Archive
General
GARDEN OF EDEN (Feb, 1951)

GARDEN OF EDEN

The exciting eyes of lovely Eden Hartford have been called a mirror of the “eternal feminine”

LOVELY Eden Hartford looks more like a languorous Eve than the Eden her mother named her. And like Eve, the eternal feminine, Eden becomes decorative in many poses and many guises. That quality is what started the young lady—she’s still only 20—on a professional career a little over a year ago.

.
WHOLE FORESTS TURNED INTO MATCHES (Feb, 1909)

WHOLE FORESTS TURNED INTO MATCHES

By JAMES COOKE MILLS

HE quantity of matchwood used every day for lighting is enormous and the figures representing the total are almost beyond belief. An expert in forestry has just determined after careful computation that the civilized nations of the world strike three million matches every minute of the twenty-four hours.

.
Summer Sky Thrill (Jun, 1946)

Summer Sky Thrill is promised by this airplane wheel, the invention of Harold T. Austin, of Seattle, Wash. Austin got the idea while working on B-29s at the Boeing Aircraft plant during the war and set up this first model in the back of his workshop. The wheel, a 1946 version of the Ferris Wheel, has twelve small planes which rotate on a vertical axis as the wheel goes ’round. The inventor and four former Boeing employees plan to put it into production for carnivals and amusement parks.

.
Keeping up with HOBBY PRODUCTS (Dec, 1950)

Keeping up with HOBBY PRODUCTS

In communicating with companies whose products are described in this department, please mention PROFITABLE HOBBIES.

Christmas Plaques.

Third dimension Christmas greeting plaques made of art plaster are the latest innovation of the Leister Game Co., Toledo, Ohio.

The recent figurine painting fad prompted this firm to introduce this new and unusual type greeting plaque.

.
HOW TO PLEASE YOUR WIFE (Feb, 1951)

Not the article I thought it was going to be.

HOW TO PLEASE YOUR WIFE

IF YOU’VE ever paused before a surrealistic sample of Salvador Dali’s modern art and wondered what the famous painter was trying to convey—brace yourself for further bewilderment. Nowadays you’re likely to see Dalis is being worn as well as hanging in museums.

.
MUIR GLACIER VISIBLE AFTER NINE YEARS (Feb, 1909)

MUIR GLACIER VISIBLE AFTER NINE YEARS

By KATHERINE LOUISE SMITH

SOMETHING wonderful has recently taken place in Alaska. This is the drifting away of icebergs from the front of Muir Glacier in Glacier Bay so that for the first time in nine years this famous glacier, the father of all glaciers, and the most noted on this continent has been visited.

.
Her Cookie Time Is Christmas Time (Dec, 1950)

Her Cookie Time Is Christmas Time

When her fellow townsmen found out about a Milwaukee woman’s Christmas cookies, they swamped her with orders, with no consideration for price.

DORIS ANN KRUPINSKI
Photographs by Doris Ann and Joseph J. Krupinski

Mrs. Earl Jacobson of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, has proved that Christmas cookie baking is not only easy and lots of fun, but profitable too. To those of us who may spend an entire day struggling with one fancy cookie recipe, Mrs. Jacobson’s record of 325 dozen cookies in three days seems unbelievable.

.
“Mine says made in Japan” (Jan, 1969)

I didn’t realize the fear of Japanese manufacturing went back to the sixties. I wonder what flavor it was. “All this cheap crap is made in Japan” or “Oh my god Japan is 20 years ahead of us, pretty soon they’ll own all of America and we’ll all be living in a William Gibson novel.”

“Mine says made in Japan”

.
Scale-Model Farm (Apr, 1948)

I really like the glossy saturated color printing they used in the mid-40′s.

Scale-Model Farm

LEOPOLD ARMBRUSTER, recovering from a leg ailment, found he was a top-flight miniaturist.

He laid a board on his lap (for a bench) and started whittling out a farm building. His fingers flew. His farm grew. In six months it was a vast table-top establishment complete with eight buildings, cows, horses, sheep, hogs, rabbits, chickens, pigeons, people and wagons—all boiled down to a scale of 1/4 in. to 1 ft.—a masterpiece of fine detail.

His buildings come apart and are fully equipped with rooms, furniture, stalls, chutes, etc. Animals and men are molded of clay.

.
Plastic Raincoat for Hats (Oct, 1946)

Plastic Raincoat for Hats

A civilian adaptation of the waterproof hat covers worn by service men during the war is now available. Called Rainat, the cover is made of transparent vinyl plastic film, and is provided in three sizes.

.