Archive
Transportation
Navies of the Stratosphere Threaten Cities (Nov, 1934)

Navies of the Stratosphere Threaten Cities

WARFARE, in the past hundred years or so, has been a contest between makers of guns and other offensive weapons, and makers of means of defense. As cannon were built bigger and bigger, ships were built heavier, and with more armor. It seems to be now agreed that the big ships are too expensive ; and it is quite possible that no more superdreadnoughts will ever be built.

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Oxygen-Supply Kit For High Fliers (Apr, 1960)

Oxygen-Supply Kit For High Fliers

Quickly installed in most unpressurized airplanes, a new kit will automatically provide correct amounts of oxygen needed for breathing at altitudes up to 30,000 feet. It consists of an oxygen regulator, oxygen console, fittings, brackets and an oxygen cylinder, which is usually placed in the baggage compartment.

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Perfect $7500 Race Car Model Made of Gold and Silver (May, 1932)

Perfect $7500 Race Car Model Made of Gold and Silver

PRONOUNCED by Harry A. Miller, world-renowned designer of racing automobiles, as the most perfect model in the world, the eighth-scale reproduction of the newest type racing car, shown in the photo at the left, has every working part of a full-size automobile duplicated in miniature.

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First Airplane Wash-Rack Helps Preserve Condition of Ships’ Wings (Jul, 1929)

First Airplane Wash-Rack Helps Preserve Condition of Ships’ Wings

CAR wash racks have been in existence almost as long as cars have themselves, but until recently there has not been a single wash-rack for airplanes. The Aero Corporation of California observed this fact and inaugurated an airplane washing service that thoroughly cleans a ship of grease and oil “while you wait.”

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PIN-UP CAR: 1910 MAXWELL-BRISCOE RUNABOUT (Jul, 1952)

PIN-UP CAR: 1910 MAXWELL-BRISCOE RUNABOUT

Owner: Leslie R. Henry of Havertown, Penna. Original price without top, windshield and headlamps: $550. Engine: two horizontal-opposed cylinders, 10 horsepower, 4×4-inch bore and stroke, two-speed planetary transmission hand operated. Top speed: 26 miles per hour. Color: red enamel with black japanned fenders. Car was discovered in northern Pennsylvania, had been caught in Johnstown flood of 1936, was taken apart bolt by bolt and completely restored by owner.

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A New Way of Keeping the Wolf from the Door (Oct, 1932)

A New Way of Keeping the Wolf from the Door

IN THE drought-stricken section of North Dakota, Ed M. Canfield, of Williston, and his wife, Dorotha, keep the wolf away from the door by dragging him in and making him pay the family’s winter expenses. Canfield is one of the West’s best coyote hunters. But, unlike other hunters, he uses an airplane to track down the coyote, or, to be more correct, his wife flies the plane while Dad Canfield handles the shotgun.

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“Covered Bicycle” Guards from Wind and Rain (Mar, 1941)

“Covered Bicycle” Guards from Wind and Rain

Many ingenious adaptations of the bicycle have been evolved by Europeans since shortage of gasoline, due to the war, has limited the use of automobiles. One Frenchman in occupied Paris, faced with the necessity of using his bike through the winter, constructed a shelter that covers him from head to foot.

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Liquid Rocket (Feb, 1946)

Liquid Rocket, Germany’s ME 163B fighter, was only a rumor when MI commissioned their staff artists to do drawing below that appeared in May, 1945, issue. Photo of real plane was recently released.

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MI Tests the ’54 Cadillac (Aug, 1954)

MI Tests the ’54 Cadillac

Uncle Tom takes a gander at America’s favorite prestige automobile and discovers that for real economy, believe it or not, Cadillac is tops.

By Tom McCahill

“Gee Dad, look at the new Wurlitzer console organ, de luxe style!”

“No, Son, that’s one of them sightseeing trains.”

Obviously they are both wrong: the object they are looking at is a new Cadillac. For though the 1954 Caddie was not designed to look like a B-36 in flight, that long tail makes it possible to back over a guy for twenty minutes before the wheels touch him.

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Tiny ‘Goliath’, Three-Wheel Vest Pocket Car, Makes Hit (Jul, 1931)

Tiny ‘Goliath’, Three-Wheel Vest Pocket Car, Makes Hit

DAY by day, in every way, small motor cars seem to be getting smaller and smaller. The latest in the way of diminutive autos comes from Germany, and is a vest-pocket machine so small that the German government exempts it from a motor vehicle tax.

Selling for $355, the new auto is a three-wheeled affair, and is large enough to carry two large or three small passengers without uncomfortable crowding. Passengers alight directly on the curb, unassisted by the customary running board.

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