Archive
Nautical
Tunnel-Hull Boat Won’t Roll (Nov, 1949)

Tunnel-Hull Boat Won’t Roll

GAR Wood, the silver-haired king of speedboat racing, has designed the most stable boat in the world.

The no-roll Venturi is 188 feet long and 40 feet wide, and has twin hulls which slice through the waves instead of climbing over them as do conventional craft. Propellers are 4-1/2 feet in diameter and extend below the hull, increasing draft at the stern to about 8 feet when underway.

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FAMILY YACHT FROM A LANDING CRAFT (Apr, 1956)

FAMILY YACHT FROM A LANDING CRAFT

He bought a LCVP from Navy surplus and from it fashioned this nifty “floating cottage.”

By Marylaird Wood

IT ALL began when Thomas L. Collins of Alameda, Calif., bought a LCVP from Navy surplus. The discarded landing craft sold for $24.00. It didn’t look much like a family boat but Tom thought it had possibilities.

Collins and his 14-year-old son, Tom, Jr., love the water. When they bought the LCVP they already owned a 30-foot sailboat but the problems of overnight accommodations, limited cabin space, and the fact that the ketch required a crew, took some of the fun from weekend sailing.

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DOWN GOES PICCARD! (Jan, 1947)

DOWN GOES PICCARD!

Yea, he’ll go down four miles BUT… will he come back up?

THE African sun slants its dawn rays across the Gulf of Guinea. From the deck of a ship a huge crane swings out over the water. Slowly it descends and with scarcely a ripple deposits the amazing thing on the ocean’s face.

Inside the Thing a little man with wide metal-rimmed glasses orders crisply: “Cut the ropes,” and the world’s strangest submarine, its only contact severed, begins it’s descent into the world of endless night in the ocean’s depths.

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BOAT RUNS ON SEA WATER (Aug, 1954)

BOAT RUNS ON SEA WATER

Free, unlimited electric power from the salty sea may soon replace gas, diesel engines in marine use.

EVERY so often someone comes up with an idea so simple and apparent that millions of Monday-morning quarterbacks promptly kick themselves and mutter “Now why didn’t I think of that?” Occasionally the idea is completely original. Usually, however, it is an old chestnut that has been kicked around until some bright lad finally dopes out a way to make it work. Ralph E. McCabe, designer and patentee of a practical, new salt water battery, does not claim to be the first to conceive the notion of extracting electric current from the ocean brine.

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MI’s Wonderful Car-Boat (Apr, 1957)

MI’s Wonderful Car-Boat

Turbine-powered cruiser of the future travels on either highway or waterway.

SOME DAY in the near future a long, sleek car with a bubble canopy will drive down to the water’s edge and then splash right in. Once afloat, its wheels will retract and the driver, shifting from gears to a jet thrust; w

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GUARDING AGAINST “SUPER-ENTHUSIASTS” (Jun, 1917)

Huh? Someone want to explain the headline?

GUARDING AGAINST “SUPER-ENTHUSIASTS”

One of the Armed Police Boats

These gasoline police launches, carrying machine guns and trained operators, now are scurrying back and forth in the waters of New York Harbor. Over one hundred veterans of the Spanish-American war-members of the force—are detailed to this duty, which is guarding the wharves and shipping against a repetition of the disastrous explosions and fires of the past few months.

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JET-STYLED model liner (Mar, 1957)

JET-STYLED model liner designed by German Dieter Jansen is powered by six miniature diesel engines. Ship can be radar guided and is said to travel 60 mph on calm water.

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Cheating TIME on the North Atlantic (Nov, 1928)

Cheating TIME on the North Atlantic

Crossing the Atlantic in 60 hours is the feat claimed possible by Remy, inventor of an ocean hydroglider! Contrast this with methods of travel as developed in the last two hundred years.

SPEED! Speed!! Speed!! Ever since the Pilgrims set foot on Plymouth Rock—ever since the days when Virginia was first colonized, there has been the cry among shippers for greater speed in crossing the stormy North Atlantic!

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Pontoon Boat Aims at 150-Mile Speed (Dec, 1932)

Pontoon Boat Aims at 150-Mile Speed

Strange Craft Has Tractor Propeller Under Its Cockpit and Draws Inch of Water

SAFE water travel, at speeds that only the most daring race pilots now attempt, is brought within reach of everyone by a radically new type of water craft. When suitable motors are installed, the inventor expects it to shatter all records and attain 150 miles an hour. Despite its swiftness, the airplane-shaped boat demonstrated extraordinary stability in its first trials on Long Island Sound, N. Y., the other day. It amazed marine experts among the spectators by turning around in its own length, at high speed, without upsetting.

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HELIUM METHOD RAISES SUNKEN TREASURE (Mar, 1938)

HELIUM METHOD RAISES SUNKEN TREASURE

HUGE fortunes in gold and gems lying in the holds of sunken ships are no longer beyond recovery now that a record-breaking descent of 420 feet has proved salvaging sunken treasures safe and practicable.

Gold-laden ships, previously barricaded by unconquerable depths, were literally swept into shallow water by the record depth Max Nohl reached recently preparatory to salvage efforts on the S. S. Lusitania and Merida.

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