Archive
War
THE HOMOSEXUAL WHO WRECKED AN EMPIRE (Mar, 1960)

I just thought this was so ridiculous I had to post it.

THE HOMOSEXUAL WHO WRECKED AN EMPIRE

His queer pleasures drove him to treason—and started a world war!

By STEFAN v. S. RUBELCU

THE APARTMENT was a decorator’s dream, luxuriously tricked out with all kinds of feminine frills and heavy with the sickening sweet odors of perfume and incense. Almost daintily, the figure in the lush room touched a manicured finger to a baroque wooden floral decoration on the pearl-inlaid wall panelling. Noiselessly, a door slid open, disclosing a capacious closet crammed with obviously expensive female apparel.

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He advanced the bombing of Hiroshima by at least a year! (Nov, 1946)

If the bombing had been pushed back a year, do you think the war would have lasted? If not, then you could make the case that Japan got nuked because this guy was trying to build a uranium light bulb.

Also, I find the exclamation point at the end of this sentence strangely disturbing:

(Little did they realize that their know-how would one day give America a head start in the race towards history’s grimmest goal!)

He advanced the bombing of Hiroshima by at least a year!

This is a “now it can be told” story of wartime research.

It started back in post World War I days when Dr. Harvey C. Rentschler, Director of Research for the Westinghouse Lamp Division, and Dr. J. W. Marden, an associate, decided to determine the melting point of a rare mineral . . . uranium.

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WAR SIDELIGHTS (Jun, 1917)

WAR SIDELIGHTS

THE AMERICAN GIRL RUSHES TO SAVE HER COUNTRY

The Naval Reserves in Oakland, California, now are receiving many recruits— for the wireless and
first aid divisions of the service—from the fairest daughters of California. The photograph shows
Miss Lillian Marriott of Oakland, passing her “physical”.

THEIR MATTRESSES WILL SAVE THEM
Besides providing restful accommodations, these mattresses—belonging to recruits at the Newport Naval Training Station—are also efficient life preservers.

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The fight on the doorstep (Apr, 1944)

The fight on the doorstep

THIS WAR can’t be won on battlefields alone. One of the most critical campaigns of all must be waged right on the doorstep of every family in America.

This is the fight against higher prices and higher wages. It’s a fight that must be won… or victories in battle will be meaningless.

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Automatic Aiming Cannon Could Hit Invisible Aircraft (Feb, 1929)

Automatic Aiming Cannon Could Hit Invisible Aircraft

New anti-aircraft gun aims itself by sounding device to guard America from air raiders.

PEOPLE who lived in London during the late World War will vividly recall the feeling of helplessness that possessed them when Germany bombed that city on several occasions.

They will tell you that the murderous cargoes of bombs were dropped from Zeppelins and Gothas which cruised the thin upper realms of the heavens with nothing more harmful than an occasional searchlight beam touching them. The anti-aircraft guns were powerless. Why? Any aviator familiar with anti-aircraft ordnance could tell you. He would laugh at the thought of an anti-aircraft gun actually scoring a direct hit. Planes brought down by shrapnel from the ground were planes that were just “in the way,” he would tell you.

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UNDERSEA SPIES (Feb, 1946)

UNDERSEA SPIES

BY JAMES NEVIN MILLER

BACK in December, 1944, Lieut. Earl E. Cook of Seattle, won the Navy Cross for a unique achievement. First, in a successful effort to locate three enemy depth bombs known to be in immediate danger of detonation, he dove deep inside a patrol bomber sunk in a vital channel off Oahu, Hawaii. Then for three never-to-be-forgotten days he directed a six-man team of divers which finally recovered the death-dealing weapons.

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Balloons on Helmet Make Targets for Cavalry Combat (Jul, 1931)

Balloons on Helmet Make Targets for Cavalry Combat

PUNCTURING a balloon on the head of an opponent with the skillful thrust of a rapier is the unique means employed by cavalry students to score points when engaging in “armed combat” at Urban Military Academy at Beverly Hills, California. The balloons are tied to the helmets of the combatants, and the first fighter to burst the balloon of an “enemy” wins the encounter.

Although swordsmanship is a thing of the past, as far as modern warfare is concerned, this kind of practice is of service in teaching agility, alertness and horsemanship. The contest is a part of the training for the annual spring maneuvers of the academy.

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AIR WAR OVER THE ARCTIC (Mar, 1949)

AIR WAR OVER THE ARCTIC

Our planes are waging a relentless battle to conquer polar cold and guard America against sneak attacks across the world’s roof.

By Major General K. P. McNaughton, U. S. Air Force

FOR nearly four centuries the Arctic defied the hardiest explorers from the temperate zones. This vast ice-locked world with its midnight sun, Aurora Borealis and paralyzing cold has been an impregnable barrier across the shortest route between the East and West.

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CAN THIS WAR BE WON? (Feb, 1940)

Who can forget the horrifying newsreel footage of Germany’s subterranean bore worm tanks crashing through the tunnel walls of the Maginot line?

CAN THIS WAR BE WON?

Modern fortifications along the Maginot and Siegfried lines have made France and Germany “invasion proof.” The result may be a war no nation can win!

by Maxwell Hamilton

WHAT happens when an irresistible force meets an immovable object?

This age-old problem in physics, a familiar question to every school boy, seems destined to find an answer in Europe’s latest armed conflict. For the present “war to end wars” is a contest between two of the world’s! greatest immovable objects—the Siegfried and the Maginot lines!

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Washington’s Brassy Influence Peddlers (Mar, 1960)

Sadly, this seems pretty tame by comparison with what is considered normal today.

Washington’s Brassy Influence Peddlers

Retired generals and admirals cozy up to their old buddies to swing billions of dollars in defense contracts!

By FRANK DEGNAN

LAST JULY, three of the largest defense contractors in the nation readied plans to entertain Air Force Lt. General Bernard S. Schriever, head of the Air Research and Development Command. Party invitations described the affair as cocktails and dinner with an off-the-record chat by General Schriever about his plans and problems.

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