Previous Issue:

Jan, 1954
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Aug, 1954
MlDEAS Come True
Well this one certainly did come true. MlDEAS Come True When these ideas were only on the drawing board. Ml predicted great futures for them. We were right. BATTLEVISION BACK in January 1952 Mechanix Illustrated ran a story called Why Don’t We Have Battlevision? In it we suggested that the generals of the future might […]
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SAFE-T-BELT
SAFE-T-BELT holds driver and passenger firmly in seal, prevents injury in minor accidents. Bolted to car’s floor, it is easily installed. The Rapid Tool & Mfg. Co.. Grand Rapids, Mich.
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make a "SHADDAP"
By Robert Hertzberg ARE some of those long-winded commercials spoiling your TV pleasure? You can cut them off temporarily, without getting up from your chair, by means of a simple gadget you can assemble and install in twenty minutes.
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HERVEY THATCHER'S MILK BOTTLE
By Alfred Lief HERVEY D. Thatcher, a physician in Potsdam, N. Y. in the 1880's, ran his own drugstore and milked his own cow. He was concerned with sanitary milking and patented a Milk Protector with rubber tubes to discharge the milk into a covered pail and thus keep out the dirt. But it failed to interest his fellow farmers. Then he carried his ideas of hygiene a step further—to the doorstep of the consumer. Milk delivery in bottles was unknown. A farmer went on his milk route with a can and dipper and the first customer got the cream but each time the can was opened, dirt from the street and hair from the horses fell in. The last customer got dirty skim milk.
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Danger! Daredevils At Work
There's a vast difference between these steel-nerved specialists and the ordinary thrill seeker. Stunting for pay is an exact science. By John N. Makris DAREDEVIL deviltry may not be the easiest or safest way to make one's living, but certainly it is the most exciting when you consider that a thrill-seeking American public shells out millions of dollars annually to watch death-defying acts, while all the time the uninvited Grim Reaper is patiently waiting to steal the show. Such successful stunts as plane crashes, speeding cars plowing through brick walls, head-on collisions, human rockets shot from cannons, backward somersaults from a 120-ft. ladder into a shallow tank surrounded with leaping flames and motorcycles tearing through heavy plate glass —all can backfire because of a tiny uncal-culated slip. Or the two dreaded enemies of the daredevil—the element of fear and a feeling of over-confidence—can often mean another tombstone in a cemetery.
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Baskets Rolled Him To Riches
Grocer S. N. Goldman looked at a folding chair and came up with a $1,000,000 idea-collapsible wire pushcarts. By Gilbert Hill MOST folks look too far away for that "big chance." It's usually right in front of you, just daring you to do something about it. S. N. Goldman, of Oklahoma City, believes this. He can prove it, too, because he's built a multi-million-dollar business —on the side, away from his regular business—with a product known around the world, just by "looking close." Goldman is a groceryman. He operates 30 huge super-markets in Oklahoma in his Standard & Humpty Dumpty chain. But he's just a little guy in the grocery business compared with some firms and yet many of his competitors couldn't get along without him.
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ROBOT ORCHESTRA
ROBOT ORCHESTRA ONE of the world’s most unique orchestras—made up entirely of robots—plays nightly at the Robot Club in Antwerp, Belgium. Designed and constructed by the club owner, Zenon Specht, the electrically-controlled musicians can play anything from tangoes to bop, changing their expressions to suit the mood. The customer is provided with three songs for […]
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Seven Year Old has Pimpin' Trailer
TRAILERETTE built by Charles Rucker of Flint Mich., for his seven year-old son, Billy, is 32 inches wide and 40 inches high. Billy hauls it around with his battery-powered “hot rod.”
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Electronic-Music Maestro
YOU'RE a radio repair man, why don't you build me an electric organ?" If Burton Minshall heard that suggestion once, he must have heard it a thousand times from his wife, Madalene. As a matter of fact, Madalene nagged her husband so often about an electric organ that Burton decided to do something about it and end her nagging. He began by saving odd parts like vacuum tubes, sockets, chokes and assorted pieces of wire and cable. He found an old reed organ in a junk shop which he bought for a song. Then he chopped it up and salvaged its physical movement. When he found another old, worn-out reed organ, he saved the five octave keyboard.
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BARBERING, BANK ROBBING AND BARTENDING
If your thirst for knowledge is not quenched by ordinary colleges or schools, there are other halls of education open to you. A suite of offices located somewhere high in the cement jungle of New York City houses one of the most amazing—and most hush-hush—institutions of learning in America. None of the building's other tenants have the faintest suspicion that it's a school. The elevator jockeys don't know and neither do the cleaning women or even the owners. In fact, only a handful of persons is aware of its very existence.
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STENO for the BLIND
STENO for the BLIND The Stenomask, a silent microphone that can be attached to most office dictating machines, enables the blind to take dictation faster than the average person using shorthand. With it, the stenographer merely repeats the words of the speaker into the mouthpiece, which completely silences her own voice. The dictating machine in […]
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Moon Farms to Banish Starvation
FIFTY years from now much of the world's food may be grown high in the sky! Tomorrow's farmers may raise their crops on artificial "moons" that have been launched into space and move in orbits around the earth. And the successful agriculturalist will probably be a combination chemist, biologist and engineer. Fantastic as it may sound, this revolutionary type of farming is more than possible. Five years of intensive research in this country and 60 years of study by five other nations have explored its potentialities. This news comes from the very conservative Carnegie Institution of Washington which has released a 357 page report on the almost unbelievable new science of "algal culture."
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FORD ATMOS
Meet the FORD ATMOS ONE of the wildest “dream” cars ever to roll out of a Michigan experimental laboratory is the creature shown above, the FX-Atmos—built by Ford and backed up by the determination that “it shall never be built for sale.” This, say the engineers, is purely a “car of the future,” however it […]
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Science Creates a Monster
Hollywood has produced some weird costumes but this $18,000 horror-suit tops them all. By Harvey B. Janes AN ominous order rang through the studios of Universal-International pictures recently: "Gill-Man—report to the underwater tank to test your three heads!" Accordingly a horrible monster, half man and half fish, lumbered menacingly across the lot, stopped at the huge water tank, poised for an instant and then plunged into the murky depths. To the casual observer it might have seemed as though the studio was being attacked by a frightful sub-human creature from out of the past but the camera and set crews, producer, directors, actors and script girls all held their ground bravely. Were they too frightened to move? Or did they all know it was a trained monster?
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