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Sand-Blast Artist (Dec, 1955)

Sand-Blast Artist

A student of Old World glassmaking and sculpture creates his own new medium.

THE use of sculpture and glass in religious art is an old story, but Duncan Niles Terry has combined these elements to produce beautiful sculptured glass that graces a number of churches and religious institutions. Glass has interested Terry since childhood, and in addition to his regular art training he spent years in Europe delving into the mysteries of working with Old World blown and stained glass.

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Clothes Make the Man… (Nov, 1953)

Clothes Make the Man…

WOOD-PULP COOK
Men at a western wood-pulp mill who work around sulfuric acid protect every square inch of skin with the new acidproof suit at left. Hood, coat, boots and gloves have pink markings—the same color used to identify acid pipes—to keep the suit from being used in any other area of the Weyerhaeuser Timber plant, Everett, Wash.

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FARMS ARE WATERED BY WIND HARNESSED TO PUMPS (Apr, 1924)

FARMS ARE WATERED BY WIND HARNESSED TO PUMPS

Windmills, resembling those common to Holland, have been found practical for irrigation and power purposes in Kansas. Sufficient water may be pumped from a depth of 75 feet to irrigate a farm of 80 acres with one of the mills which operate two pumps simultaneously.

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MATTRESS CARRIED IN TRUNK UNFOLDS INTO BED (Oct, 1923)

MATTRESS CARRIED IN TRUNK UNFOLDS INTO BED

A trunk and a bed have been combined in a large boxlike container, capable of holding a folded mattress and a number of drawers. When traveling, the mattress tits against and keeps the drawers closed. In preparing the combination for a bed, the trunk is placed on its side and the mattress taken from the end, thus giving access to the bedding in the drawers. A comfortable bed may then be made up on the top of the trunk, providing a convenient means for accommodating a guest.

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Artist’s Idea of the “City of Tomorrow” (Jun, 1934)

Artist’s Idea of the “City of Tomorrow,” Constructed of Glass in Steel Frames; a Practical Process for This Work Is Being Used in Building a New York Filling Station, Similar to the One Shown in the Foreground; the Glass Walls Lend Themselves to Unusual Lighting Effects

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750 Million Lumps of Sugar Every Day (Mar, 1950)

750 Million Lumps of Sugar Every Day

By Andrew R. Boone

THE drawing here and the photographs on the next three pages tell the story behind the lump of sugar you dropped into your coffee this morning. They show how the world’s largest cane-sugar refinery turns brownish, gummy raw sugar into sparkling, crystalline grains and cubes.

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New York Plans Greatest Fair (Apr, 1934)

New York Plans Greatest Fair

by A. L. White

IN 1939 all the world will help America celebrate the 150th anniversary of the inauguration of George Washington as first President of the United States. The event took place in New York City ,and to mark the occasion Gotham is building the greatest international exposition in annals of world fairs.

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Million – Dollar “Spectacular” World’s Biggest Advertisement (Aug, 1936)

Million – Dollar “Spectacular” World’s Biggest Advertisement

TIMES SQUARE, where the Gay White Way bursts into volcanic illumination, has seen many electric moving signs — “spectaculars” they call them—since these were invented. A quarter-century ago, the Chariot Race (from Ben Hur) blazed down on the square. Its latest record-breaking acquisition is pitched at a slower-moving, good-natured tempo, in accordance with the mood of its “prospects.”

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NEW YORK’S EXOTIC CHINATOWN (Oct, 1952)

NEW YORK’S EXOTIC CHINATOWN

You’ll find the excitement of another world in the famous domain ruled by the tongs by Herbert Asbury

ON the way to Chinatown from mid-town New York, the sight-seeing bus turned into the Bowery, and the guide said: “We are now entering what I have nicknamed the ‘Street of Forgotten Men,’ the home of the famous Bowery bum. It’s late in the day, but if you’ll look close you may see a bum sleeping off last night’s drunk on the sidewalk. If you spot one call out, so we can all see.”

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Fighting Oil Fires with Mud and Steam (May, 1929)

Fighting Oil Fires with Mud and Steam

By RAY ALLAN

Tunneling 50 feet beneath the surface of the earth to tap the casing of a burning oil well, California firemen subdued the fierce flames by injecting a mixture of mud and live steam into the heart of the flaring well.

WHEN nature goes on a rampage and expresses her feelings in the form of a gas or oil blowout in the oil fields, the fire which frequently accompanies the upheaval would tax the resources of a metropolitan fire department.

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