Previous Issue:

Sep, 1955
Next Issue:

Nov, 1955
MERCEDES-BENZ AIR BRAKE
MERCEDES-BENZ AIR BRAKE IN this year’s 24-hour Grand Prix at Le Mans, France, the West German Mercedes-Benz racing team demonstrated a sensational new braking device which, operating like an airplane’s landing flaps, helped slow the cars down from 150 mph to safe cornering speeds in a matter of seconds. The gadget, subject of much stormy […]
.
INVENTIONS WANTED!
INVENTIONS WANTED! LUMINOUS SIGN in railroad cars to announce approaching stations, eliminate mumbled calls. T. C. Alexander, Urbana. Ill. GLOWING balls, racquets, nets, boundary lines so tennis lovers could romp in summer twilight. Bill Dong, Vancouver, Canada. REPLACEABLE BLOTTER that fits in fountain pen cap and is ever-ready to absorb those blobs of ink. David […]
.
GUN TRADERS' SUPERMARKET
You can get anything from a blunderbuss to a burp gun at this busy swap session. ANY exhibition of guns, old or new, has a fascination for men of all sorts, from serious shooters and collectors to Walter Mittys who have never fondled anything more lethal than a cap pistol.
.
They Grub for a Living
A few wheat beetles in a sack of chicken feed grew into a booming bait business. By Shep Shepherd BUGS can be big business. Just ask Marlyn A. Palmer and Ray Wiseman; they're up to here in them—80 million of them every year. Palmer and Wiseman raise golden grubs and sell them to fishermen throughout the United States, Mexico and Canada, shipping as many as a quarter-million grubs a day in busy seasons. The golden grub is the larva of the black wheat beetle. It hatches from an egg, remains a grub for a short time, then goes into the pupa stage from which it gradually changes into a mature beetle. The complete transformation takes about six months. It is the larva, or grub, that drives fish frantic and sends anglers flocking to the bait shops.
.
WORLD'S LARGEST WHIRLYBIRD
WORLD’S LARGEST WHIRLYBIRD THE world’s largest transport helicopter and America’s first twin-engined tandem whirlybird transport is the Piasecki YH-16. An important feature of its tandem design is that cargo can be loaded quickly without too much regard for weight balance. The craft’s rotors are connected by a shaft to permit single engine operation and its […]
.
Snowshoes, Jelly Beans and Rat Bait Cheese
Snowshoes, Jelly Beans and Rat Bait Cheese YOU can buy anything from a buggy whip to a bustle at the Old Country Store, South Sudbury, Mass. Wilfred Allen, originator and proprietor of the old-time emporium, has it packed to the rafters with relics that would have made your great great grandpa do a jig of […]
.
CAR WITH PROP
CAR WITH PROP Unique Argentine Aerocar can do 100 mph and is being considered for mass production in the U.S. THIS peppy-looking buggy with the unorthodox propeller on its tail is the new Argentine Aerocar powered by a 90-brake horsepower Chevy engine and with a top speed of about 100 mph. Designers and builders Eugenio […]
.
IT'S NEW!
FAMILY BIKE. Mrs. Donald Goodrum, young Miami matron, and the bike she remodeled for trips around town with her children. SILENT SURVIVOR of atomic blast face paint blistered* tie scorched but otherwise OK, was 7,000 feet from center of explosion. EXPRESS ELEVATOR for people caught in tall firetraps was recently shown in Karlsruhe, Germany. It rises 160 feet in 60 seconds.
.
Two-for-One Camera
Two-for-One Camera TELEVISION’S fascinating forward march resulted in another development recently when Du Mont Laboratories, Inc., Clifton, N. J., announced the Electronicam, an amazing new two-for-one camera which enables standard black-and-white TV programs to be broadcast while a high-quality film of the same program is simultaneously recorded in black-and-white or color. The system will adapt […]
.
CAN WE CRASH THE DEADLY FLAME BARRIER?
Fly a plane fast enough and friction will melt it. Can we "put out the fire?" By David W. Barclay ENGINEERS, who sometimes get pretty irritated when writers dream up catch phrases for their scientific findings, are not exactly happy with the term Flame Barrier or Heat Barrier which has been applied to hypersonic flight. (A barrier, say the engineers, is something you can climb over, sneak around or bull your way through. None of these work when an air-breathing, wing-lifted vehicle is trying to go faster and faster in the envelope of air which surrounds the earth.) But regardless of what you call it, the obstacle—air friction—is there and gets worse with each extra mile per hour of speed. Eventually you wind up as a glowing ember, blob of molten metal, or a cloud of superheated dust.
.
Eye-Stoppers
QUAFFER EXTRAORDINARY is Auguste Maffrey, French beer-drinking champ, who slurps up about 12 quarts of suds in 52 minutes from king-sized vat. Any challengers? GRIZZLY-BEAR chair presented to President Andrew Johnson in 1865 won't take a chunk from your hide when you sit down, but only a man with steady nerves can relax in it TIBETAN GHOST TRAP imprisons visitors from space, it says here. Trap at rear is for demons who bring illness.
.
TWO-WHEEL ANTIQUES
These snappy bikes were displayed by the Antique Motorcycle Club at their recent convention in Fishkill, N. Y. 1911 Triumph with two speeds, belt drive and gas lamp belongs to Triumph Corp. of Baltimore. Henry Wing, Jr., with his 1928 Douglas TT. a formidable English racer of the period.
.
America's Flying Salesmen
They're opening new sales territories, doubling their business and flying more miles than the scheduled airlines. By John L. Scherer COWBOY singing star Gene Autry spends more time in the cockpit of his Beechcraft Model 18 than he does in the saddle. Autry is a skilled flier with an Air Transport Pilot rating. A typical business trip will find him flying to 32 cities in 32 days, covering more than 4,200 miles. "It would be impossible for me to. maintain such a tight schedule without my own plane. You just can't make commercial airline connections that way," says Gene. Besides skipping the schedules and connections problem, Autry has had only two field delays in as many years—both due to weather rather than maintenance trouble.
.
How Automation Will Affect Your Job
New skills, a shorter work week and more leisure time will be yours in 1975—thanks to machines with "brains"! By Robert Bendiner THE YEAR is 1975. For a man of 50 leaving a factory gate at five in the afternoon, you look remarkably fresh. Your light, comfortable-looking summer suit is pressed and spotless, your face and hands are free of grime, and your features show no sign of the strain that men once associated with the heat and noise of a big factory. There is an extra spring in your step as you walk toward the heliport, perhaps because this is Thursday. Your four-day work week is over, and ahead of you are three full days to call your own. Are you a pampered relative of the owner, or perhaps the owner himself? Not at all. You are an ordinary factory hand—in charge of "preventive tool maintenance" for your section. You have been with the Peerless Auto Parts Company for 25 years, one of the lucky ones who were trained by management for the great changeover to automation that occurred in the mid-'60s.
.
NEW DOUBLE FEATURE - FISH AND FILMS!
NEW DOUBLE FEATURE – FISH AND FILMS! James Beach never dreamed his customers would take home fish caught while watching his drive-in movie. WHEN James Beach built his drive-in theatre on a lakeside at Winter Haven, Fla., he never thought that fish might be lurking in the waters offshore. But customers began lugging their fishing […]
.
I WAS A SLAVE-SCIENTIST IN RUSSIA PART TWO
PART TWO Suicide or Siberia seemed the only ways out for the "captive brains" in the secret research camp. By Dr. Otto Maar ART BY GURNEY MILLER (Note: In the first part of this report (September MI) by a German scientist imprisoned in Russia and forced to do research for the Reds, Dr. Maar tells how he was arrested in the East Zone of Germany and sentenced to 25 years imprisonment for "espionage" and "anti- Soviet propaganda." With other German scientists and technicians he makes a long, harrowing journey to the Russian prison camp at Kutschino, in the environs of Moscow. Here he works on "border protection devices" for the Reds and learn first-hand of their slip- shod production methods and the ignorance of some of their scientists. Conditions at Kutschino are relatively mild. But over the prisoners hangs the threat of Workuta—a dreaded prison camp in Siberia. Now continue Dr. Maar's remarkable story . . .)
.