Previous Issue:

Oct, 1954
Next Issue:

Jun, 1955
MI-stoppers
Don't give us any of your lip! A giraffe at Rome. Italy, zoo stretches its neck and sticks out its tongue to reach for a tasty piece of cake. Corset-like, ventilated cooling suit made in England keeps jet pilots cool when they By at supersonic speeds or in a torrid climate.
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BURGESS Flashlight BATTERIES
Remember, the Tommy gun and dynamite will do you no good if the old wizard catches you in his Burgess beam. BURGESS Flashlight BATTERIES “CURSES, ANUDDER GUY , WIT’ BURGESS BATTERIES!!!” A QUALITY DRY BATTERY FOR EVERY PURPOSE SEALED IN STEEL AND PLASTIC. Ask for them at your favorite store.
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TOM McCAHILL SAYS: "We Can Stop the Highway Slaughter!"
MI's famed automotive authority proposes a gutsy, double-barreled safety program which would make a lot of people mad—but also save a lot of lives. SPEED, illegal speed, is the Number One cause of highway deaths, according to the majority of the high-tinkling brass in the safety business. To this I say, "Phooey." Speed is a cause of highway deaths—but then, so is slow-driving. As I see it, there are four primary causes of our annual roadway slaughter: obsolete highways, Stone Age police practices, bad drivers and unsafe automobiles.
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HAVE THEY FOUND THE LOST CONTINENT?
HAVE THEY FOUND THE LOST CONTINENT? A noted German archaeologist believes he has uncovered the grave of the fabulous city that sank beneath the sea. By Robert Martin A TENSE drama was being enacted in the North Sea. A deep-sea diver was exploring the ocean’s floor as a scholarly looking man stood by the rail […]
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BIG FIRMS WILL PUT YOU IN BUSINESS
Opportunities are unlimited for those willing to take the plunge. By Lester David WHEN young Louis Potomac said goodbye to the Navy in 1945 and headed for his native California, he and his wife set up housekeeping in a reconverted chicken coop. That's how short of folding money was ex-sailor Potomac. But within a short time, he latched onto an idea which ultimately provided him with two big homes, two big Cadillacs and one great, big bank balance.
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INVENTIONS WANTED!
GARDEN WHEELBARROW BRAKE prevents loaded vehicle from running away with load and loader on a downgrade. Fine for parking. K. Weirich. Hart, Mich. HOME PLATE CLAMP keeps party-goers' hands free for feeding, holds potato salad in reaching distance. A "good deal" for free-loaders. Ruth Essick, Chicago.
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COPS MAKE FACES IN LOS ANGELES
Victims are putting the finger on criminals with the aid of a new machine that builds-a-face. By Louis Hochman IT was a dark, lonely night and the attractive young Los Angeles woman walking down the street had no way of knowing that the man who had befriended her and was walking beside her was a dangerous sex criminal. For three blocks they walked and talked—suddenly the man turned on the girl, beat her mercilessly with his fists and shot her through the head.
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NEW for the HOME
SPIN-CLEAN is a device for cleaning Venetian blinds without taking them down. The jaws of the alligator-like nozzle electrically brush each slat of the blinds clean. Pionair Prods., Inc.. Chic. NUMBERLITE provides address plate easily seen at night. Electric light silhouettes the numbers. Want folks to remember your address? This is one way to do it Numberlite. East Hart., Conn.
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NEW in SCIENCE
Two Dutch girls inject preservative chemicals into flowers in a Dusseldorf, Germany, flower shop. Chemicals keep flowers fresh for months. These sight and hearing glasses, available in various colors and shapes, have a built-in hearing aid complete with batteries and microphone.
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New Optical Radioactivity Detector - GEIGER SCOPE
Now you can check minerals for uranium with this amazingly sensitive, inexpensive device. For prospectors, engineers, experimenters, gadgeteers, everyone interested in atomic energy. Now being used in atomic energy laboratories and major universities. Indicates radioactive content with sparkles of light. Sturdy, durable, portable as a pocket watch; needs no power source.
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Fat Herman's Chariot
WHEN Corporal Richard Dutot of New Hyde Park. L. I., was stationed in Germany, he was bitten by the car bug after riding in a German friend's Mercedes-Benz—one of four cars that was made especially for former Nazi Air Marshal, Herman Goering.
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OIL FIELD IN HIS GARAGE
Fred Perry, Pittsburgh. Pa., hobbyist, has spent years making this working model of an early 1900 Pennsylvania oil field which stands on a platform in his garage. Miniature powerhouse supplies jack pumps with power to bring oil from wells to nearby tanks. Pipelines then carry it to the storage tanks. Here Perry tightens bolt on tiny jack pump with one of the special tools he had to make himself in order to assemble and maintain his oil field.
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learn to be a QUICK THINKER
Ability to think fast really counts when a sudden emergency develops—in any situation from train wreck to trapped tot. By Harry Kursh THE train loaded with passengers from Boston had had an uneventful trip—until it began its approach to the terminal tracks of famous Union Station in Washington, D. C. Then a strange thing happened. Instead of gradually slowing down for a stop, the train, swaying violently, began to pick up speed. Passengers glanced around, puzzled. What was going on? They didn't have much time to wonder. Four minutes later the runaway train hit the crowded station concourse like a cyclonic piledriver, ripping through brick and steel barriers.
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HE FOUND A WAY... Meyer Rhein's Toothbrush
By Alfred Lief TOOTHPICKS, not toothbrushes, were the common means of dental care when Meyer L. Rhein graduated from Union University in 1880 with a degree in medicine. He was strongly interested in oral hygiene. After spending another year at a college of dentistry, he opened an office in New York as a dentist. Convinced that cavities between teeth and in back teeth could be avoided by proper cleansing, Dr. Rhein decided to remedy matters.
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THE TELE-PAL
WATCHING TV was Benjamin Frankenstein's way of relaxing each evening after a busy day at his Tele-Matic Industries, Inc., 16 Howard Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. But Ben had a problem. He and his wife were still living in the same two-room apartment they had secured when first married. Now, with two youngsters and a TV set in their bedroom, it was impossible for them to watch their favorite programs without disturbing the babies in the cribs.
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Chopper Checkup At the Zoo
DESPITE the wonderful pain-killing techniques developed recently in the field of dentistry, most people are still frightened to death by the very thought of having their teeth checked. One dentist, however, who is usually more wary of his patients than they are of him is Dr. C. P. Gandal of New York's Bronx Zoo.
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MI Tests the Morris Minor Station Wagon
Although it has the smallest engine of any production car built in England, this cute bucket corners like a baby Ferrari, says Tom. By Tom McCahill ON seeing a Morris Minor going down the road, an Irish friend of mine once said to me, "If any one ever hit me with one of them things and I found it out, I'd turn both the roller skate and the driver over me knee."
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Drug Store for Sick Pooches
Doctor Tarr's business went to the dogs in its first year and he grossed $30,000 with it. "HOW to get rich?" is an ever recurring XI question, and one reasonable answer, contributed by Henry Kaiser, the famous industrialist and speed king of ship builders, is: "Render a needed new service."
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Inside A Parking Meter
Inside A Parking Meter PARKING meters are singing a $$ tune these days as more and more communities resort to this method of eliminating traffic congestion—and filling the city treasury. Each meter has two doors—one for the mechanism, which is opened by the repair company, and the other to the money, this one being opened […]
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Why Don't We Build - FLYING RAM FIGHTERS!
If atomic attack comes, our best defense may be rammer planes that give the pilot a chance to survive. By Martin Caidin LET'S face it—the complete air defense of the United States is an impossibility. Even with all-weather jet fighters armed with machine guns, rockets, and guided missiles; with rocket fighters; with unpiloted robot fighters; with supersonic rocket guided missiles; with radar picket ships and picket planes; with ground observers and a far-flung communications system, we can't prevent a certain number of enemy atomic and hydrogen bombs from hitting our cities.
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FASHIONS for the ATOMIC AGE
Hermaticaily sealed plastic suits developed by General Electric for men who work in their atomic plants, protect them against deadly effects of radiation in contaminated areas. Man crawls through tunnel which is connected to tail of suit and serves as an entrance and exit Tunnel also brings in clean air from the outside.
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CAVE CURE For Asthma Victims
CAVE CURE For Asthma Victims NEAR the town of Ennepetal in Westphalia, Germany, is the Klutert cave which has become a mecca for asthma sufferers who find a short stay in the cave rids them of coughing spasms. Doctors investigating the phenomenon say that the humid air in the cave is almost entirely free of […]
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MI GOLDEN HAMMER AWARD WINNERS
Grandfather clock features a moving moon dial and chimes. Constructed in spare time by postal clerk, Melvin E. Johnson, Baltimore. Photo sent by Mrs. Johnson. Bookcase-wall cabinet piece is made of attractive knotty pine finished with orange shellac. Samuel Robertino, Stamford, Conn.
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ATOMIC ART
By Gene Bylinsky WHILE trying to "tag" microscopic fungi with the use of radioactive isotopes in 1951 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Dr. Harry Wheeler, Associate Professor of Botany at Louisiana State University, discovered that when the tiny fungi were given radioactive food and placed upon photographic paper they would take pictures of themselves. Working with his wife Naomi and Mrs. Caroline Durieux, under whom his wife was studying print-making methods, they tried using isotopes for prints—with great success.
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Bronx Bronco-Buster
Hopalong Abramowitz has been doing business at the same old stable for the past 50 years. Now he's the last of the horse-breeders left in the Bronx. A half-century ago, when New York City's now-teeming Bronx was one big cow pasture, a young horse-fancier named Harry Abramowitz arrived from Minsk, Russia, with yearnings to raise bangtails in his adopted land. Today, Harry—now known as Hopalong Abramowitz—is still breeding horses right in the heart of a Bronx that has become one of the world's most heavily-populated boroughs.
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