Guy De Maupasant – KING of All Short Story Writers (Feb, 1909)

Guy De Maupasant – KING of All Short Story Writers

For the first time ever presented American readers the ONLY COMPLETE Edition, absolutely unexpurgated, in English of this great French writer, translated from the Original Manuscripts by linguists of literary distinction. Wonderful Critical Preface by Paul Bourget, of the French Academy.

TALES OF REALISM —RARE ORIENTAL AND PARISIAN STUDIES.

De Maupassant wrote with the conviction that in life there could be no phase so noble or so mean, so honorable or so contemptible, so lofty or so low as to be unworthy of chronicling—no groove of human virtue or fault, success or failure, wisdom or folly that did not possess its own peculiar psychological aspect and therefore demanded analysis.

Robust in imagination and fired with natural passion, his psychological curiosity kept him true to human nature, while at the same time his mental eye when fixed upon the most ordinary phases of human conduct, could see some new motive or aspect of things hitherto unnoticed by the careless crowd.

His dramatic instinct was supremely powerful. He seems to select unerringly the one thing in which the soul of the scene is prisoned, and, making that his keynote, gives a picture in words which haunts the memory like a strain of music.

These marvelous quaint, delicious stories should be a part of every library. Here are given tales of travel and adventure, of mystery and dread, of strange medical experiences, of love and lust, of comedy, and pathos that hovers upon the borders of comedy, and of tragedy.

MORE REALISTIC THAN BALZAC. MORE ENTERTAINING THAN THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.

“Maupassant was the painter of humanity in words. Without hatred, without love, without anger, without pity, merciless as fire, immutable as fate, he holds a mirror up to life without attempting judgment.” Anatole France, Member of the French Academy.

327 Stories. Nearly 6000 Pages. Actual Size 8×5-1/2.

SEVENTEEN BEAUTIFUL VOLUMES OF DELIGHTFUL READING consisting of over 5.500 pages, printed from a new cast of French Elzevir type—elegant and clear—on pure white antique egg-shell finished paper, made especially for this edition. Pages have deckle edges and liberal margins. There are 30 illustrations from original drawings. The books are exquisitely bound in Blue Vellum De Luxe Cloth, with distinctive brown and gold title label, silk headbands and gold tops.

We reserve the right to withdraw this offer or raise the prices without notice.

OUR GUARANTEE: Only one complete edition has ever been published In English, and the prices have been beyond the reach of but a few, After many months of ceaseless endeavor, we succeeded in securing the right to publish a limited number of sets, and offer them, for introductory purposes only, at the remarkably low price of $24.00 a set, on small monthly installments. A strictly subscription set—$51.00 value. Thus it is within the means or all. We have also arranged to send these beautiful books, all express charges prepaid, and allow you the privilege of ten days examination. If they are not as represented, or unsatisfactory, return them at our expense. CAN ANY OFFER BE MORE FAIR?

COUPON SAVES 50%. You run no risk — MAIL IT NOW.

THE WERNER COMPANY Akron, Ohio. Please send me, charges prepaid, for examination, the complete works of Guy de Maupassant, in Seventeen (17) Volumes, bound in Blue Vellum De Luxe Cloth. If satisfactory, I will remit you $2.00 at once and $2.00 per month for eleven (11) months. If not satisfactory, I will advise you within ten days.

THE WERNER COMPANY, Akron, O.

3 comments
  1. Hirudinea says: April 4, 20139:35 pm

    This guy wrote some pretty good stories. (Of course I only know the translations.)

  2. jayessell says: April 5, 20138:07 pm

    The girl in the illustration worked for Houdini when he was still working
    out the bugs in his act.

  3. quadibloc says: April 6, 20136:18 pm

    I knew that at least one of his short stories was considered sufficiently free of salacious material to be used in the readers we had in Junior High. A bit of Internet searching turned up the one I partly remembered: The Necklace.

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