Archive
Transportation
Approve New “Fool-Proof” Planes (Nov, 1936)

Approve New “Fool-Proof” Planes

TWO years ago, the Bureau of Air Commerce started a development program that had as its goal the production of a “foolproof” airplane at a cost of about $700. It was hoped that a low-cost, safe airplane would promote sport flying on a larger scale throughout the United States.

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Push-button Parking (Oct, 1946)

Push-button Parking

PRESS a button and park your car! The Park-O-Mat automatically places an auto in any desired stall of a garage. With it, more cars can be parked in less space in less time by fewer attendants.

At the garage entrance arms grip the front and rear bumpers and slide the car to an elevator.

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Sailbike – PROPELLED BY WIND, ODD BEACH VEHICLE GIVES THRILL RIDE (Oct, 1939)

Sailbike – PROPELLED BY WIND, ODD BEACH VEHICLE GIVES THRILL RIDE

WHEELING over hard-packed sand at high speeds, an odd vehicle designed and constructed by a European inventor combines features of a bicycle, a scooter, and a sailboat. Starting with the framework of a tandem bicycle, the inventor joined the front and back wheels with a tubular steel framework that supports a wooden, scooterlike platform into which was stepped a wooden mast.

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The World’s Greatest Truck Value! (Apr, 1923)

The World’s Greatest Truck Value!

RUGGLES

A Truck Produced and Serviced by Transportation Experts

The great Ruggles organization is made up of trained transportation experts. The factory specialists know how to build trucks to meet commercial needs. The local dealer applies transportation principles to the economical moving of your product.

Ruggles Trucks are built to perform definite service. They are strong, powerful, dependable. They have the power to carry your load and the speed to maintain your schedules.

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AN INVENTOR’S DAUGHTER WHO RISKED HER LIFE TO TEST HER FATHER’S DEVICE (Sep, 1915)

Not that this wasn’t a compelling demonstration, but I think that the aviators might have been more reassured if his son, Tubs Brodwick had tested it instead.

AN INVENTOR’S DAUGHTER WHO RISKED HER LIFE TO TEST HER FATHER’S DEVICE

MISS TINY BRODWICK, an eighteen-year-old girl in San Diego, California, recently showed her faith in the safety parachute for aviators invented by her father, Charles Brodwick, by dropping to earth from a flying parachute. The feat occurred before a crowd of visitors at the San Diego Exposition, and the parachute worked in perfect fashion.

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Plastic Auto Top Is Removable (Apr, 1946)

What good is the rear spotlight going to do if you can’t see out the back and the side mirrors are the size of lollipops?

Plastic Auto Top Is Removable

Tradition is disregarded in a custom-built automobile body designed by Raymond Loewy and equipped with a transparent plastic top for the driver’s seat which can be removed for warm weather motoring. Built on a standard 1942 Lincoln Zephyr chassis, the body is six inches lower than conventional cars. Blue glass portholes are fitted into the rear dome, and a plastic shield—hinged to the top—can be lowered between front and rear seats. A rear spotlight aids in backing up.

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What Transportation Means to Civilization (Apr, 1923)

What Transportation Means to Civilization

$525 f.o.b. Flint, Mich.

Civilization is the result of interchange of individual thought and the product of thought.

This interchange depends entirely on transportation.

For transportation of products or people in the mass, major transportation units such as ships and railroad trains are most economical, yet limited to fixed ocean lanes or tracks on the land.

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My 10,000 Flights in Untried Planes (Oct, 1931)

My 10,000 Flights in Untried Planes

By Frank T. Courtney

CAPTAIN FRANK T. COURTNEY began flying in England in 1911. During the war, he served as a member of the Royal Flying Corps. In 1919, an accident destroyed his chance of making the first nonstop flight across the Atlantic. In 1928, he attempted to fly the Atlantic from east to west. The engine caught fire in mid-ocean and he drifted for twenty-four hours. He is a famous racing pilot and has tested more new planes than any other flyer.

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Count the engines on this corporate-size jetliner. (Oct, 1961)

Count the engines on this corporate-size jetliner.

This is the Lockheed JetStar: Four pure-jet Pratt & Whitney powerplants deliver peace of mind as well as power. And the engines speak softly because they are mounted on the aft fuselage—where their noise is behind you. You cruise at 500-550 mph, up to 45,000 feet high—far above the weather.

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MI Tests the Willys Jeepster and Station Wagon (Jan, 1950)

MI Tests the Willys Jeepster and Station Wagon

“This wagon could almost climb the side of a building!” says Tom McCahill after testing the Jeep’s newest descendant.

HEWING to the line that nothing succeeds like success, Little Willie Jeep, the bottom-busting toughie of war fame, has spread himself out four ways, all heading in the same general direction.

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