Archive
Nautical
Inflated Trunks for Safe Swimming (Dec, 1930)

Inflated Trunks for Safe Swimming

AN inventor from Vienna has figured out a way whereby non-swimmers who like to go swimming in deep water may do so with perfect safety. He has perfected a water wing device, shown in the photo at the left, which amounts to a pair of inflated, airtight shorts or trunks. They are blown up by the small air pump when the swimmer is about to take to the water.

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Inventor Gets Thrill in Homemade Submarine (Jun, 1933)

Inventor Gets Thrill in Homemade Submarine

His own invention, a one-man submarine, provides thrills for twenty-four-year-old James Bolar, Jr., of Oakland, Calif. He built the ten-foot craft in the basement of his home at a total cost of fifteen dollars for materials, and demonstrated it recently to astonished spectators in San Francisco Bay. Bolar enters a hinged conning tower, which is then sealed watertight by a rubber flap, and lies flat on the floor. A speedboat takes him in tow.

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SPIRAL ROLLERS DRIVE ODD SPEED BOAT (May, 1936)

SPIRAL ROLLERS DRIVE ODD SPEED BOAT
CLEAVING the water at express-train speed, a propellerless power boat of new design may shatter existing speed marks if it fulfills the hopes of its West Easton, Pa., inventor. Its slim hull rides upon three buoyant, barrel-shaped rollers, of which the forward two are connected to the power plant and revolve at high speed.

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LEARN Commercial DEEP SEA DIVING (Aug, 1950)

LEARN Commercial DEEP SEA DIVING

High paying and fascinating profession. 20 week course. World famous school. Latest equipment. Specialized training in all underwater work. Approved for Veterans. Write for FREE Booklet.

SPARLING DIVING SCHOOL
Dept. PM-8
1148 WILMINGTON BLVD.,
WILMINGTON, CALIF.

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Amphicar Travels on Water or Land (Aug, 1960)

Amphicar Travels on Water or Land

PART boat and part car, this German import recently made its American debut. Dubbed the Amphicar, it has a self-supporting floating body—162 in. long overall, on an 80-in. wheelbase.

Its 4-cylinder 39-hp motor is water cooled and has four fully synchronized forward speeds and one reverse for on-land operation. For on-water drive, a switch operates twin propellers in the rear at forward or reverse speed.

The manufacturer says it will give 32 mpg on land and use about 2 gals, per hour on the water. The importer is Amphicar Corporation of America, New York, N. Y.

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FRAME TEACHES SWIMMING (Feb, 1933)

FRAME TEACHES SWIMMING
Novices at swimming may acquire confidence with the aid of an odd mechanical device, just introduced in Germany. The swimmer lies on a floating frame supported at an adjustable height in the water by pontoons, and propels it forward by placing his feet in a pair of stirrups and kicking. Thus he learns the proper motions of the legs. Oar-like paddles may also be operated with the arms. The hinged propelling fins open automatically when pushed backward against the water.

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Youthful Skipper Hits Off 10 m.p.h. Clip on “Aquacar” (Nov, 1932)

That’s a cute boat but, do sandals really make your feet bigger?

Youthful Skipper Hits Off 10 m.p.h. Clip on “Aquacar”
A TWIN-PONTOON “aquacar” has solved all navigation problems for young Billy Barrud, of Lake Arrowhead, Calif. Eight paddles on each side wheel enable him to back up or speed ahead, merely by turning the handles in the direction he desires to go. Each pontoon is six feet long, canvas covered. Other parts are built from scrap wood. The boat is no slow poke, for it can hit off a neat clip of 10 miles per hour. $4 was the total cost of the contraption.

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Why Women’s Shoes Are Bigger
WOMEN’S shoes must be wider and differently shaped this winter because so many women wore sandals through the summer, is the prediction of a New York foot specialist. This summer’s styles have marked what is probably the closest to bare feet that shoes can come, allowing an unprecedented degree of freedom to the foot.|

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BABY TANK IS BUILT BY BOY TO NAVIGATE RIVER (May, 1924)

BABY TANK IS BUILT BY BOY TO NAVIGATE RIVER

Similar in appearance to the land tanks used during the war, a queer boat has been built by a boy in England. It is propelled by a paddle like a canoe and provides room for only one passenger. The novel craft attracted much attention when it appeared during a regatta on the River Thames.

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Piccard’s Submarine Balloon (Dec, 1947)

Piccard’s Submarine Balloon

A famous explorer of the stratosphere designs a remarkable undersea craft for a journey to ocean depths never before reached by man.

By Charles Wright, Aneta News Agency Correspondent

BRUSSELS, Belgium-(Special to Popular Science Monthly). By applying the lifting principle of a balloon to a diving chamber, Prof. Auguste Piccard, pioneer explorer of the stratosphere, has found a way to descend to greater depths of the ocean than man has ever reached before. He has embodied his idea in a submarine craft of extraordinary design, able to navigate more than two miles beneath the waves. As this is written, he and his Belgian assistant, Prof. Max Cosyns, of Brussels University, are preparing to entrust their lives to the invention in the Gulf of Guinea, off the Ivory Coast of Africa.

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Veteran Dares Atlantic In Barrel Boat (Oct, 1936)

I wonder if he ever built that thing.

Veteran Dares Atlantic In Barrel Boat

A SEA-GOING barrel—it sounds fantastic, but not to Ernest Biegazski, Buffalo, N. Y., war veteran, who plans to use just such a vessel to cross the Atlantic. The daring trip, according to his calculations, will not take more than 40 days. The oak barrel, which will comprise the hull of the vessel, will be nine feet long with a diameter of six feet, eight inches. A 600-pound keel will furnish the ballast. A hollow mast, 20 feet high, will carry the sail, a simple rig of approximately 300 square feet. A glass-enclosed hatch which will provide exit to the narrow deck. During stormy weather he will reef his sail, seal the hatch, and bob about safe as a cork.

Though the crossing is expected to take 40 days, Biegazski is taking food for sixty.

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