Previous Issue:

Oct, 1949
Next Issue:

Jan, 1950
Workbench Award Winners...
THE winner—all of 'em! The six projects shown on these pages were the best Workbench Award entries received during the month. A five dollar check and a Workbench Award Certificate is being mailed to each winner for his prize project. If you are a workshop fan then why not let us know what you're doing? Send us a picture plus a letter describing your project and if your entry is one of the monthly winners you'll receive our check and Workbench Award Certificate, which incidentally, is suitable for framing. If your entry is not one of the published winners you still may win our handsome Certificate of Merit.
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First-Aid Booth
First-Aid Booth THE Germans have designed a street first-aid booth which seems to have everything. Well, practically everything. First, naturally, there’s a first-aid kit and a folding stretcher on wheels. This is so light it can be pushed by a child. Then, there’s a public telephone and a fire alarm. For the policeman on beat, […]
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NEW on the ROAD
Cycle Rickshaw is a novelty motorcycle cab which is becoming popular in Germany. Its main virtue is economy—it can make 60 miles on one gallon of gas. Top speed is 31 mph. It was recently exhibited at the Hanover (Germany) Trade Fair and will probably cost $700 when it hits the American markets.
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MI Tests the 1950 Studebaker
"One of the best dollar values today," says Tom McCahill. They're not the fastest cars on the road but they're tops in comfort and quality. THE new, needle-nose Studebaker gives the boys of the Big Three something to shoot at. Back in '46, with the introduction of the 1947 Studebaker designed by Raymond Loewy, this first real post-war auto stirred up the populace. And now, once again, Loewy has set the pace with the 1950 Studebaker.
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Calling All Inventors
Got a new gadget? Rochester's industries want to see it. They may even make it and market it for you. By Alfred Eris THERE'S a man in Rochester, N. Y., whose job it is to help you make a million dollars! His name is Harold S. Rand and he's the Deputy Commissioner of Commerce for that city. What's the catch? Naturally, there's a reason for it—but it's certainly not a hidden reason. It's simply part of a scheme to keep Rochester's industries going at capacity.
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the music goes 'round and 'round
People who like phonograph music are getting dizzy trying to keep up with three different systems of playing three sizes of disks. By Robert Hertzberg BUYING phonograph records used to be a simple and painless operation. You could walk into any music shop and say, "I want a few of the latest dance tunes for a party." You'd depart in a few minutes with a neat bundle under your arm. But not any more! "Phonograph records? Yes, sir," the clerk now says. "Would you like 10- or 12-inch records for a 78-r.p.m. turntable, or 7-, 10-, or 12-inch records for a 33-1/3 r.p.m. machine, or 7-inch records for a 45-r.p.m. player? The prices range from 60 cents to $4.85."
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Tunnel-Hull Boat Won't Roll
GAR Wood, the silver-haired king of speedboat racing, has designed the most stable boat in the world. The no-roll Venturi is 188 feet long and 40 feet wide, and has twin hulls which slice through the waves instead of climbing over them as do conventional craft. Propellers are 4-1/2 feet in diameter and extend below the hull, increasing draft at the stern to about 8 feet when underway.
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Giant Chronograph
Giant Chronograph watch was built at the Western Pennsylvania Horological Institute to teach students how to repair this type of timepiece. It’s 23 inches in diameter and the entire movement weighs about 60 pounds. The difference between this model and its tiny counterpart is that the big watch has its transparent face on the back.
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Jet Pilots Fly in Bed
THE United States Air Force is putting its flyers to bed so that they can't go to sleep! If that seems sort of cryptic to you, be assured that it should. For it's only a complicated way of saying that a prone position bed for pilots to reduce the possibility of blackouts and ease the strain of sitting has been developed at the Aero-Medical Laboratory of the - Air Materiel Command in Dayton, Ohio. Gravitational pull and flying fatigue are the pilots' worst enemies.
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Manhattan Game Warden
Manhattan Game Warden THE towering jungle of Manhattan’s skyscrapers is the last place in the world you’d look for a game warden. But for ten years now George Stamir has been prowling the Big City’s concrete canyons as a N. Y. State Game Protector. In a strictly noncamping business suit, Stamir patrols the streets from […]
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Fish-Net Shirt
Fish-Net Shirt is a satisfactory substitute for the Eskimo caribou garments in the Arctic. It allows body perspiration to evaporate and form a vapor barrier, thus conserving all possible natural heat needed in frigid climates. First used in the Canadian Arctic by Operation Musk-Ox, this hole-some shirt is now worn under army winter underwear.
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Electric Hand
Electric Hand is made of a lightweight metal, driven by a tiny motor installed in the wrist. The electric engine operates off a six-volt battery. A button attached to the user’s upper arm allows the motor to be switched on or off merely by pressure against the body. Device was developed by Friesecke & Hoepfner […]
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Bronzing Baby's Shoes
How to transform your baby's first pair of walkers into a permanent keepsake. By Ken Murray IT is said that the electroplating of baby shoes was conceived when a Scotchman saw a suit of armor during a visit to his ancestral home. Nowadays the "metalizing" of baby's first shoes is reaching an astonishing popularity, based mostly on the permanence given such articles when they are protected against time with a coating of metal. Copper is the metal most commonly used, and it is enduring enough in itself, but for further protection and attractiveness the encasement of copper may be plated over with gold, silver or nickel. The electroplated shoes are stiff and rigid and may be displayed mounted or unmounted as permanent keepsakes.
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Spuriscope
So, why couldn’t the counterfeiter buy one of these? Spuriscope tells the difference between a counterfeit bill and a genuine piece of money. The user dials the serial number which is on the currency and there appears on the machine an alphabetical series designation. If the bill in question does not bear the same letters, […]
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