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War
Enemy Weapons are Enemies Still (Sep, 1946)

Enemy Weapons are Enemies Still

By DAVID P. McNAMARA

ON A peaceful street in Brooklyn, nearly a year after the war had ended, eight American boys were badly wounded when a German 20-mm. shell exploded.

The shooting is not over yet for many of the German pistols, Italian bullets and Jap grenades that souvenir-hunting GIs brought home. Those Brooklyn boys “got theirs” from a shell that they had found in a junkyard, pried apart with a nail, and ignited with a match.

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Replica of Tank Is Made of Soap (Feb, 1930)

Replica of Tank Is Made of Soap

ONE hundred and thirty pounds of soap were used in the construction of a replica of a giant army tank at a recent soap exposition in Berlin, Germany. Cakes and slabs and sheets of soap were used throughout, pieces of soap being carved down to small knobs to represent hundreds of rivets in carrying out the details of the work. Happy soldiers maintain it would be an easy task for an army equipped with such soap tanks to “clean up” any opponent.

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Ancient War Machines (Dec, 1955)

Ancient War Machines

Replicas of some of the ancient engines of war make fascinating and educational model projects.

ALTHOUGH the advent of the jet plane, atomic gun and submarine has changed the aspect of warfare so considerably that it could hardly be recognized by anyone living a hundred years ago, primitive and ancient war machines still continue to fire the imagination of boys of all ages. Authentic replicas of some of the major weapons of the ancients make fascinating model projects, and with this in mind, MI asked model maker Eugene Thomas to specially build a set of these models and draw up easy-to-follow plans.

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GUARDING NEW YORK’S BRIDGES (Apr, 1917)

GUARDING NEW YORK’S BRIDGES

IN THE SHADOW OF BROOKLYN BRIDGE

Because of the impending foreign crises, these guards are always on the watch to prevent meddling.

Ready for Any Contingency

Equipped with rifles and rapid fire guns, the Second Battalion of the New York State naval militia is detailed to the task of keeping cranks and over wrought foreign sympathizers from damaging our traffic links.

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SCIENCE IS A PRISONER OF WAR (Sep, 1946)

SCIENCE IS A PRISONER OF WAR

WHO won the war is already an old argument. But certainly science, forging the final weapon, stopped the war. Yet, a year later, science is still literally a prisoner of war.

When science was mobilized, the military services quite properly invaded the universities. They had to halt the basic research. They put the men and machines of science to work on the pressing necessities that mothered radar, sonar, loran, and a thousand other urgent applications of that basic research. The scientists did their work well, including the actual manufacture of such things as the rockets and the trained atoms.

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America’s Floating Power Plants (Jun, 1941)

That was a bit of wishful thinking: “The 2nd World War, unlike the 1st, has not developed into wholesale slaughter of humans.”

America’s Floating Power Plants

Should the United States be attacked, these new ships will supply light, heat and power to cities whose power plants have been bombed or sabotaged.

THE armada of floating “stand-by” electrical power barges which the United States plans to station along our waterways adjacent to important production centers, is the direct result of lessons being learned by American observers in the present war in Europe.

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Control the Weather and Control the World (Jun, 1956)

Control the Weather and Control the World

Will we win the crucial race to gain mastery over this most devastating of all weapons?

By Dick Halvorsen

WORLD WAR III, if it comes, may be won or lost, within 48 hours—and without a single A-bomb dropped or a single shot fired. We could win the next Big One by harnessing the mightiest physical force in the world: the hitherto uncontrollable weather.

Fanciful nonsense? Crazy day-dreaming? Science-fiction? Not a bit of it. Consider these startling facts: A hurricane expends more energy in one minute than all the electrical power produced in the United States in the past 50 years. . .

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WWI German Prisoner’s Ovo-Art (Apr, 1917)

Undoubtedly in WW III the robot drone prisoners will take up this very same hobby.

PASSING THE IDLE HOURS German captives in France, in order to puncture the deadly monotony, spend their time making toys out of egg shells, paper, and bread crusts, for the peasant children.

THREE EXAMPLES OF OVO-ART On the left we have a Russian soldier ogling a bottle of vodka—the label on this bottle had to be translated twice in order to appear in English. On the right is the brother-in-law of Lewis Carroll’s March Hare.

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THIS is everyone’s War… (Dec, 1942)

THIS is everyone’s War… if you are not able to serve in the Army or Navy, you can serve on the production front. Elmer is doing his duty by leaving his non-essential position and taking a job in the war plant.

THE HAMMARLUND MFG. CO., Inc., 460 WEST 34th St., NEW YORK, N. Y.

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FOUND – The Weapon That Will Win The War (Jun, 1941)

FOUND – The Weapon That Will Win The War

The greatest scientists of the world’s most powerful nations have searched in vain for what a Bulgarian refugee, without fanfare or hullabaloo, has found after years of patient and painstaking experiment in his laboratory. The secret is now America’s!

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