Archive
Transportation
‘Dust Bowl’ Truck Has Air-Conditioned Cab (Dec, 1936)

‘Dust Bowl’ Truck Has Air-Conditioned Cab

Not only the drivers but the Diesel engine itself breathes conditioned air in a truck built for travel through the “dust bowl” of Kansas and Colorado. Since comfort for the drivers during stifling dust storms was essential, a mechanical air conditioner was installed in the cab.

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SOS Detective… (Mar, 1947)

SOS Detective…

Translating distress signals into beams of light, this Navy-developed rescue aid speedily plots the position of ships or planes in trouble at sea. Tiny camera projectors interpret bearings received from direction-finding stations; the intersection of their beams on the map indicates the position of the craft in distress. The dial above the chart automatically gives the course to the position.

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“Sea Water” Metal Used to Make Plane (Feb, 1949)

“Sea Water” Metal Used to Make Plane

Sea and air combine in a five-seater British personal plane made of magnesium alloy, an element extracted from sea water. Though the metal weighs less than the lightest aluminum, the wings in bending tests have withstood deflection five times greater than is required. Expected to fly over 200 m.p.h., the unorthodox craft was designed by an “amateur” who had never before worked around airplanes.

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The Lowdown On 1942 Cars (Dec, 1941)

They sure liked the suffix -matic at the time. Liquamatic, Hydra-Matic, Turbo-matic, Electromatic, Simplimatic, and Vacamatic all appear in just this article.

The Lowdown On 1942 Cars

Exactly What Have War Conditions And Shortages Done To Your 1942 Car? Here’s Detroit’s Answer To The Challenge.

by Frederick C. Russell

CALL them the 1942 cars if you like, but the glittering dreams that are rolling off the Detroit assembly lines along with tanks, bomber engines and the exciting implements of this bewildering era are, in reality, the latest models of American ingenuity.

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Canned Airplane (Sep, 1947)

Canned Airplane

THE Navy has begun “canning” more than 2,000 surplus carrier and trainer aircraft, to preserve them in near fly-away condition for periods up to five years.

The “canning” process seals the complete planes, with wings folded, in metal containers constructed from 10-foot panels of corrugated steel.

In each “can” relative humidity is kept at 30 percent. Vapor-tight access doors afford entry for inspection, and glass windows allow easy reading of five instruments that indicate temperature and relative humidity.

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The SWIFT (Jun, 1946)

The SWIFT

BY GILBERT PAUST

Long cruising range, adaptability and fine performance make this one of the most popular new planes.

ONE thing can be said for the Swift right from the start—it’s a corking good airplane and offers the guy who wants to fly a lot more value than its price of $3,495.00 indicates. It’s all-metal, one of the first samples of production-line technique applied to the aircraft industry.

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Small Dirigible TOWS GLIDER (Jan, 1930)

Small Dirigible TOWS GLIDER

TWO unusual glider events took place recently at Akron, Ohio, municipal airport. One, believed to be the first of its kind ever attempted, was the successful towing of a glider by a small dirigible.

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Cargo Canoe (Dec, 1947)

Cargo Canoe can be detached from the bottom of the fuselage in less than two minutes and towed to the terminal by tractor. Used on Eastern Air Lines’ 60-passenger Constellations, it accommodates 8,000 pounds of baggage and greatly facilitates handling. This photo shows “skycaps” removing bags from the detachable compartment at Newark, N. J., airport after the “Connie’s” four-hour, non-stop flight from Miami, Florida.

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BULLET BOUNCER ON CAR SAVES POLICE FROM THUGS (Dec, 1932)

BULLET BOUNCER ON CAR SAVES POLICE FROM THUGS
Bullet bouncers are now in use on cars of the San Francisco, Calif., police department to protect members of radio patrol crews from the gunfire of thugs. The contrivances are sheets of quarter-inch-thick steel plate, equipped with shuttered windows and hinged to the top of the windshield frame.

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BOAT RUNS ON ROLLING DRUMS (Dec, 1932)

BOAT RUNS ON ROLLING DRUMS
A boat that runs along the surface of the water on drums was given a trial recently on the Hackensack River, near Newark, N. J. Five specially-designed white steel drums, having indentations like the treads on tires to increase their grip upon the water, support the craft.

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