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Nov, 1955
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Jan, 1956
King of the Dummies
To Frank Marshall the famous McCarthy is only one of a family of hundreds of brash wooden midgets he has carved in the past 40 years.
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Sand-Blast Artist
Sand-Blast Artist A student of Old World glassmaking and sculpture creates his own new medium. THE use of sculpture and glass in religious art is an old story, but Duncan Niles Terry has combined these elements to produce beautiful sculptured glass that graces a number of churches and religious institutions. Glass has interested Terry since […]
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Swords for the Atomic Age
Every headline sounds better if you stick the word “Atomic” in it. Even if you’re talking about a centuries old technique for making swords. Swords for the Atomic Age Wilkinson blades gleamed at Waterloo and Balaclava and are still being made for military ceremonies. IF YOU need a sword the place to get it is […]
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They Chisel Plastic
They Chisel Plastic Modern sculptors can carve light and shadow into their work with a thrilling new man-made material. LOT’S wife was turned into a pillar of salt in the Bible but British sculptor Arthur Fleischmann has chipped her out of the biggest block of Perspex ever made. Perspex is a British plastic similar to […]
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MODELS FOR MILLIONS
It takes superb skill and endless work to produce those plastic scale model kits anyone can assemble. LEWIS H. GLASER, founder and president of Revell, Inc., the plastic model kit company, has on file a letter received from the Department of the Navy in Washington. "The Revell ship models I have seen all possess a sailor's concern for nautical detail as well as an engineer's attention to workmanship and design," the letter states.
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BUILD THIS MODEL OF THE LINCOLN FUTURA
This superb scale model boasts front and rear lights, "turn" indicators, and electric drive. By Paul Palanek THE most revolutionary and advanced vehicle ever to be driven on public highways was given its world driving premier early this year. Benson Ford, vice-president of Ford, who drove the sleek low-slung twin Plexiglas dome Lincoln Futura for the first time on a public thoroughfare called it, "a $250,000 laboratory on wheels." Almost 19 ft. long, 7 ft. wide and only 53 in. high the Futura has a low silhouette and smooth flowing lines almost devoid of exterior ornamentation. Its all-steel body is a beautiful pearlescent, frost-blue white.
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THE '56 DODGE
Featuring a unique pushbutton transmission, the new Dodge will be hard to beat in the medium-priced field, reports Uncle Thomas. By Tom McCahill THE fan-out of the rear fender line is the big styling change for the 1956 Dodge. Oddly enough, this looks much better in person than in photographs. The hood has been drooped slightly at the nose, a new ornament has been slapped on, and under the hood there is a much larger ram than for '55.
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IT'S NEW!
SHOOTING at Big Four, German photographer wields his four-foot camera, longest one used at "Summit" conference in Switzerland. TRACTOR CADDIE designed by English golfing engineer, Henry Cotton, has engine to make light chore of hefting clubs on links. STERN WHEELER Mary R churns up spray on maiden trip up Chicago river. Vacationer's dreamboat was constructed by Thomas Burke. Sr.. and family. Craft houses them all.
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Is Your Mascot Missing?
The passion for authenticity among classic car owners means money in the bank to Clairmonte. Don Clairmonte of New York City's Greenwich Village is a one-time car salesman who turned sculptor. One of his specialties is restoring, reproducing and creating mascots to ride up front on rejuvenated classics and custom jobs. His copies are chrome or nickel-plated bronze castings, and there's no way of telling them from the real McCoy.
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Hurdy-Gurdy
Cranking the Swiss music movement within this box makes the little begging monkey go into his dance. By Elma Waltner THE street organ grinder is a rare sight these days and it's likely that most youngsters have never seen one. However, this little hurdy-gurdy, with its dancing monkey begging for pennies as the small owner grinds out a tune, will prove a popular toy.
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CLATTER GUN
There's fun galore in store for the boy who has this realistic sounding Thompson machine gun. By Orlando Guerra AT practically no cost and in a very small amount of time you can convert a mailing tube into a marvelously noisy clatter gun. Most kids will love it. A three-inch-diameter tube is best for the purpose, and it should be cut to a 14-in. length. The gun stock is cut from one-inch pine according to the pattern shown, then the tube is glued and screwed to it.
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INVENTIONS WANTED!
We have disposable garbage can liners. Why not go the whole hog with disposable paper cans? B. Kentile, Saranac Lake. N. Y. Why not self-winding spools that would play out only as much telephone cord as you need? Lydie Ascheim, New York, N. Y.
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Ancient War Machines
Replicas of some of the ancient engines of war make fascinating and educational model projects. ALTHOUGH the advent of the jet plane, atomic gun and submarine has changed the aspect of warfare so considerably that it could hardly be recognized by anyone living a hundred years ago, primitive and ancient war machines still continue to fire the imagination of boys of all ages. Authentic replicas of some of the major weapons of the ancients make fascinating model projects, and with this in mind, MI asked model maker Eugene Thomas to specially build a set of these models and draw up easy-to-follow plans.
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