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Apr, 1950
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Jul, 1950
MI Tests the 1951 Kaiser Special
"Good looks, real performance and lots of new ideas" should enable the new medium-priced Kaiser to give competitors a run for their money, says Tom McCahill. THE 1951 Supersonic six-cylinder Kaiser Special—one of three all-new lines produced this year by Kaiser-Frazer —is quite an automobile. It has good looks, real performance and a lot of brand new little ideas which should cause competitors to take inventory of their own merchandise.
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WRS VHFUHW!
Experts insist that there is no such thing as an absolutely unbreakable code. Here's how cryptanalysis, the science of breaking codes and ciphers, helped us to win two world wars. By Wilfred Weiss AN inventor interested in cryptography recently worked out a complicated device to encode and decode messages. With a million dollars worth of backing, he spent almost ten years in an effort to develop this super machine which could produce an unbreakable code. When he finally had it perfected he brought it to Washington, D. C. to be examined by the experts.
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What Happened to the Citizens Radio Band?
Simple licensing procedure has been set up, but equipment meeting government standards is not available at present time. Here's authentic data for radio and model enthusiasts. By Robert Hertzberg ABOUT a year ago, the Federal Communications Commission announced the opening of the "Citizens Radio Service," the big feature of which was the simplicity of the licensing procedure and the elimination of the technical examination required of operators in all other services. To get a "ticket," you had only to ask for it, and it didn't cost a cent.
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My Profits Are Mushrooming
A small corner in your basement and a bit of fungus mold are all you need to start a mushroom farm and grow yourself a big-money business. By Corwin Fred BACK in 1929 I knew nothing about running a business. I did know, however, that I wanted one of my own, and I realized it had to be some enterprise I could start without much cash—and learn as I went along. A few months later the profits had really started mushrooming from my own business—growing and selling mushrooms. As a mushroom farmer, I've been squeezed into some tight corners—but I've squeezed out again.
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BIKE for TWO
A comfortable tandem seat convenient for small "back seat drivers" can be attached to the luggage rack of your bicycle. The seat, which will be welcomed by every kid you know, is made of three layers. The first, which rests directly on the rack, is a piece of 1/4 in. felt padding.
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Television's Million-Dollar Jackpot for Inventors
Best break many unknown inventors ever had is an inspiring Minneapolis TV show where gadgets star and gadgeteers win fame—and funds for their ideas. By Alfred Eris TWO brothers, Fred and George Van Doren, labored long and ardently to build a better shoeshine machine. At last, just when it looked as if all their inventive efforts would pay off, they found themselves completely stymied. Like so many other inventors, they had run out of funds —right on the brink of success.
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Hitchhiking Houses
By Lester David IT scared hell out of a grizzled prospector who was walking his mule on the hot sands of the New Mexico desert. It gave a small colony of migrant Hopi Indians the screaming-meemies and it made a couple of cowboys take the pledge then and there. Cause of the panic was a huge, barnlike structure which was crawling along the roadless sand, apparently under its own power. And if that wasn't enough to frighten the wits out of everyone, a muffled, ghost-like voice echoed from the interior of the vast building.
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make your own BUBBLE COMPOUND
Glim was a brand of dish washing soap make your own BUBBLE COMPOUND WITH a startling new formula worked out particularly for MI readers, you can produce rainbow-colored bubbles that last longer and are more brilliant than the old-fashioned kind made with a soap base. In addition to the natural rainbow coloring, it is practical […]
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Small Fry's Play Stools
PLAY stools will keep children off drafty floors and are practical additions to any nursery. Here are two novel, colorful and sturdy units anyone can build. The main parts must first be enlarged by laying out the contours on paper which has been ruled into 1 in. squares. The drawings are then transferred to wood 3/4 in. thick and the pieces cut out with a jigsaw.
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He Makes Mink Telephones
By H. W. Kellick AL TEITELBAUM, a Hollywood furrier, was showing Dorothy Lamour some of the glamorous mink skins he was using in making up a fancy mink coat for the film star. As they chatted, Al happened to drape a few of the skins over his desk telephone. "Why," Dorothy cried, "that's simply stunning! And so different, too!" "What in the world are you talking about?" Al asked. "Can't you see? A mink-upholstered telephone! What a unique Christmas gift that would make!"
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Beds From Rubber Bubbles
EVER dreamed of sleeping on a bed of angel food cake? Well, foam-rubber mattresses are made at U. S. Rubber Company's Mishawaka, Ind. plant like your ole mammy used to bake that lightweight delicacy. Just as she whipped up the ingredients, poured the batter into the pan and placed it in the oven, so the pure milk of the rubber tree is mixed with chemicals, whipped into a fluffy foam and then poured into a two-piece mold to be vulcanized into permanent form.
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NEW IN SCIENCE
High Soarer: the Switchette in the right hand of Mrs. Dolores Mohlmann reached an altitude of 250 miles—higher than any other man-made article. It was attached to a two-stage rocket (model in left hand) and was used to discharge a smaller rocket at an altitude of 20 miles. Portion of tail section with this gadget was found at White Sands.
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World's Champion Old-Car Collector
LOTS of people like to save old stamps or I fill a corner cabinet with odd pipes, prize toothpicks or Easter-egg shells. But the biggest collector of them all and the world's heavyweight champion picker-upper is Barney J. Pollard. As a prosperous Detroit dealer in building materials, he collects mountains of cinders for roadmaking. As an ardent hobbyist, he packs shed after shed chock up to the roof with stacks of priceless old autos-including practically every one of the 2000 makes turned out in this country since the first horseless buggies 50 years ago.
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NEW for the HOME
Swinging Shelf meets you more than half way. Mount it atop your present shelf, pull the handle and it swings down and out to you on its special hinges. Space Saver Industries, Detroit, Mich. Flush Guide puts silencer on that annoying running toilet. It’s a device which guides the rubber-ball valve to the valve seat and can be installed in ten minutes. Made by Ardmore Products, Ardmore, Pa.
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NEW in SCIENCE
Brushoff? Never, says the Los Angeles Brush Manufacturing Corporation when it comes to ideas for new brushes. They claim no idea is too wacky to put into practice and the zany pictures on this page prove it. At upper left is a shoe brush for lazy (but neat) men.
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Smallest Public Railway
IN a quiet corner of Kent, England, there's a grade crossing where a big bump in the road could bounce an auto safely over the stack of the onrushing express. It's not that the British road is so blarsted rugged—in fact, it's smooth as Anthony Eden's smile—but that the iron horse is so jolly small. Despite its pigmy-pony size the Romney, Hythe and Dym-church Railway is a superlative line, every inch of its 14-mile run along the Channel from Hythe to Dungeness.
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Easy Money - The Hard Way
FED up with your job? There's plenty of free folding money for the guy who's willing just to sit tight a few seconds. Look at Captain Leo Simon, the man tightening the Martian earmuffs (Picture 1) to protect his job-damaged hearing. Twice a day and three times on Sundays he seats himself inside a wooden box (2) and waits a moment. For this the gaping crowds at beaches and carnivals are making him rich. . . .
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NEW in SCIENCE
Static Garter protects you from static electricity explosions in textile mills, and chemical and munition plants. The device consists of a garter connected by chain to a contact pin clipped to the sole. Thus static charges are grounded to a conductive floor. Walter G. Legge, N. Y. Window Salesman makes customers out of window shoppers. It's a tape recording device which takes orders from outside by means of a mike inserted in the window. Practical jokers will find it expensive because it will cost them a quarter a shot. Gimbels, Philadelphia.
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