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CREATING LIFE LIKE Figures For WAX MUSEUMS (Apr, 1935)

CREATING LIFE LIKE Figures For WAX MUSEUMS
by HAROLD L. ZIMMER

Washington, Roosevelt, Billy the Kid, Jesse James! All the world’s most colorful figures stand out with startling reality in a wax museum. This article tells -how workers transfer a simple photograph into amazingly life like figures sculptured in tinted wax.

WHERE do the horrors in the wax museums come from? This question may have troubled you as you paused in a side show for a few pleasant shudders. So realistically are they made, so gruesomely exact in every tiny detail, that it would seem the artist must have had the original models pose especially for him.

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Soviet Engineers Building 80-foot “Glider” Boat (Nov, 1937)

Soviet Engineers Building 80-foot “Glider” Boat
SOVIET engineers are constructing a “glider” speedboat for service on the Black Sea. The boat will have two hulls and carry 150 people at a speed of over 40 m.p.h. Four aviation motors of 675 horsepower each will power the novel craft, which will be 80 feet long with a width of 40 feet. A model of the boat has been placed on public exhibition in Paris, France.

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Carves Novel Objects From Lumps Of Coal (Jul, 1938)

Carves Novel Objects From Lumps Of Coal
CARVING beautiful novelties from lumps of coal is the unique business engaged in by Charles H. Cunningham, of Summit Hill, Pa. Two of his carvings—a fireman’s trumpet and a football—are shown in the photo at right.

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MODERN MIRACLE – SYNTHETIC CHEMISTRY: WEALTH FROM WASTE (Apr, 1939)

MODERN MIRACLE

SYNTHETIC CHEMISTRY: WEALTH FROM WASTE

by John E. Pfeiffer

This is the first of a series of articles on the romance of synthetic chemistry in which science has solved the mystery for turning waste into wealth.

“Don’t throw that away!” This is the battle cry of the great synthetic chemical industry which makes everything from hair-brush handles to T.N.T. from stuff that was once just waste. If you want to buy some perfume, the odds are that the bottle will contain odors extracted from coal tar, once a nightmare to factories who paid people to get rid of it.

But today, whether it’s waste gas, tar, or peanut shells, the chemists want it to sell back to you again in the form of motor fuel, photographic film, or pipe stems. What men do with rubbish would turn the most efficient housewife green with envy and the whole thing only started late last century.

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Ohio Man Patents Compact Body Air Conditioner (Apr, 1934)



AN APPLIANCE designed to – condition the air at the armpits to eliminate perspiration has been patented by Clarence L. Mumaugh, of Lima, Ohio. The appliance consists of two bulb-shaped pumps, one under each armpit, provided with flap valves through which antiseptics and other chemical conditioners can be inserted.

When arm pressure squeezes the bulbs, air, conditioned by the chemicals in the bulb, is forced out through valves, cooling the armpit. Cold virus killer can be inserted in the bulbs a

nd inhaled through a long tube connected to the bulbs as a treatment for colds, if desired.

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Neon Tubes Illuminate Drinks (Mar, 1936)

Neon Tubes Illuminate Drinks
STIRRING rods of neon tube are the latest thing in restaurants. When placed in drinks the tubes, through a chemical reaction, produce unusual fluorescent rays which illuminate the liquid as soon as they are submerged.
The tubes, which measure about six inches in length, are available in various colors to match the desired color scheme. The chemical secret of the device was not revealed.

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BARBERING, BANK ROBBING AND BARTENDING (May, 1954)

BARBERING, BANK ROBBING AND BARTENDING

If your thirst for knowledge is not quenched by ordinary colleges or schools, there are other halls of education open to you.

A suite of offices located somewhere high in the cement jungle of New York City houses one of the most amazing—and most hush-hush—institutions of learning in America. None of the building’s other tenants have the faintest suspicion that it’s a school. The elevator jockeys don’t know and neither do the cleaning women or even the owners. In fact, only a handful of persons is aware of its very existence.

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about torpedo control systems (Sep, 1955)

about torpedo control systems

…AND FORD INSTRUMENT COMPANY

When a torpedo is launched, its control system must solve many problems — not only directing it towards the target, but controlling its depth, speed, and stability.

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Mediumistic Tricks (Nov, 1935)

Mediumistic Tricks

FOR new Hallowe’en thrills, put on a mediumistic party with turban-bedecked medium, darkened room, spirit writing, tables floating in the air, and all the other tricks which fake spirit mediums use so successfully. The mere suggestion, on your invitations, that all weak-hearted persons should stay at home will insure a crowd.

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World’s Longest Bridges Span San Francisco Bay (Mar, 1935)

World’s Longest Bridges Span San Francisco Bay

by CHARLES W. GEIGER

A comprehensive article on the Golden Gate and San Francisco Oakland Bay bridges, telling of man’s struggle with nature to complete, at a tremendous cost, two of the most daring construction feats ever undertaken by American engineers.

HIGH over the surging tides of San Francisco’s Golden Gate, the two towers of the world’s largest single suspension bridge stand in defiant majesty as symbols of man’s victory over natural forces. And farther back, the eight mile skeleton of towers and piers stretch across the San Francisco—-Oakland bay, ready for the spans which will complete this, the world’s most costly bridge project.

These bridges, built at a total cost of $112,000,000, are being erected to aid traffic in and around San Francisco. The bridge to Oakland cuts the 30 mile trek around the circuitous shoreline of the bay to a straight 8-1/4 mile trip across the bridge; the Golden Gate project eliminates a detour of approximately 80 miles for direct coastal traffic between Canada and Mexico.

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