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Apr, 1917
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Oct, 1921
THE MANUFACTURE OF FINE MIRRORS
A Trade That Is Near to an Art When milady stops before the crystal of her dresser, she doubtless does not realize the time, patience, and skill that has been put into the manufacture of this perfect image-maker.
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CROSSING THE DESERT BY GASOLINE CAMEL
By DAVID WILLIAMS IN the great State of California, Mother Nature exhibits many of her caprices. Here are cloud capped mountains so high that snow never leaves them. Valleys so deep that their floors are below the sea level and which have temperatures which would have furnished old-time terrorist preachers with a wealth of lurid metaphors.
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PISTOL BILLIARDS
THE NOVEL GROUND PISTOL This game device has been invented by George S. Gumaer, of Coronado, California. The barrel of the pistol rests fiat on the ground while the grip is two or three feet above the ground at the end of an upwardly extending inclined handle. The spring-actuated trigger has its lower end pointed to engage in the notched portion of a cylindrica
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THE AERIAL NEMESIS OF SUBMARINES
THE AERIAL NEMESIS OF SUBMARINES HUNTING THE UNDERSEA PIRATES This remarkable photograph depicts clearly the type of small dirigible now being used by the French and British in hunting German submarines. The gas bag is short and stubby when compared to the latest rigid types of Zeppelins, and as a result, great speed is not […]
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THIRTY MAN-POWER POSTAL SORTING MACHINE
By D. H. BACH INSTALLED at the Chicago post-office is a new and striking machine for distributing mail. It looks like a monster typewriter attached to a belt conveyor, and is the first mechanical letter distributor to be adopted by any post-office.
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WAR SIDELIGHTS
WAR SIDELIGHTS THE AMERICAN GIRL RUSHES TO SAVE HER COUNTRY The Naval Reserves in Oakland, California, now are receiving many recruits— for the wireless and first aid divisions of the service—from the fairest daughters of California. The photograph shows Miss Lillian Marriott of Oakland, passing her “physical”. THEIR MATTRESSES WILL SAVE THEM Besides providing restful […]
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WHEN A CABLE SNARLS
By C.L. EDHOLM WHAT happens when a submarine cable is dragged by a ship's anchor is shown in the accompanying photographs ; this accident occurred to the New York Telephone Company's connections between Brooklyn and lower Manhattan. A steamer, trying to make its pier, was carried too far by the swift current under the Brooklyn Bridge. Dropping its anchor, it caught the cables lying on the bottom beneath the bridge.
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HOW TO MAKE A PHONOGRAPH
By WALTER LEE IN case any person of a mechanical turn of mind wishes to try his hand at building a talking machine, I will explain what I used and how I used it. But before I do so, it may be well to explain, in a general way, the principle of phonography, so that the experimenter will know just what he is doing and why he is doing it that way.
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NOVELTIES IN JEWELRY
By ARTHUR DUCLOS ACCORDING to Maiden Lane, the famous source of jewelry designs, there is really no reason ' why watches have to be round. The designers are proving this by bringing forward this year some very bewitching watches of every shape and size. Most of these designers are now putting out oval and square watches, making the face of the watch also square, oblong, or oval. One designer has even made the face of his watches in the shape of a triangle.
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Little Oddities of Life
Lanky Bob Fitzsimmons Dons the Gloves Again Not against Jess Willard, however. This time Bob has tackled even a sturdier and more wiry foe—His Satanic Majesty. Mr. Fitzsimmons has announced his intention of starting a career as an evangelist. QUINTUPLETS? Here are "Bill". "Hill", "Will", 'Phil", and John Smythe of Oklahoma. John has his back turned, but you may take our word for the fact that his face matches . What is your explanation of this extraordinary photograph?
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RICHES — OR JUST A COMPETENCE?
By DAVID WALES THERE is living in a middle size town in Ohio a man who in his community is reputed to be a success. He is shrewd, resourceful, yet conservative. He never has been known to risk a penny unless he was certain to get that penny back, plus a half-mill as interest. Some who have met both this man and John D. Rockefeller aver that the two resemble each other markedly in appearance, and somewhat in manner. Each has the same sphinx-like smile, the same calculating eye, the same fondness for economy. Here, however, the resemblance ceases.
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Raising a Switchboard One Floor without Stopping the Telephone Service
The novel expedient of raising a main switchboard from the first to the second floor of the telephone exchange at West Palm Beach, Florida, was accomplished recently without at all interfering with the telephone service. The telephone company had added a floor to the building and then decided to get the switchboard up on it in such a way that the change would not embarrass the subscribers.
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Nuxated Iron Makes Strong, Vigorous, Iron Men and Beautiful, Healthy, Rosy Cheeked Women
Dr. Howard James, late of the Manhattan State Hospital of New York and formerly Assistant Physician Brooklyn State Hospital, says: "Iron is absolutely necessary to enable your blood to change food into living tissue. Without it, no matter how much or what you eat, your food merely passes through you without doing you any good.
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GUARDING AGAINST "SUPER-ENTHUSIASTS"
One of the Armed Police Boats These gasoline police launches, carrying machine guns and trained operators, now are scurrying back and forth in the waters of New York Harbor. Over one hundred veterans of the Spanish-American war-members of the force—are detailed to this duty, which is guarding the wharves and shipping against a repetition of the disastrous explosions and fires of the past few months.
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OUR FORTS ON WHEELS
By RENE BACHE TAKE an ordinary touring car. Sheathe it with armor-plate. Build a citadel on top of it, with a revolving turret and a machine-gun inside. You have then a fort on wheels. This is an idea on which the War Department has been working for some time past. We soon shall have whole squadrons of such armored cars. Doubtless we shall send them in numbers to the fighting line in France. It costs $2,000 for the alterations. The vehicle, when used for war purposes, is expected to have a speed of from forty to fifty miles an hour.
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