Archive
Transportation
Puppet Show Teaches Traffic Laws (Jun, 1938)

Puppet Show Teaches Traffic Laws

THE ancient art of puppetry has been enlisted by the Bureau of Public Safety of Detroit, Mich., in a novel campaign to cut the accident toll of modern traffic. A play—”Stop, Look and Listen”— enacted by marionettes, is being shown at all of the city’s schools in an effort to impress children with safety rules. The cast of marionettes features a policeman, a teacher, children, stop lights, and traffic in the form of model automobiles, which are actuated by motor-driven belts.

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Whispering Magic — The Navy’s Wireless (Oct, 1921)

Whispering Magic — The Navy’s Wireless

By DONALD WILHELM

ABOUT the least conspicuous yet most important thing on any ship, especially a Navy ship, is what those on board often call the wireless shack. It’s a small room aft of the bridge, usually, and the most interesting spot on board the vessel.

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Six serious reasons for owning a fun-to-drive AMC Gremlin X. (Feb, 1978)

It’s interesting how much more reliable cars have gotten since this time. The fact that a company would advertise the fact they had a 12 year 12,000 mile warranty is kind of sad. And this is AMC, not company that was particularly famous for reliability. Current warranty terms from auto-makers implies abit more confidence in their products.

Six serious reasons for owning a fun-to-drive AMC Gremlin X.

1. Good performance and fuel economy is provided by the peppy 4-cylinder engine and 4-speed gear box. EPA estimated mileage ratings: 35 highway; 22 city; 27 combined.*

2. Sporty Levi’s® fabric bucket seats.

3. Extra width to give you plenty of road-hugging stability plus interior room and comfort.

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TRACTOR SO LARGE AUTO CAN PASS UNDER IT (Jan, 1924)

TRACTOR SO LARGE AUTO CAN PASS UNDER IT

So large that an automobile can pass underneath it, a tractor, weighing 10 tons, has been made for logging operations in California. It replaces several teams of horses and requires of only a few men Slung beneath the body and between its wheels, one pair of which is 10 feet in diameter, immense tree trunks can be handled with ease. It has a wheel base of 18 feet, so it can carry logs of great length.

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RAILROAD BICYCLE AIDS GUARD TO FIGHT FOREST FIRES (Mar, 1924)

RAILROAD BICYCLE AIDS GUARD TO FIGHT FOREST FIRES

To enable members of a forest patrol to cover their areas in the shortest possible time, light four-wheeled cars, that travel on the tracks of railroads, have been built.

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Streamlined Scooter HAS TURBINE DRIVE (Apr, 1946)

Streamlined Scooter HAS TURBINE DRIVE

DESIGNER’S DREAM CYCLE USES A 4-HP. ENGINE AND GETS 60 M.P.H.

IT SPORTS A POLISHED ALUMINUM BODY ON A LIGHT TUBULAR FRAME.

WITH an eye to the short-trip driver, quick-delivery services, and vacationists, Ray Russell, of Detroit, has designed and built an unconventional motor scooter.

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Plans Non-Stop World Flight (Mar, 1936)

How is it “non-stop” if he has five “refueling contacts”? I’m guessing they didn’t refuel in midair…

The first airborne circumnavigation without refueling didn’t happen until the Rutan Voyager in 1986.

Plans Non-Stop World Flight

A GIANT airplane that may make a nonstop trip around the world and large enough to carry 14 passengers has been built recently for Clyde Pangborn, noted aviator. The fuselage is so designed that its lifting ability is developed to the utmost, being actually part of the wing. Power is supplied by two Pratt and Whitney “hornet” engines.

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Can Superfighters Stop the Bombers? (Aug, 1949)

Can Superfighters Stop the Bombers?

By Herbert Yahraes
Drawings by Ray Pioch

Are the huge new bombers invincible? Have they made fighters obsolete? Or will big, new “fighter-bombers” be the answer to air defense? Popular Science assigned a tough-minded reporter, with 110 previous military experience, connections, or prejudices, to interview the experts—military, civilian, and scientific. Here is his evaluation of the hottest argument in the history of air power.

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Life-Saving Bomb (Jul, 1950)

Life-Saving Bomb

Here’s the Navy’s newest electronic weapon—it won’t, kill a soul but its underwater sound waves will aid thousands.

By Frank Tinsley

AN electronic bomb which disperses sound instead of shrapnel may save the lives of many survivors of sea disasters.

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Cruising Parachute Driven by Motor (Oct, 1930)

This has a rather Inspector Gadgetish look to it with the extending tail. I’m pretty sure you’d want to put the propeller in the back so you don’t, you know, chop your feet off.

Cruising Parachute Driven by Motor

A PARACHUTE propelled by a two-cylinder gasoline motor is the latest safety device proposed to keep pace with the rapid development of the airplane. The idea, depicted on this month’s cover of Modern Mechanics magazine, was on the verge of an actual try-out by Buddy Bushmeyer, veteran parachute jumper, when he was killed in an airplane accident after he had gone up without a parachute for the first time in his long career as an airman.

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