Archive
Transportation
Electro Magnets Clear Tacks Off Universal City Streets (Mar, 1930)

Or you could just sweep the streets…

Electro Magnets Clear Tacks Off Universal City Streets

ELECTRO magnets on a bar mounted on wheels and trailed after a car make the streets of Universal City, California, safe for motorists. The magnets pick up nails, tacks, pieces of wire, lost bolts and nuts and a wide variety of other metal objects which if left in the streets would cause punctures and other tire trouble. Frank Graves, electrical chief of the city, invented the puncture fighter.

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playing for keeps? (Jul, 1954)

playing for keeps?

Are you willing to stake the future on your belief in you… to match your ability against the toughest engineering challenge? Are you planning to go far in this business —and playing for keeps? If so, there may be a place for you here.

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British Build Largest Land Plane (Apr, 1931)

British Build Largest Land Plane

THE Handley-Page Company of England, which is building a fleet of gigantic ail-liners for the Imperial Airways, recently completed the first of these mammoth ships, which made a successful trial flight.

Seven other of these planes are now under construction.

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Old-Time Railroad is His Backyard Hobby (Apr, 1948)

Old-Time Railroad is His Backyard Hobby

By John Edwin Hogg

ON Ardendale Road, north of San Gabriel, California, passing motorists are treated to a sight which makes them stare, blink their eyes, and then stare again.

Puffing through the orange groves they see a ghost of the past. It is the locomotive, “Sidney Dillon,” gaudily painted and guilded relic of one of the most romantic eras in railroading’s history.

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Speed in Transportation (Jan, 1934)

The fastest conventional trains in service today manage around 200 MPH. The fastest speed ever achieved by a railed vehicle was set in 2003 by a four-stage rocket sled tested at Holloman Air Force Base which clocked in at 6,481 mph.

Speed in Transportation

By HUGO GERNSBACK

DURING the next few years, we are to witness a series of strenuous competitions between our railroads and the airplanes. Only too late have the railroads awakened to the fact that airplanes are cutting in seriously into their business. Because of the superior speed of the airplane, the railroads which, during the last decade, lost much business to the automobile, are now beset by a new worry.

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ARSON UNDER THE SEAS (Jan, 1942)

ARSON UNDER THE SEAS

U-boat warfare, a menace now, will become even more brutal with this flame-throwing sub!

by Captain James Poole

A NEW refinement—if that’s the word-on that deadly menace, the submarine, in which the U-boat is enabled to come to the surface and destroy whole fleets of enemy craft with a sheet of all-enveloping flame, has been perfected and tested in California by John Edwin Hogg, a frequent contributor to Mechanix Illustrated on military and naval subjects.

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THEY’RE HERE! NEW ’62 FORD TRUCKS (Oct, 1961)

THEY’RE HERE! NEW ’62 FORD TRUCKS

Get full-time economy that only starts with Ford’s low price!

Meet the trucks that make saving money a full-time business—the new ’62 Fords!

In a selection of over 600 models there’s a truck that’s right for your job, whatever your job. . . trucks that you can buy and operate at lower cost. . . trucks that can save you money mile after mile, load after load, year after year!

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NEW in SCIENCE (Oct, 1949)

NEW in SCIENCE

Glass Boat is a Fiberglas-reinforced plastic assault craft which the Army is putting through rigid tests at Fort Belvoir. It weighs less than 300 pounds and carries 15 men. A World War II plywood craft of the same type weighed over 400 pounds and carried only 12 men. The propulsion unit of this new attack weapon is a neat 33-hp outboard engine.

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TOM McCAHILL SAYS: “We Can Stop the Highway Slaughter!” (Nov, 1954)

TOM McCAHILL SAYS: “We Can Stop the Highway Slaughter!”

MI’s famed automotive authority proposes a gutsy, double-barreled safety program which would make a lot of people mad—but also save a lot of lives.

SPEED, illegal speed, is the Number One cause of highway deaths, according to the majority of the high-tinkling brass in the safety business. To this I say, “Phooey.” Speed is a cause of highway deaths—but then, so is slow-driving. As I see it, there are four primary causes of our annual roadway slaughter: obsolete highways, Stone Age police practices, bad drivers and unsafe automobiles.

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New Car Steers at Both Front and Rear (Apr, 1936)

New Car Steers at Both Front and Rear
THE new European car illustrated above, and shown in diagram at the left, is quite trim in its lines, and incorporates an interesting departure. The motor is at the rear, behind the wheels it drives; while the steering wheels are at the two ends of the machine, giving considerable leverage for rapid maneuvering. The weight is concentrated, as will be seen by the driving wheels.

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