INFECTION MAYBE FATAL (Oct, 1934)

Before penicillin this was probably true.

INFECTION MAYBE FATAL

PROTECT EVERY CUT

Neglect may lead to amputation—even death. Treat cuts, scratches or blisters with antiseptic and cover with Drybak Band-Aid, quickly, easily and safely. Drybak Band-Aid is the only ready-to-use adhesive bandage with these features:— waterproof backing, sun tan color, individually wrapped. At your druggist’s.

DRYBAK BAND-AID
Waterproof

8 comments
  1. Neil Russell says: November 20, 20079:30 am

    Amputation right there could be pretty serious!

  2. Blurgle says: November 20, 200712:45 pm

    It was. Calvin Coolidge’s son developed a small blister on his foot from playing tennis. A week later he was dead of septicemia.

  3. Paul C. says: November 20, 20071:23 pm

    With mrsa and some of the other things going around now, it may become a possibility again.

  4. Firebrand38 says: November 20, 20075:05 pm

    That and ignorant parents not vaccinating their kids.

  5. Blurgle says: November 20, 20077:24 pm

    Although I agree with you on the vaccine point, I don’t believe there is a vaccine against S. aureus.

  6. Firebrand38 says: November 20, 20079:17 pm

    True, I was speaking of diseases in general. You are correct Blurgle that there is no vaccination for Staphylococcus aureus.

  7. Palms Hotel says: November 20, 200710:18 pm

    Abraham Lincoln’s son Todd died of a carbuncle (boil). Lincoln never got over the loss and today they would just put some neosporin or polysporin on it and the kid would grow up and forget all about it.

  8. Jo says: November 21, 20076:09 pm

    The very first patient I ever cared for as a student nurse was a woman in her 90′s who’d been a nurse during the Great War. Her father had died in the early part of the century from septicemia–he’d gotten a cut on his big toe. The resultant infection took two weeks to kill him.

    With the prevalence of MRSA and drug-resistant strains of other bugs, it won’t be long before we’re back to using honey on wounds and maggots on a regular basis, not just for wound debridement.

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