Household Engineer Degree (Mar, 1932)

The assumption being that the men do…

Household Engineer Degree

THE modern housewife should learn electrical engineering to enjoy the full benefits of modern household devices like vacuum cleaners and electric refrigerators. Many millions of dollars expended on such devices are now wasted because housewives who use them do not know how to get the most out of them.

9 comments
  1. Charlene says: December 5, 20112:13 am

    Silly Charlie: the use of these items was beneath the dignity of any man. But these dumm wimmen are (sigh) just so incompetent, even at the jobs lowly enough to be theirs, that something just has to be done to improve their tiny little brains.

  2. M.S.W. says: December 5, 20118:37 am

    Ironic. These days millons of dollars are expended on designing these devices to last only as long as the warranty no matter how much/little you use them to their full benifit. Not to mention the millons of dollars wasted to bling them with internet access and millons upon millons to just advertise to the sheeple to purchase them…

  3. JMyint says: December 5, 20119:08 am

    Ironic that in 1932 only about half of all US households even had electricity. This little column filler was probably written by someone who did not even understand electricity. Me, I am an engineer and I don’t use any of that knowledge to help my wife with the vacuuming and putting up leftovers in the fridge. I did however use some of that engineering education to wire up a new outlet with its own breaker for the deep freeze.

    So I am thinking that the author of this little blurb was perhaps proposing that if women wanted electrical appliances they should learn how to wire their own homes.

  4. Kosher Ham says: December 5, 201111:25 am

    Don’t really understand Vacuum cleaners? That must really suck!

  5. Richard says: December 5, 201112:54 pm

    Need training in electrical engineering just to USE a 1930′s refrigerator? Preposterous!

    But it reminds me of a family reunion when three engineers, with aerospace, computer science, and electrical engineering degrees, were huddled around a microwave which was unfamiliar to them, trying to figure out how to defrost food.

    Some microwave designers really have mastered the art of obfuscating the steps required for a simple task.

  6. hwertz says: December 5, 20115:55 pm

    “Some microwave designers really have mastered the art of obfuscating the steps required for a simple task.”
    Hear hear! Extra buttons or not, you *SHOULD* be able to type a time, and hit start*. If you don’t want high power, type a time, hit some power button to switch between low/medium/high or whatever, and hit start. If you want to stop it early, push “stop”. Simple. But! I’ve used several where someone had to show me how to use it, they (the microwave maker) assumed you’d want to pick “popcorn”, “hot dog’”, “casserole” off it instead of just typing a time to the point that it was difficult to just type a time and let it cook.

    *Well, the old Radar Range made it even easier — turn the knob to the time. If you wanted it to stop it early crank it back to 0.

  7. Charlie says: December 5, 20119:53 pm

    My dad bought a used commercial restaurant one on eBay. It’s great for him because besides being insanely powerful, you can program all the buttons for whatever time/power combo you want so it’s really one touch.

  8. Charlie says: December 5, 20119:55 pm

    Also, I really like this microwave hack. It will automatically play a YouTube clip that is exactly as long as your food has to cook. http://blog.makezine.co…

  9. Michael, N5RLR says: December 11, 20111:35 pm

    It may be just me, but the message I derived from this ad was one of self-reliance, which I advocate. Housewives (and others!) would be benefited by learning at least the basics of how household appliances operate, and how to maintain/repair them.

    Ofttimes a device’s useful life can be extended by cleaning and when necessary making small repairs before a problem evolves into a major headache, expense and replacement.

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