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Mar, 1947
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May, 1947
Jivin' up the Jeep
FOLLOWING the publication of articles in the October and November 1946 issues of Mechanix Illustrated, readers in practically every state have sent in ideas for improving the comfort and utility of the versatile and popular Army jeep. Here are a few suggestions of general interest. We will publish others in forthcoming issues. If you have any useful hints or kinks, send them to Joe Jeep, c/o Mechanix Illustrated, 67 West 44th Street, New York 18, N. Y. Good snapshots are especially wanted. A payment of $5.00 each will be made for acceptable ideas.
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Two-way Pocket Radio
Two-way Pocket Radio made during the war by Tele-Radio, Ltd., for British secret service work will soon be on the market. -It has a range of one mile with the power-pack shown, but manufacturers say its power can easily be increased. The firm will offer manufacturing rights to interested parties in the United States and […]
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No Shrink- No Spot
A DISTANT cousin of the sulfa drugs, melamine, is being used to "cure" some of the serious "ailments" of textiles. Its most striking use is in a resin which, applied to woolens, solves the age-old problem of shrinking and matting in water.
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Trouble Busters
You toss them a tough problem and they toss back a tender solution. BY MARGOT PATTERSON "NO POTATOES," the grocer said grimly. "No potatoes?" the housewife exclaimed with emotion. "Why, I must have potatoes! My family needs potatoes!" "Sorry, lady," the grocer said. "There's a shortage. It's on account of the rot." Until 1938, this little scene was re-enacted annually all over the United States. Bacterial soft rot baffled shippers. It would spread through whole carloads of potatoes, causing losses of millions of dollars. Finally, the shippers put the problem in the hands of the Armour Research Foundation.
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Haywire House
By R.W.K I'VE been there, I've seen, I've taken pictures—but I still don't see how such things are possible. The Editors of MI heard some wild stories about a place called the House of Mystery. What stories! People go around ten degrees off the vertical! A golf ball thrown straight up comes down several inches to one side! A bottle rolls uphill! A broom stands by itself—at an angle to the floor! People grow taller or shorter, depending on where they stand! All this happens in Oregon, in a peculiar area called the Oregon Vortex, a circle, or rather a sphere, exactly 165 feet 4-1/2 inches in diameter up in the Gold Hill country!
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Approval Meter
BY SAMUEL KAUFMAN WITH the "approval meter," program directors will no longer have to rely on laughter, applause or boos to learn just what the audience thinks of entertainment. The method—developed by Schwerin Research Corporation—works automatically and records reaction for study later. All you do is push or pull a tiny lever at your side.
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Easter-Egg Zoo
Easter-Egg Zoo BERTHE MARCHAND used her ingenuity. Needing something original for the Easter table—something for the children to admire—she hit on the idea of making an entire zoo of animals, using colored Easter eggs and other odd bits of material easily obtained for a few cents at any stationer’s. Why don’t you do the same? […]
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Eerie Flight
Eerie Flight was “Slick” Goodlin’s description of his 19 minutes in the XS-1. He and the plane, above, were dropped from the belly of a B-29 at 27,000 feet. Once, to feel it out, he shot the XS-1 up to 550 mph. This summer he’ll try to crash the sonic barrier. He predicts 1,000 mph. […]
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Concrete Toy
Fascinating Toy with an educational value is this building set invented by Andrew Sommerfeld of Hadley, Salop, England. Using moulds which reproduce sections to scale of famous buildings, youngsters cast the parts in a special concrete strengthened by copper wire. Here they are finishing a church.
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SUPER-SPEED X-RAY
IT costs a million dollars a second to operate this X-ray machine - which is cheap. A MACHINE whose operation actually costs $1,000,000 a second may sound like a mad inventor's dream come true, yet few more practical or economical devices have ever appeared in the field of scientific research than the new 360,000-volt ultra -high-speed X-ray machine developed by Dr. Charles M. Slack and his colleagues at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation.
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No Arms
No Arms yet he enjoys the sport of bowling and even hung up a score of 96 at duckpins on his very first try in a Washington, D. C, bowling alley. The ingenious device is the invention of Harold A. Carlson, 45, who lost both arms as a youth in a railroad accident. He is […]
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Jet Engine For Your Car
THE jet engine for automobiles is no idle rumor. Here is one, pictured on these pages—and it runs. The inventor is a young engineer, Robert Kafka, of the firm of Carney Associates, New York City. Kafka has been working on his invention for ten years. His success is signalled by a report that the Army Air Forces Command at Wright Field has ordered three of the engines as soon as they can be built and delivered. The Air Forces will probably use them to start conventional turbines for airplanes, however, rather than to power automobiles.
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First Signing by television of a legally binding contract
First Signing by television of a legally binding contract was consummated above when executives of the Dumont Television Laboratories in New York and officials of the Chevrolet Motor Company, two hundred miles away in Washington, D. C, put their John Henry’s on the dotted line while watching each other in the television screen. This picture […]
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Mobile Sleeping Bag
The Gumby Mk 1. Mobile Sleeping Bag designed to permit the soldier to get into immediate action without having to fight his way out of the conventional type field unit is demonstrated at right by PFC Robert Wentermuth of Newton, N. J. The suit is not intended for wear in the daytime, only for mobility […]
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Hangover Heaven
Madness I tell you, pure madness. Hangover Heaven is the apt name of the unusual bonnet at right. Originally developed by makeup man Max Factor for the benefit of actresses who wish to refresh their faces on hot studio sets without spoiling their makeup, the facial ice pack was quickly diverted to another purpose by […]
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