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Oct, 1956
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Dec, 1956
GROWING PAINS OF A PLANE
It took 11 years to get the new Colonial Skimmer Amphibian off the drawing boards into the sky. IT TAKES more than a pair of wings to get a plane off the ground and the new Colonial Skimmer Amphibian is a perfect example of the complications that plague designers from the initial plans until the ship takes to the air. Back in 1945 David Thurston, a young aeronautical engineer, put down on paper his idea for a small, two-place amphibian. The first step was to design a ship capable of operation from both land and water yet have the plans conform to CAA regulations.
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He Makes Fish Out of People
Ed Townsend's how-to skin diving school teaches aquatic enthusiasts to explore the briny deep safely. By Sam Schneider EARLY in the fall of 1953 two men set off on a skin diving prowl of the coral reefs in the ocean of Hillsborough, a tiny community on the southeast coast of Florida. The younger of the pair, wearing a brand new "lung" he'd recently bought, dropped off their boat and never surfaced alive. The tragedy made headlines in south Florida, a climatically natural stronghold of the increasingly popular aquatic activity. It also spurred 260-pound Edwin D. Townsend into the development of a unique business.
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MI PIN-UP CAR: 1900 WHITE STANHOPE STEAMER
MI PIN-UP CAR: 1900 WHITE STANHOPE STEAMER Owner: Jerry Foley, Jacksonville, Fla. Engine: 2-cylinder double-acting steam engine, 6 brake horsepower. Wheelbase: 66 in. Weight: 1,100 lbs. Top speed: approximately 60 mph. Said to be oldest White Steamer in the U. S. Original cost was $1,000.
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STRIKE IT RICH IN AFRICA
Cast a glance at the Bright Continent—"incomparably the best source of potential wealth waiting development in the world." By Lester David THE YOUNG man knelt on the dry ground of the Bomi Hills in Liberia, a look of intense concentration on his tanned face. Then he rose and slowly made his way back to headquarters, deep in his own thoughts.
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HOW DOES IT WORK? - Oil Lamp Fan
Stirling cycle fans have quite the following. HOW DOES IT WORK? EARL CROSS doesn’t know what makes his antique rotary fan work—but why argue with a cooling breeze? In the base of tlie fan is an oil lamp which heats a cylinder containing two pistons. Light the lamp and the blades slowly pick up speed. […]
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IT'S NEW!
HIGH GRADE GRAVEL, freshly hand-sifted from Colombian emerald mine. Gems will bring as much as $11,500,000 per pound. REAL COOL, say Transit Authority men Joseph O'Grady and Charles Patterson as they dig New York subway air-conditioning. PERFECT IRON CRYSTAL with tensile strength of 1,900,000 pounds per sq. in. has been grown in General Electric lab.
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ON THE HOT SEAT
That really depends on what part of the sun they are talking about ON THE HOT SEAT SEATED on a fiery wicker chair in the 1200°F heat in the furnace of Seaporcel Metals, Inc. plant at Long Island City, N. Y., ceramic engineer D. J. Bennett wears new aluminum-coated fireproof suit. Makers claim suit will […]
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TOMORROW'S KITCHENS TODAY
Left: This layout, planned by Youngstown Kitchens, makes most of available space, gives the homemaker all the conveniences she could want. Note the variety of steel cabinets, waist-high oven built into wall. Right: Westinghouse "Cinnamon" kitchen is designed for large family. For $7.50, the company will supply blueprints from which a contractor can duplicate it. Prints for 3 other kitchens are available at $6 each.
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He'll Buy Your Inventions
If you have an idea for a new invention John Rockett's Product Development Corp. would like to hear from you. By John N. Makris GOT an idea for an invention you believe is new, practical and useful? Then John F. Rockett, Jr., president of the Product Development Corp. of Boston would like to hear from you. Rockett, whose newly established firm brings together the man with an idea and the company with the plant and capital to develop the idea, estimates there are 20,000,000 would-be inventors in the United States, representing an enormous treasury of new products, gadgets and services.
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French Midget Jet
French Midget Jet The little Minijet zips along at 250 mph and may become the big liaison plane of tomorrow. THE tiny jet aircraft shown above is no mere novelty, though it is undoubtedly one of the smallest jets yet built. In recent aerobatic competitions in England it placed second against a number of British, […]
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Pocket Ashtray-Lighter
A GUARANTEED conversation-starter wherever you go is this unusual German-made Simpson cigarette lighter which copped top honors for this month's Bright Idea. A pocket ashtray and lighter, this smoker's accessory is no larger than an ordinary lighter. A flick of the thumb at light-up time and the flame is ignited.
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INVENTIONS WANTED!
NONSKID EGG-BEATER equipped with a suction cup to grip the bottom of the mixing bowl. Philip Kochman. Lawrence. Mass. FOR HOME PASTRYCOOKS, a spray can for greasing pie pans without greasing fingers. Mrs. James Traucht. Jenera, O. TELESCOPING TELEPHONE POLES to make the lineman's work easier and at the same time safer. Peter Kopach, Ramsey, N. J.
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