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MI PIN-UP CAR: 1900 WHITE STANHOPE STEAMER (Nov, 1956)

MI PIN-UP CAR: 1900 WHITE STANHOPE STEAMER

Owner: Jerry Foley, Jacksonville, Fla. Engine: 2-cylinder double-acting steam engine, 6 brake horsepower. Wheelbase: 66 in. Weight: 1,100 lbs. Top speed: approximately 60 mph. Said to be oldest White Steamer in the U. S. Original cost was $1,000.

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NEW SAFETY HARNESS (Nov, 1955)

NEW SAFETY HARNESS

At least four famous racing drivers owe their lives to this simple 2-1/2-pound safety gadget.

FOUR Lincoln crew members of the recent Pan American-Mexican Road Race attribute their lives to the new Pacific Harness Safety Reel which bolts to the car’s floor. Attached to a shoulder harness, the reel allows cable to feed in or out, giving the driver freedom of movement up to 18 inches. But in an emergency, the reel locks instantly and automatically, snubbing the driver within just one-half inch of travel—perhaps saving his life.

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AIR-SEA FIGHTERS (Sep, 1947)

 

For a couple of years after this article was written, the Navy was still ordering subsonic fighter planes to launch off of carriers.  This is because the then state of the art jet engine technology required takeoff rolls too long for an aircraft carrier. This is what led the Navy to consider a supersonic seaplane like the Convair Sea Dart.

AIR-SEA FIGHTERS

BY C.B. COLBY

IT KILLS us to admit it but the British have sneaked in with two more aviation firsts—a jet powered flying boat and a seaplane fighter with retractable hull.

From the Saunders-Roe back room comes the single seater SR/A1 jet fighter, one of the most interesting as well as prophetic aircraft of recent times. (See drawing at right.) This amazing little “pint-size clipper” with a nasty sting is the first boat-hulled aircraft to be powered with jet engines.

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THE NEW MG (Jan, 1954)

THE NEW MG
MG for ’54 has been restyled and hopped up. Restyling in the new model, which is called the MG TF, is especially evident forward of the windshield, where the hood has been sloped down to a V-shaped radiator and the headlights have been faired into the front fenders. A higher compression ratio, twin carburetors, and other modifications have increased power output from the 54 hp at 5,200 rpm that was developed in the MG TD to 57.5 hp at 5,500 rpm. With disk wheels, the TF sells in this country for about $2,200; wire wheels are optional.

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Ford’s out Front WITH EVERYBODY! (Oct, 1946)

Ford’s out Front WITH EVERYBODY!

“King-sized brakes”
“The liveliest performer in the low-priced field ”
“Extra large trunk… that’s no joke, son!”

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Pedestrians Lose Last Refuge (Aug, 1930)

Yup. Nailed it. (video link)

Pedestrians Lose Last Refuge

Our artist’s idea of what may happen if they start playing golf by auto.

CURTIS W. WILLOCK. of Pasadena, is inordinately fond of golf. He may never be a champion but he certainly has contributed in a large measure, to the modernization of the ancient and honorable sport. Ordered by his physician to avoid fatigue caused by the long walk around the links. Mr. Willock had a special electric car built which permits him to enjoy the game.

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New Style “Traveling Grandstand” Seats for Crew Races (Aug, 1930)

New Style “Traveling Grandstand” Seats for Crew Races

DUE to the unusually large crowd which reserved “grandstand seats” for the Harvard-Yale crew races this summer, the New Haven railroad was compelled to exert its ingenuity to devise a “traveling grandstand” which would provide 800 extra seats. Four tiers of benches with backs were built into circus seat sections on the ground. These sections were mounted onto 36 steel gondola cars which were provided with awnings supported by frames of steel tubing.

Starting with the two-mile freshman contest, the sightseeing train follows the various races from start to finish; the varsity race over a four-mile course being the climax of the day.

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DON’T BE AFRAID TO FLY! (Aug, 1945)

Saying 400 mph is “approaching the speed of sound” is sort of like saying that walking down the street is “approaching the maximum speed of a Formula One race car.”

DON’T BE AFRAID TO FLY!

As a civilian pilot you will experience none of the hazards which are apt to confront our military flyers.

PICK up today’s military aviation releases and read all about how blackout suits, electric underwear, pressure cabins, crash helmets and oxygen masks protect our pilots against the “effects of flying.” No wonder many of us are afraid to go up in a plane! We have been given the impression that in order to fly, a fellow has to be a kind of Captain Marvel with a stainless-steel constitution.

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1913 SMITH BUCKBOARD (May, 1956)

1913 SMITH BUCKBOARD

THIS beautifully restored A.O. Smith Buckboard, vintage 1913, was put into its excellent condition by its present owner and discoverer, John Baum of Ephrata, Pa. John found the car in a barn and traced the original owner of the vehicle when he acquired it. The car was patented in 1912 and Baum’s model is number J 46, delivered in July 1913.

Baum believes the car is the oldest and possibly the only restored and running five-wheel auto in the world. It cost its first owner $338. The vehicle weighs only 456 pounds and it is powered by a 5-horsepower, 1-cylinder engine that has a top speed of 20 miles per hour.

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FIBERGLAS SPORTS CAR (May, 1956)

That is one hell of a present for your kid, though with that giant hood it looks like the turning radius is probably similar to a real sports car.

FIBERGLAS SPORTS CAR

No youngster could ask for more than have his dad build him this rakish looking sports car.

By John Micklitsch

TO keep the cost at a minimum, about 75% of the mechanical parts used on the car were either bought at junk yards or second-hand dealers. Except for the welding of the chassis, which was a professional job, the body, transmission, steering, etc., was home-built and assembled by the designer, strictly an amateur.

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