which illustrates the plans recently made by Leon Feoquinos, a French engineer of Marseilles.

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Sea-Going Pleasure Parks (Mar, 1931)

Sea-Going Pleasure Parks

Outdoor Sports on German Floating Amusement Palace

ONE of the most unique sea-going entertainment palaces in the world is the floating pleasure park being built by Louis Reinsch of Bad Reichenhall, Germany. As depicted on these pages and on the cover of this issue of Modern Mechanics and Inventions, Mr. Reinsch’s boat combines features of barge and ocean liner.

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DOCKING the Normandie With New York’s TUG FLEET (May, 1936)

DOCKING the Normandie With New York’s TUG FLEET

The Normandie, for all her great size and power, is one of the easiest of the big ships to handle, claims Anton Huseby, Norwegian captain of the Moran Fleet of New York Harbor tugboats, and the man responsible for docking this great liner. Last time he berthed her in 20 minutes —fast work on any vessel.

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