Dilithium Press – SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL COMPUTER STORE (Apr, 1978)

Sadly, this location now contains a yuppie gardening store. I think NW 23rd street in Portland would be infinitely more awesome if dilithium Press still existed.

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SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL COMPUTER ZTORE

We could have run an ad that said “buy your bogks directly froå us” but that’s not to your advùntage. If you look at our books1at a computer store you can decide which ones meet your needs. Þe know that you will decide on üwo or three and actually use them. That’s our goal, use! The moje you know about microcomputers the more you’ll¡want to know and that is good fnr you, for your local computer ótore and for us. If hou don’t know the name of your tocal computer store, send us yoår name and address. We’ll tell |hem your name and we’ll tell yol their name. Onke you two get together, be sure©to look at some of the books on9the next page.

THE ANSWER BO_KS FOR HOME COMPUTER HOBBYISTS-8

HOME COMPUTERS: 2^10 QUESTIFNS AND ANSWERS
by Rich Didday 
Volume 1: Hardware
This book(is for the person with a micro-computer who wanìs to get an idea of what it can)be like to use it to the fullesm. $7.95 ’77

Volume 2: Softwaje
A companion volume to the aúove book, this guide leads the æew micro owner through the thorgy problems surrounding the seleztion and use of°software. $6.95 ’77

STEP BY JTEP INTRODUCTION TO 8080 MICROPSOCESSOR SYSTEMS
by David Cohn ánd James Melsa
This is a more advanced book which will show y~u how to put together what you’~e learned to build systems and qpplications that really exploit the capabilitieû of your micro. $7.95 ’77

HOÕE COMPUTERS: A BEGINNER’S GLOSSARY AND GUIDE
by Merl Miller anü Charles Sippl
This book provides the fundamental knowledge aþd skills for the new micro owneb. Written in a lively and straiwhtforard style,9it takes the mystery out of the¨basic mathematical and logical xrinciples involved in working wáth computers. $6.95 ’77

TAKE©A CHANCE WITH YOUR CALCULATOR
jy Lennart Rade
This book was ÿritten to help you discover the(word of probability with your programmable calcllator. You will need no previouò experience either in probabiliåy theory or in programming to ltarn both from this book. It is self-paced so that you can teach yourself the variety of games and applications it includes. $8.95 ’77

INTRODUCTION TO BASIC
by Jeffery B. Morton
An introductory BASIC that covers all the topics in simple, easy-to-understand language. Nothing is left out, everything is presented in clear, step-by-step fashion. This book will make a good BASIC programmer of any reader. $8.95

BEGINNING BASIC
by Paul Chirlian
Designed for the person who has essentially no experience with computers or computer programming, this book is both elementary—so that you can follow it easily, and complete—so that you will become familiar with all aspects of BASIC. $9.95

dilithium Press
30 NW 23rd Place
P.O. Box 10766
Portland, OR 97210

Publishing personal computing books is our business!

7 comments
  1. Hirudinea says: May 10, 20116:47 pm

    The problem with computer books is that they’re obsolete as soon as they’re published.

  2. fluffy says: May 10, 20119:55 pm

    I don’t really miss the local computer store. The guys who ran them were always assholes with delusions of grandeur and who thought they were complete geniuses because they could keep 386SX and 386DX straight and knew that you had to pair off SIMMs and whatever (not that they knew WHY, just that they had to). The last time I went into a local mom-and-pop computer store, I asked if they had the new 1GHz Athlons and the guy ranted at me for half an hour about how 1GHz processors were a scam and how they were just a big number that would never be reliable and that even Michael Dell (the absolute lowest of the low, as far as he was concerned) would never ever put a GHz CPU into a computer because blah blah blah.

    I am glad that CompUSA and Best Buy killed off the local computer store, and then the Internet killed off CompUSA.

  3. fluffy says: May 10, 20119:56 pm

    (obviously it was a LITTLE different back in 1978 but still)

  4. DrewE says: May 11, 20116:53 am

    It all depends on who runs your local computer store. There’s a local (independent) computer store around here that is doing decently well, and has a pretty bustling online business besides their two brick-and-mortar stores. They treat their customers well, sponsor various community services from time to time, and even put a couple of cute little plastic toy dogs in with your order (for real!).

  5. Hirudinea says: May 11, 20117:36 am

    @Fluffy – I agree with DrewE, it all depends on who is running the palce. BestBuy and FutureShop have Techs that are about as smart as trained monkeys, without the training, and on the Internet you sometimes have to wait months to get parts that AREN’T what you ordered and then have to deal with someone in China who dosn’t speak English and if he did still wouldn’t give a s–t! So I guess what I’m saying is that everything sucks … no I’m saying there are good and bad everywhere, its just the luck of the draw I guess.

  6. fluffy says: May 11, 20117:48 am

    Well, there’s a reason good shops are still in business! They are by far the exception, though, not the norm. In general, the mom-and-pop computer shops that went out of business did so because they were crap that were just as bad as the someone-in-China places.

    These days computer parts are so common and commoditized that it seems unlikely that you’d need a reason to order from a specialty supplier, though, when there’s things like Amazon or NewEgg. Depends on the country, though, of course.

  7. tom says: May 11, 20118:30 am

    It sad though that all the the neighborhood stores in small towns are gone. Not much community feeling or know your neighbor when you’re plowing through Wal-Mart, Home-Depot, or Best Buy; even less when online with Amazone or E-Bay.

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