Archive
Nautical
LARGEST SAILING SHIP IN THE WORLD (Feb, 1909)

LARGEST SAILING SHIP IN THE WORLD

By VICTOR GUILLON

THE German ship R. C. Rickmers which recently discharged a cargo of 40,000 barrels of cement at San Pedro, California, is the largest sailing vessel in the world. Some of her principal dimensions are: Length of deck, 441 feet; beam, 53 feet; draft, loaded, 27 feet; displacement, to load water line, 11,360 tons; sail area, 50,000 square feet.

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SOS Detective… (Mar, 1947)

SOS Detective…

Translating distress signals into beams of light, this Navy-developed rescue aid speedily plots the position of ships or planes in trouble at sea. Tiny camera projectors interpret bearings received from direction-finding stations; the intersection of their beams on the map indicates the position of the craft in distress. The dial above the chart automatically gives the course to the position.

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BOAT RUNS ON ROLLING DRUMS (Dec, 1932)

BOAT RUNS ON ROLLING DRUMS
A boat that runs along the surface of the water on drums was given a trial recently on the Hackensack River, near Newark, N. J. Five specially-designed white steel drums, having indentations like the treads on tires to increase their grip upon the water, support the craft.

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Ships Dock in Huge Mass of “Soap Bubbles” (Apr, 1960)

Ships Dock in Huge Mass of “Soap Bubbles”
Detergents from nearby factories make a foamy bed for ships at a lock in the River Neckar at Stuttgart, Germany. Factories deposit the detergents in already dirty water, making the river unfit for swimming. Fish cannot live in the water either.

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Eye Magnet / Mailbox / Water Walking (Nov, 1928)

How is that mailbox an improvement?

REMOVES METAL PARTICLES FROM EYES WITH RING MAGNET DESIGNED IN ENGLAND
ONE of the latest developments in the field of medical science is the ring magnet. It is proving of great value in removing pieces of metal from the eye after an accident. Workers in various industries often suffer from flying pieces of metal striking the eye. To remove such small particles is often a delicate operation whose pain is greatly lessened through the use of this ingenious device.

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Youth Invents Gondola Shoes to Walk English Channel (Sep, 1931)

If he ever attempted this I’m pretty sure you can visit both Mr. Terry and his gondola shoes a few meters down just off the coast of Dover.

Youth Invents Gondola Shoes to Walk English Channel

THE ancient Biblical feat of walking on water is soon to be duplicated by a Washington youth, George Terry, who has invented an odd pair of gondola shoes to achieve the stunt. The scene of the re-enactment of the feat will be the English Channel, between Dover and Calais.

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THE WONDERFUL RAT (Jan, 1959)

Well, that certainly looks… er. Rugged? Actually it seems like something you’d see at DisneyLand.

THE WONDERFUL RAT
THE Rat is an amazingly versatile Canadian vehicle developed and built by Canadair Ltd., Montreal. Only 1,500 lbs. in weight, the aluminum buggy can tote 600 lbs. of cargo while towing another 1,000 lbs. on sleds or toboggans. The unique tandem vehicle has a small gas engine in the front section with a takeoff to power the cargo section. It runs in water, over snow and has climbed a 50 per cent grade. It is for use with troops in northern Canada.

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Whispering Magic — The Navy’s Wireless (Oct, 1921)

Whispering Magic — The Navy’s Wireless

By DONALD WILHELM

ABOUT the least conspicuous yet most important thing on any ship, especially a Navy ship, is what those on board often call the wireless shack. It’s a small room aft of the bridge, usually, and the most interesting spot on board the vessel.

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Life-Saving Bomb (Jul, 1950)

Life-Saving Bomb

Here’s the Navy’s newest electronic weapon—it won’t, kill a soul but its underwater sound waves will aid thousands.

By Frank Tinsley

AN electronic bomb which disperses sound instead of shrapnel may save the lives of many survivors of sea disasters.

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On dining well (May, 1934)

I’m not sure I’ve ever seen a writer use “…!”. I think that should be called the ellipsobang. It might need it’s own symbol though, like the interrobang (‽);

On dining well

O noble gastronomic music, descend… and inspire this discourse…!

The joys of eating beautifully prepared food are perhaps more immediate, complex and compelling than those derived from any daily experience. For what other art calls at once upon the four senses of taste, touch, sight and smell? Such a complicated variety of stimuli is reserved for devotees of the culinary cult.

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