Archive
Nautical
Uncle Sam’s Pirate PATROL (Jan, 1930)

Uncle Sam’s Pirate PATROL

Fights every sort of danger from rum runners to derelict ships menacing navigation.

Thrilling adventures in fighting modern sea pirates; blowing up icebergs and derelicts; rescuing passengers and crews from wrecked vessels; pack the lives of daring United States coast guardsmen who are constantly on duty at dangerous points.

By JAMES NEVIN MILLER

“STICK ‘em up!”

Eight men, members of a Coast Guard patrol boat crew, were forced to obey this terse order on an afternoon not so long ago. Their situation was desperate.

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Will the Nautilus Freeze Under the North Pole? (Jun, 1931)

Will the Nautilus Freeze Under the North Pole?

by LEW HOLT

Within a few weeks Sir Hubert Wilkins and his crew of 18 will set forth to burrow under the North Pole in a submarine. Have they any chance of success, or is the expedition foolhardy—are the daring adventurers doomed to die, frozen beneath Polar ice? Read the opinions of experts.

THE most astonishing scientific expedition the world has ever known will get under way early this summer when the submarine Nautilus, under command of Sir Hubert Wilkins and Commander Sloan Danenhower, sets forth to burrow under the frozen Arctic seas which surround the North Pole

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Is America the Naval Disarmament Goat (Aug, 1930)

Is America the Naval Disarmament Goat

by JAY EARLE MILLER

When the big guns roar again for the next war, will America discover that her navy has been made a second-rate one by the terms of the disarmament treaty recently executed by the “Big Five” powers? Mr. Miller tells here just what the treaty means to national defense in terms of battleships, cruisers, and big guns.

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Nautilus May Meet Zeppelin at Pole (Aug, 1931) (Aug, 1931)

Nautilus May Meet Zeppelin at Pole
Details of the methods by which the Graf Zeppelin and the Nautilus, Sir Hubert Wilkins’ polar submarine, hope to complete at the North Pole the most amazing rendezvous in all history, are pictured in the above drawing. The map shows the route these craft will follow. The Nautilus, described in detail in last month’s issue of Modern Mechanics and Inventions, is now on its way to the North Pole.

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Can There Be Safely at Sea? (Feb, 1935)

Can There Be Safely at Sea?

SINCE the first bold man, voluntarily or involuntarily, trusted himself to a hollow log and floated out on the tide, there have been disasters at sea. In the old days, there was little that could be done, except to exercise what skill and precaution was possible with rude sailing craft, and to offer special prayers for those in danger on the deep.

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Take Long Swimming Cruise in New “Body Sailing Yacht” (Jan, 1933)

Take Long Swimming Cruise in New “Body Sailing Yacht”

WANT to take a nice long swim without exerting any muscle power? Then hook yourself up to this new “Body Sailing Yacht” which has just been introduced in Germany. A special bucket board that straps around your body holds the mast upright, your carcass acting as the hull of this unique windjammer.

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Side Car Serves as Boat (Jun, 1934)

Side Car Serves as Boat
A MOTORCYCLE side car which doubles as a canoe on trips to the beach or river bank has recently made its appearance in Germany. The car is fitted with small metal pontoons which keep it upright in the water. Future models will be fitted with rudders, completing the transformation from side car to a navigable boat.

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New Type of Flying Yacht Develops 85-Mile Speed (Jan, 1929)

New Type of Flying Yacht Develops 85-Mile Speed

AN UNUSUAL type of surf plane powered with a reclaimed wartime rotary airplane motor has been designed by Sol Messina, of New York. He expects his novel craft to develop a top speed of 85 miles an hour.

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Big Fish Caught By Electrocution (Sep, 1931)

Big Fish Caught By Electrocution

A CLEVER California fisherman, Capt. Guy Silva, has perfected a novel and efficient method of landing 200 and 300 pound fish with the minimum amount of labor.

He electrocutes them!

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Homemade Amphib (Feb, 1947)

Homemade Amphib

below can be pedalled across water at five knots and overland at a steady 18-mph, claims the man who built it, Norman Skyes of Cheshire, England.

It is made mostly of wood, has three wheels and can be mass-produced cheaply, he says.

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