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ROPE MAKERS OF SPAIN TWIST STRANDS BY HAND (Dec, 1933)

It’s kind of crazy to contrast this with the way modern rope is made (video).

ROPE MAKERS OF SPAIN TWIST STRANDS BY HAND

In surroundings that suggest a buried city, its telegraph poles half-covered by sand, native rope makers of Palma, Spain, ply their ancient craft. Actually the “telegraph poles” are frames that support the hemp yarn as it is spun. To do this, one man fastens a bundle of hemp fiber around his waist, attaches one -end to a hand wheel, and slowly walks away, paying out the yarn with his hands. Meanwhile an assistant turns the wheel to twist the yarn into a compact strand. When several such strands have been spun, these in turn are twisted together to form a rope.

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World’s Progress Hastened by Inventions (Oct, 1924)

If you want a really weird example of typesetting check out the last section. In that they:

CAPITALIZE THE WORDS IN THE FIRST LINE OF A PARA-
graph but not the second half of a hyphenated word.

World’s Progress Hastened by Inventions

Seeking New and Improved Methods and Machines to Do Man’s Labor, Many Industries Spur Search with Offers of Reward DESPITE the fleetness with which developments in science and industry have taken their places in the service of man during the past few centuries, untold problems remain to be solved, powerful unknown forces are to be harnessed and hidden sources of new wealth uncovered. Greater demands for time and labor-saving methods and devices are constantly arising, notwithstanding the fact that machinery now performs most of the labor in mill, factory and office.

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The Amateur Telescope Maker’s Page (Oct, 1949)

If you want to get an idea of how much amateur astrophotography and related technologies have come in the last 60 years, check out the image on the top left which was made at the Palomar Observatory. Now look at some of the stunning photos amateurs have taken recently. For comparison, here is one from Hubble and another that is a composite of images from Hubble, Spitzer and GALEX.

The Amateur Telescope Maker’s Page

Conducted by Robert Brightman

Caption:
The giant spiral nebula known as Messier 81. Its distance is three million light-years. The central part consists of stars so close together, it is impossible to resolve them. A time exposure made through Mt. Palomar telescope.

THE sketch at the bottom of this page indicates the method used by Sylvestus B. Burdakin of Elmwood, Connecticut, to achieve an adjustable bearing surface for his alt-azimuth mounting. True, it is a variation of a theme but we think our readers will find it interesting. His letter follows: “Having finished my telescope, I decided to let you know of a couple of ideas that have proved helpful. Although my mirror did not come out perfect I can use it with good results on the moon. Later I intend to make another mirror, and get it perfect, I hope.

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UNFAMILIAR RINGS (Aug, 1945)

UNFAMILIAR RINGS

Rings of life and death, love and hate, from one hundred to several thousand years old, make up a unique collection.

By LOUIS HOCHMAN

IT WAS a beautiful day. The birds and the bees, fluttering about, were busy living up to their reputations. In a cozy corner of an Italian courtyard, back in the early part of the 19th century, two romantic young people were crowding years into brief moments of ecstasy. Again and again their lips made passionate contact as they pledged their undying devotion through all eternity.

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CURIOUS COLLECTIONEERS (Jun, 1953)

CURIOUS COLLECTIONEERS

WHEN the collecting bug bites a hobbiest, one never knows what the outcome will be. Some victims react the usual way and save coins, stamps, match covers, etc., but others aren’t satisfied with interests so ordinary. They choose unique fields, to say the least. But they are equally as fanatic as their more conventional brothers and sisters and consider their collections just as valuable. Here are some of the curious collectioneers and their strange hobbies.

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SCIENCE IN PICTURES (Aug, 1945)

SCIENCE IN PICTURES

Mechanical “Wings” with which the inventor hopes he will be able to fly, are the work of 36-year-old Horace T. Pentecost of Seattle. In his right hand he holds the flight control stick: its handle is the throttle, regulated by turning. The “Hoppicopter,” as the inventor calls it, has a 2-cylinder, 20 hp. motor and weighs 60 pounds plus.

Precipitron an electrostatic air cleaner made by Westinghouse, cleans 23,000 cubic feet of air per minute in this room where lenses for naval optical instruments like periscopes are checked.

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$140,000.00 in Radium for the U.S. (May, 1929)

$140,000.00 in Radium for the U.S.

AN OLD time saying that “Valuable things come in small packages” was borne out recently when the United States customs officials received a shipment of radium from Congo. Africa. $140,000 in radium was delivered in the small box that is shown to the left. This box contained a special lead cylinder within which a glass tube of radium was packed. Lead is the only metal that will keep the penetrating rays of radium in check. This metal not only safeguards the people who must handle the radium but minimizes the chances of breakage.

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My Profits Are Mushrooming (May, 1950)

Check out a the slightly more refined process used today. (video)

My Profits Are Mushrooming

A small corner in your basement and a bit of fungus mold are all you need to start a mushroom farm and grow yourself a big-money business.

By Corwin Fred

BACK in 1929 I knew nothing about running a business. I did know, however, that I wanted one of my own, and I realized it had to be some enterprise I could start without much cash—and learn as I went along.

A few months later the profits had really started mushrooming from my own business—growing and selling mushrooms. As a mushroom farmer, I’ve been squeezed into some tight corners—but I’ve squeezed out again.

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Making Artistic Arc-Welded Objects (May, 1932)

These look like something dredged up from the bottom of the ocean.

Making Artistic Arc-Welded Objects

STUDENTS of an electrical arc welding company’s classes have worked out a scheme for making highly ornamental objects which beat all for uniqueness and distinction. In this novel process, which forms a part of their classroom work, they salvage waste metal and convert it into such articles as shown in the accompanying photos.

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HAVE THEY FOUND THE LOST CONTINENT? (Nov, 1954)

HAVE THEY FOUND THE LOST CONTINENT?

A noted German archaeologist believes he has uncovered the grave of the fabulous city that sank beneath the sea.

By Robert Martin

A TENSE drama was being enacted in the North Sea.

A deep-sea diver was exploring the ocean’s floor as a scholarly looking man stood by the rail of the vessel anchored fathoms above, his ears glued to the headpiece of a telephone line. Suddenly the diver’s voice came crackling over the wire. He had seen something incredibly strange in the phantom world beneath the sea. The man aboard the ship listened intently, then paled. His heart began thumping and his hands shook.

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