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Transportation
NEW THRILLS FROM WINGED BICYCLE (Dec, 1930)

NEW THRILLS FROM WINGED BICYCLE

Part, at least, of the thrill of gliding can be had by bicycle riders whose machines are equipped with wings and tailpiece. This glider outfit is the invention of Harry T. Nelson, Dallas, Texas, World War flyer. It consists of small wings and a tailpiece that, he says, can be readily attached to any bicycle.

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Bensen BUILD-IT YOURSELF ONE-MAN COPTER (Feb, 1965)

Bensen BUILD-IT YOURSELF ONE-MAN COPTER

AIR FORCE CAPTAIN SAYS: “The simple construction and autorotation feature undoubtedly make this aircraft one of the safest in the air today.” Detailed plans and kits available. 3-View Drawings, specs, photo $2, or Copter-Glider $1. Order now!

Send $1 or $2

BENSEN AIRCRAFT CORP., Dept. PS-25
Raleigh-Durham Airport, Raleigh, N. C.

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Thrills of the Flying Sailors (Jul, 1940)

Thrills of the Flying Sailors

A VETERAN NAVY PILOT DESCRIBES LIFE ON OUR AIRCRAFT CARRIERS

By Lieut. Comdr. DON F. SMITH

THE author, at present in command of the Floyd Bennett Field Naval Reserve Base in New York City, has had more than 5,000 hours of flying in every type of Naval aviation squadron. Of his twenty-three years in the Navy, nine have been spent piloting swift pursuit ships and powerful dive-bombers from the decks of Uncle Sam’s giant floating airports, the aircraft carriers.

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Skim Over The Ice With… A SKATER’S SAIL (Feb, 1959)

Skim Over The Ice With… A SKATER’S SAIL

SKATE sailing might be described as the fastest pedestrian sport in the world except for jaywalking on the Hollywood Freeway. And until something comes along to top its 50 to 60-mile-per-hour maximum speeds, that claim will stand.

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MILLIONS SPENT ON RAILROAD STATIONS (Feb, 1909)

MILLIONS SPENT ON RAILROAD STATIONS

By SAMUEL O. DUNN

Western Editorial Manager. Railroad Age Gazette

THE typical American railroad passenger station of the past has been a building so dingy, so ugly and so ill-arranged that travelers wished to see as little of it as practicable and to get through it as quickly as possible.

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What’s New in AVIATION (Feb, 1947)

What’s New in AVIATION

P-51 GETS A BOOST. When the Army recently experimented on a Mustang fighter (above), it installed two ram-let engines on its wing tips. The jets don’t start working until the P-51 hits 350 m.p.h.

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Lifeboat Has Invisible Crew (May, 1952)

Lifeboat Has Invisible Crew

FAR OUT AT SEA an Air Force plane crashes. Search planes head over the area, and the survivors are spotted in the water. Then an amazing series of electronic miracles begins.

From the rescue plane drops a lifeboat shaped like a fat cigar. A stabilizing fin on the stern keeps it level until a parachute opens.

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LARGEST SAILING SHIP IN THE WORLD (Feb, 1909)

LARGEST SAILING SHIP IN THE WORLD

By VICTOR GUILLON

THE German ship R. C. Rickmers which recently discharged a cargo of 40,000 barrels of cement at San Pedro, California, is the largest sailing vessel in the world. Some of her principal dimensions are: Length of deck, 441 feet; beam, 53 feet; draft, loaded, 27 feet; displacement, to load water line, 11,360 tons; sail area, 50,000 square feet.

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How the Navy Trains Dirigible Pilots (Mar, 1932)

How the Navy Trains Dirigible Pilots

by John L. Coontz

Uncle Sam is the only nation to systematically train pilots for giant military dirigibles like Los Angeles and Akron.

“WHAT on earth are those men doing?” exclaimed a visitor to the Lakehurst, N. J. naval air station, as he watched several groups of men manipulating as many balloons in an open field.

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Accounting Offices Drive Right Up to Your Door (Jul, 1940)

Accounting Offices Drive Right Up to Your Door

Bookkeeping on wheels is the odd and profitable business that makes a good living for C. M. Harris, of Los Angeles, Calif. Harris owns a fleet of light trucks, each manned by an expert accountant and outfitted as a rolling office with a typewriter, calculator, bookkeeping machine, and other necessary office equipment.

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