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MIMI – Sav-A-Life (Jul, 1966)

MIMI
See the man. He is throwing an apple to the lady in the water. The lady puts on a lifesaver and smiles at the camera. The man is angry. He wants his apple back. Now the lady is biting the stem of the apple. Her bathing suit is all dry. The apple is a Sav-A-Life. She is pulling the ring to activate it.

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Lead Shields Protect Men Filming Radium Story (Jan, 1938)

Given that radioactivity was discovered by Henri Becquerel when he noticed that Uranium salts were fogging his photographic plates, you’d think the film makers would have thought of this problem ahead of time.

Lead Shields Protect Men Filming Radium Story

DURING the filming of a motion picture dramatizing the use of radium, elaborate precautions were observed to protect workers from the element’s radiations. The cameraman operated behind a lead shield featuring a glass panel, while a workman who handled the radium used flexible gauntlets of fabricated lead and wool which were attached to a special observation shield of lead and glass.

Production was almost halted when the camera film became cloudy and diffused through exposure to the radium radiations but technicians were able to develop a film suitable for the job.

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Tall Men No Longer Cut Off View (Aug, 1934)

Tall Men No Longer Cut Off View

VIEW of football and baseball games or shows shut off by the tall man or woman wearing a hat in front should not bother spectators any longer with the device pictured at the left.

The instrument works on the principle of the periscope with a mirror in each end. The spectator whose view is obscured places the lower mirror at or near the level of the eye. Upper mirror stretches over his head to whatever height he wishes in order to get an unobstructed view of the game or show. The image is reflected from the upper mirror to the lower.

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I COUNT 150 MILLION NOSES (Jan, 1950)

I COUNT 150 MILLION NOSES

By Philip M. Hauser, Acting Director,
U. S. Bureau of the Census

ONE of these days an inquisitive stranger will knock at your door and start asking questions. Don’t throw him out for he’ll probably be one of our 150,000 workers gathering information for one of Uncle Sam’s most gigantic undertakings—the 1950 Census of Population. Housing and Agriculture!

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‘Wonder Clock’ Hands Turn Once in 26,000 Years (Dec, 1938)

There is a museum dedicated to him in his hometown of Lier Belgium and it looks like they still have this clock available for viewing. It kind of reminds me of a much less ambitious version of the Long Now Clock.

‘Wonder Clock’ Hands Turn Once in 26,000 Years

One master movement controls ninety-three different dials on the “Wonder Clock” built by a Belgian clockmaker. It was brought to this country recently for exhibition at the Museum of Science and Industry in New York. The various faces show the time divisions of the world, the location and movements of the earth, sun, moon, planets and stars, high and low tides at the principal ports and other phenomena—all synchronized by the single movement.

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Scratched Metal Murals (Dec, 1952)

He wound up having quite the career before he passed away in 1966.

Scratched Metal Murals

SHEET aluminum rubbed with steel wool is used by Nikos Bel-Jon of San Francisco to create unusual murals. Greek-born Bel-Jon, who was an artist in Greece and Paris before coming to the United States in 1946, spent 4 years developing his aluminum art technique.

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NEW MACHINES FOR OLD WORK (Sep, 1915)

NEW MACHINES FOR OLD WORK

SAFETY TEA KETTLE
PRESSING the knob raises the lid. This frees one hand.

STORES POWER FOR FARMERS
THE windmill raises gravel to develop power.

MODERN EQUIPMENT FOR WHALING
LARGE steel tanks are rapidly replacing the old-time cask on board the modern whale-ship. It was necessary to cool the oil before filling the old style cask because the heated oil damaged them.

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COAL DIGGERS AND DYNAMITE OUST HOMES (Mar, 1924)

Wow, it must have really sucked for the people who still lived in the neighborhood…

I’m waiting on confirmation Charlie, but it looks like this happened in South Scranton, PA.

COAL DIGGERS AND DYNAMITE OUST HOMES

Steam shovels, locomotives, and dynamite have invaded a residential section of a Pennsylvania city to mine a rich vein of coal that was recently found under the district. Yawning gorges have been blown and dug into the earth at the sides of the streets, where the rumble of heavy machinery is punctuated with blasts of explosives. Great lengths of railroad track have been laid in a winding path through the neighborhood to carry the mined fuel away. Guard rails were built on the brinks of the deep openings to prevent accidents to unwary pedestrians. Thousands of tons of soil, rock, and anthracite coal have been torn from the land since operations began.

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POWER PLANT WASTE WARMS HOTHOUSES (Dec, 1930)

POWER PLANT WASTE WARMS HOTHOUSES

Large power plants warm great quantities of water in their steam condenser systems. Ordinarily this heat is wasted by allowing the warm water to flow back into the river. Those in charge of the city power station for Berlin, Germany, have found a way to utilize this heat by pumping the warm water through heating coils in a large hothouse built next the power plant. Large crops of hothouse vegetables, including the cucumbers used to make dill pickles, have been successfully grown.

This new utilization of waste heat may soon be tried out for similar purposes in the United States.

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Chicago Is Making Her Dream of a Beautiful Metropolis Come True (Oct, 1921)

Chicago Is Making Her Dream of a Beautiful Metropolis Come True

By S.J. Duncan-Clark

REAMS come true. Today the people of Chicago are seeing them come true. A dozen years ago — save for a few men —Chicago scoffed at their possibility. Chicago is to be a city of beauty—Chicago, the lusty-limbed, giant child of the prairie, whom one of her own poets has called “Hog-butcher for the world,” is to take her place among the regal cities of civilization. This is now assured. Faith and works are rapidly converting the dream into visible and substantial form.

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