Huge Typewriter Really Works (Nov, 1937)

Huge Typewriter Really Works
SO HUGE that its keys must be operated with the feet, a mammoth typewriter has been placed on exhibition at Atlantic City, N. J. One of its giant type bars is seen about to strike, above, as a champion typist dictates a challenge to rivals.

11 comments
  1. jayessell says: May 19, 20073:41 pm

    Someone should recreate this photo using modern technology.

    http://www.damnfunnypic…

    Meh. It’s a start.

  2. jayessell says: May 19, 20073:42 pm

    Someone should re-do this but with modern technology.

    http://www.damnfunnypic…

    Meh. It’s a start.

  3. Stannous says: May 19, 20077:09 pm

    I love that she has to do it in a bathingsuit and high heels!

    Wonder if it still exists…
    nah, probably been replaced by a giant iBook!

  4. jayessell says: May 21, 20075:01 am

    Darn big keyboard:

    http://www.damnfunnypic…

    (Disqualified. Non-Functional.)

  5. jayessell says: May 21, 20076:31 pm

    Dang!
    I keep posting comments, and nothing happens!

    Google for “Giant Keyboard” and skip the musical ones (as seen in the motion picture “Big”).

  6. Charlie says: May 21, 200710:34 pm

    Jayssell: Fixed. Sorry about that, for some reason Askimet marked your comment as spam. It shouldn’t do that again, but if you have that problem again please email me and I’ll fix it. It did that to stannous once too. I’m not sure why.

  7. [...] Link to Huge Typewriter Really Works (Nov, 1937) [...]

  8. NikFromNYC says: January 14, 20083:24 pm

    This 21 year old babe is now 91. Damn!

  9. Baron Waste says: January 24, 200811:19 pm

    That’s interesting: The “world’s champion typist” is a guy. You wouldn’t expect that.

  10. zak says: July 20, 20082:29 pm

    you think the patent holders sued dc over all the times they had these in batman

  11. Early Office Museum says: January 2, 20096:51 pm

    For several earlier images of very large typewriters that were used for promotional purposes in parades and at world’s fairs, see the following page at the Early Office Museum web site:

    http://www.officemuseum…!!!.htm

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