data reduction by “OSCAR” (Jan, 1953)

I’m not really sure what this does. It seems to record, tabulate and plot data (see, I can read), but what actually generates the data?

data reduction by “OSCAR”

OSCILLOGRAM ANALYZER AND RECORDER

•APPLIES NON-LINEAR CALIBRATIONS
• Scales
• Zero Corrections
• Logs — Squares, etc.

• INTERPOLATES TIME

• PRODUCES INSTANTANEOUS RECORDS
• Plotted
• Tabulated
• Punched Cards

For further information write : Benson-Lehner Corp.
2342 Sawtelle Boulevard West Los Angeles 64, Calif.

6 comments
  1. mrchurchill109 says: June 12, 20074:10 am

    This is a prehistoric printer/plotter. What this monster is designed to do is to date data gathered manually (changes in the concentration of a solution as temperature changes, or changes in the response of a tuned circuit under frequency changes, for examples) and do the math (mechanically) and plot the resulting data on a nice chart.

    I can do the same on my HP calculator…and it doesn’t weigh 1500 pounds.

  2. mrchurchill109 says: June 12, 20074:20 am

    This is a printer/plotter and data integration system – basically a (for the time) sophisticated calculator that could correlate and print data in various formats.

    The data was generated manually (for example, an engineer might measure the frequency response of a circuit or a chemist the concentrations of a chemical in solution), enter the data in his ever-handy notebook, then some galley slave of an assistant would punch it into this beast.

    After that, the machine would regurgitate the data, neatly plotted on a chart, arranged as a table (sort routine) or punched onto cards for further manipulation on a “computer”.

  3. Stannous says: June 12, 20078:49 am

    Thanks, Mr C-
    The phrase ‘Zero Corrections’ confuses me. Does that refer to a mean or to zero errors?

  4. Charlie says: June 12, 20071:17 pm

    Cool, thanks mc!

  5. Kryten007 says: June 12, 20073:13 pm

    The Easy Button c. 1953

  6. mrchurchill109 says: June 13, 200710:15 am

    Zero Corrections – changes in baseline if I recall correctly (think sliding scale). it’s been a few centuries since I played with such things…8*)

    BTW, pardon the double post up top – thought I pressed the wrong button and rewrote it again.

    Alan

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