Previous Issue:

Jan, 1947
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Mar, 1947
Homemade Amphib
Homemade Amphib below can be pedalled across water at five knots and overland at a steady 18-mph, claims the man who built it, Norman Skyes of Cheshire, England. It is made mostly of wood, has three wheels and can be mass-produced cheaply, he says.
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Trapper a la car
These professional trappers of predatory animals cover their trap-lines via automobiles. TO MANY, the name "trapper" conjures up a picture of a romantic figure, clad in a heavy mackinaw and fur cap, living in an isolated cabin near Hudson Bay, tramping over miles of trap-line on snowshoes, and making only rare trips to civilization by means of his dog sledge. This is Jack London's or James Oliver Cur-wood's trapper.
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Confessions of a Hot-Rod Jockey
By Earl Bruce - Amateur Champion If you're smart, careful and a mighty good mechanic you too can "soup-up" an automobile and become a "screaming" hot-rodder DRIVING a "hot rod" or "souped-up" car is a sport—cleanly competitive, law-abiding, and as reasonably safe as airplane, bike, or midget auto racing, boxing, football, or any other spine-tingling spectacle that thrills Americans in the country's arenas today. That's my story and I'll stick to it.
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Scientists Raid the Ocean Floor
Explorers now aim at the conquest of the sea floor, a great dim world of incredible riches. A LOUD blare of confused noises breaks in upon the botanist's thoughts, distracting his attention from the bizarre plant he has been studying intently in the dimness of the sea bottom. He sighs, and a thicker-than-usual flock of bubbles burbles up from the artificial "gills" which enable him to breathe his oxygen directly from the water.
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design for living in miniature
BY RON ROMERO Planning a new house? Town? School? Try it out first with made-to-scale plastic blocks! THE building boom is on! Skyscrapers, air terminals, houses, churches—they're sprouting like mushrooms. Each one is made entirely of plastic and is complete to the last detail in one hour. You can put up a whole city in an evening. Your living room rug will make an excellent site.
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Tiny "Tellies"
Tiny “Tellies” were the centers of attraction at recent television shows on both sides of the Atlantic. The table model at right, below, was displayed at an exhibition in the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City. The set is encased in Lucite to permit an interior view. The receiver below was featured at a […]
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Eyeball Glasses
Eventually nearly everyone mill wear their glasses on their eyeball. ONE of the lesser miracles of science is the contact lens, that invisible eyeglass that fits right on the eyeball to correct imperfect vision. Now science improves on its miracle and makes the lens out of plastic, eliminating glass and its breakage and giving new lightness and improvement in appearance.
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cigarette-case camera
by Max Spitalny YOU'VE said a hundred times, "Oh if I only had a camera with me!" Raymond La Rose, veteran Hollywood cameraman and incurable inventor, said it too. He said it often. He said it so often he got tired of saying it: he got busy. He ended by turning out a snapshot camera hardly larger than a cigarette case—so small one can carry it ready but unnoticed in the pocket at all times, and so well designed that it takes excellent pictures.
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Color Television Comes True
All-electronic color television has been achieved— no rotating disks, no flicker. You'll be seeing it! BY GOLD V. SANDERS THE magic of the electron tube has been tapped again by modern Aladdins at RCA laboratories, and out comes television in color. It is all-electronic color, for the first time; no mechanical whirling gadgets to "mix" the colors. The studio scene is broken up into the three primary colors of light, red, blue and green. The signal—which means the picture—is transmitted through the air in three separate channels. At the receiving end the three incoming pictures are thrown simultaneously on a screen, producing full color again.
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Night Into Day
With the activation of gases in the Ionosphere, we'll have eternal day. BY JOHN C. ADLER A NEW radiance may soon pour-down from the night sky, dispelling the darkness and changing the life of mankind in the future. This light, the brilliant glow of activated gases in the Ionosphere, is now a definite scientific possibility. Professor Etienne Vassy, Maitre de Conference of the Faculty of Sciences, Sorbonne University, Paris, has set imaginations soaring with his new theory. He proposes to shoot a power ray 50 miles into the air, up into the thin gases of the Ionosphere, activating these gases and causing them to glow with a neon-like light. An artist's conception of this effect upon the business section of New York City is shown in the accompanying photograph. In this island of light, people could work without artificial illumination.
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Vain Cricket used to Study Electricity
I’m racking my brain here, but I can’t figure out why you would need a cricket to study electricity… Vain Cricket left, holds a mirror in its “hand” as you can see if you look closely. The cricket is one-half inch high, but the mirror measures only .09 by .015 inches. It’s used to study […]
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This is the Supersonic Barrier
Extraordinary things happen close to the speed of sound. BY WILLY LEY FOR millenia man dreamed about flying—and did nothing about it. In 1783 the balloon was invented and people could fly wherever the wind happened to blow them. More than a century later the airplane was invented—and people began to be able to fly where they wanted to go. Now, forty-four years later, man wants to fly faster than sound. He will do it. Aeronautical science is close to this goal; it may take only a year or two. But there are difficulties, and most, of them are tied up with something which is called a Mach number. (The term honors the Austrian physicist Dr. E. Mach, who was one of the first to investigate the problems of air resistance at high speeds.)
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Paint with Your Fingers, Find Your Hidden Neurosis
You may not make masterpieces, but you'll paint a picture of your hidden neurosis. BY GOLD V. SANDERS BECAUSE a clever school teacher invented a novel way to instruct her small pupils, psychiatrists now have a valuable new implement for ferreting out emotional disturbances and laying bare the innermost personality of the mentally ill. Odd as it may seem, this important device is finger painting, the making of pictures by smearing paint on paper with fingers and hands. It was developed by Ruth Faison Shaw as a simple art form for children, but it turned out to be something far different and more potent.
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