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Motorcycles Crash Without Danger (Mar, 1934)

I just love this picture. She looks like she’s about to run someone down.

Motorcycles Crash Without Danger

MOTORCYCLES designed for use by novices in amusement parks or at fairs or carnivals are mounted in rubber cushioned frames that absorb the shock when riders crash into each other.
The rubber-protected frame is mounted on casters and fastened rigidly to the motorcycle to prevent tipping.
Riders get all the thrills of motorcycling here with absolute safety both for themselves and the expensive machines.

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Hand Light Aids Night Driving (Oct, 1934)

The stylish alternative to blinkers.

Hand Light Aids Night Driving

The confusion over driving signals when motoring at night is largely eliminated with a new device which straps to the back of the hand.

A rubber half glove is fitted with a red reflector of Bohemian glass which makes hand signals easily visible at all ordinary distances.

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Neon Signs Identify Police Patrol Cars (Apr, 1939)

Neon Signs Identify Police Patrol Cars

Police cars assigned to the park districts of Chicago, Ill., are now fitted with roof-top neon signs so that motorists may identify them on the road at any time during the day or night. Within park areas, the police automobiles travel at legal speeds so that drivers may spot them and judge their own speed accordingly. Even in heavy fog, the rooftop signs are easily visible, as shown in the photograph reproduced
at the left.

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Daring Rocketmen to Invade the Stratosphere (May, 1934)

This reminds me of the ill-fated Rotary Rocket company.

Daring Rocketmen to Invade the Stratosphere

The rocket-shooters are going to pitch in again this coming summer. Undaunted by reverses and tragedies during the past year’s experiments, the rocketeers are tackling their work with renewed vigor and ambition, plus improved apparatus and chemicals.

Ernst Loebell, famous German engineer and rocket designer, promises to bring the rocket engines to their greatest point of achievement next summer. He is now in this country and is an active worker in the Cleveland Rocket Society.

Loebell has been carrying on bis preliminary experiments on the big Hanna estate in a suburb of Cleveland. In their operations the Cleveland group has been making use of the lessons taught by the experiments of Loebell’s countryman, the late Reinhold Tilling, a noted radio engineer and rocket builder.

Prior to his death. Tilling had been experimenting with rockets and rocket planes for months. The success of a rocket which reached a height of (6,000 feet in 1931 spurred him on to the construction of a rocket with glider wings which unfolded when the fuel was exhausted and brought the projectile gently to earth. This feat was hailed as one of the first practical steps toward the development of mail and passenger carrying rockets.

The Tilling rockets were set in motion by telignition from a distance of 100 yards. They attained a speed of 700 miles an hour and landed five miles from the starting point, in accordance with calculations. Herr Tilling was working on a system designed to manipulate his rockets by radio control when he and a female assistant were killed in the explosion of a rocket which they were charging.

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Build your own JET ENGINE! (Jan, 1952)

Build your own JET ENGINE!

Order these plans today
1. Jet Propelled Bicycle, Assemble your own. Photo and instructions, $1.00
2. How to make experimental jet engines. Seven sheets drawings with information and instructions $2.95
3. Both of above in one order $3.75.
SEND NO MONEY. Order both at once $3.75 C.O.D in USA plus c.o.d postage.
Send check or Money Order and we pay postage. Get other information too. Rush Order.

J. Houston Maupin, Dept. 55, Tipp City, Ohio

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New Bicycle Gearshift & Man with telephoto eyes (May, 1934)

Bicycle Gearshift Makes Hill Climbing Easy for Cyclists

CYCLISTS no longer have to jump off and push their wheels up the steeper hills, now that a bicycle gearshift is available.

The high gear is used for normal riding; the rider has but to shift to low gear, and ride up the steepest of grades in comfort. The coaster brake functions as usual with both gears.

In one type the gear selection is controlled by a lever on the frame; in the other the shifting is done by a foot-controlled lever on the pedal crank.


One-wheel Trailer Folds Up on Car

THE latest in trailers, a one-wheel affair that folds up against the spare tire when not in use, is finding great popularity among English motorists.

A single caster wheel automatically reverses or turns with the car. The luggage rack trailer is hinged to rear bumper at two points.

Eyes Magnify Objects 100 Times

ALVA MASON of Minot, Maine, has eyes which magnify everything within his range of vision one hundred times, making pores appear as deep holes in the skin. He wears demagnifying glasses when at work, since his range of acute vision is limited.

Luncheon Trays for Motorists

A TRAY which tits inside any closed car permits motorists patronizing curb service stands to enjoy food and drink as if they were sitting at a table. The tray can be instantly leveled by turning a thumb screw. No crumbs need get on the upholstery.

New Crystal Radio Is Powerful

THE latest in crystal sets, housed in a beautiful black Bakelite case, has even an illuminated tuning dial. It is claimed that the quality and volume of reception far exceeds that of any ether crystal receiver. No batteries are needed—only aerial, ground, and headphones.

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“Yield” Sign Reduces Accidents (Jan, 1952)

After years of research and development, scientists believe they have finally created a new type of street sign. Yes, it is truly a miracle of modern signage; a shining example of American know how and inventiveness.


“Yield” Sign Reduces Accidents

Warning motorists to give the right of way to cars on the intersecting road, a new “Yield” sign is already reducing accidents in Tulsa, Ok la., where it was developed. Designed for use in areas where traffic generally is not heavy enough to warrant full-stop requirements, the sign definitely places responsibility without requiring a complete stop. Motorists approaching the sign must slow down to at least 10 miles an hour and yield the right of way to any car approaching along the intersecting roadway. Any driver becoming involved in a collision at an intersection after passing a yield sign is automatically deemed to have violated the law.

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How I Got My Wife to Use a Seat Belt (Jun, 1960)

The title of this article should be: “How Mr. Pavlov got his wife to buckle up: a lesson for the auto-industry.”

How I Got My Wife to Use a Seat Belt

FOR 10 years I have used safety belts in my car. But each time we went for a ride I have had to tell my wife to fasten her belt. She is a most stubborn person and uses all kinds of excuses for not doing so.

I have finally won. These drawings show how. The system tells her to put the belt on. It works like magic every time. It saves arguments. The little reminder consists of a light, the words “Safety Belt,” a buzzer, and two cunningly wired snap switches.

When my wife gets into the front seat beside me, her weight trips a normally open snap switch under the seat. Two things happen: First a doorbell buzzer begins sounding behind the dash, attracting my wife’s attention toward it. Second, in the opening where a clock usually is mounted, the words “Safety Belt” are illuminated by a lamp behind the dash.

The second snap switch, normally closed, is mounted under one strap of the belt so that it is opened by the pressure of pulling the belt across the waist. This breaks the circuit, stopping the buzzer and turning off the lamp. As long as my wife sits in the seat, she’d better have the belt on correctly or the buzzer will let her know. [Editor's note: An optional cut-out switch is shown in the drawing for those who might like one.]

Now, when we start out, she races me to fasten the belt before I can use the ignition key and turn on the circuit. Seems she doesn’t like to hear the buzz. The only way to stop the buzz is to get out of the seat or turn off the ignition— or put on the belt. If she wants to go for a ride that leaves her little choice.

— Wes Jayne, Woodhaven, N.Y.

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Is Aerial Warfare Doomed? (Nov, 1934)

Needless to say, many of the predictions in this article didn’t pan out.

Is Aerial Warfare Doomed?

Original Editor’s Note – Statements by aviation enthusiasts that airplanes will wipe out cities, destroy fleets and armies, and win the next war prompted this article by Lieut. Hogg, noted writer on military topics. In it he makes startling revelations about the effectiveness of the airplane as a military weapon. The observations and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and should not be construed as reflecting the official views or opinions of the United States Navy Department.

Startling Statements About Aerial Warfare

During the World War airplanes sank no battleships, destroyed no city, and failed in every attempt to bomb or gas an enemy out of a military position.

The first 30 days of any major war will see the complete elimination of air forces of belligerent powers.

No aviator entertains the thought that he is going to fly over the enemy anti-aircraft battery in time of war – and live to tell the tale.

Air raids over London and Paris during the four years of the World War destroyed less than $5,000,000 worth of property and killed fewer than 700 enemy civilians.

It would take 75,000 bombers to carry the load of bombs equivalent to the weight of shells carried by the 15 battleships of the U. S. Navy. The cruising radius of those bombers would be only 500 miles. A battleship can travel 15,000 miles, regardless of weather.

A shell will drill through heavy armor plate, or through concrete walls. It explodes inside to produce a shattering, internal explosion. A aerial bomb, having no such power of penetration pops off like a paper firecracker against whatever it hits.

It would take 28,000,000 pounds of phosgene to “wipe out” an area the size of New York City. To accomplish this the enemy would have to have 14,000 large bombing planes and 280 naval airplane carriers to bring the planes within striking distance of New York.

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Bat Car (Aug, 1950)

This is the coolest freaking car. It’s like a combination of the Batmobile and a land speeder from Star Wars.

Ground-Hugging Motor Car Being Made in Sweden

Cruising the streets of Stockholm is a new Swedish car, built so low it seems to glide along the ground. The little car seats two and is designed to sell for about $386. When the plant is in full operation, about 50 of the cars will be turned out each week.

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